Count Me Among Them

Discussion in 'Politics' started by beretta304, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. beretta304
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    beretta304 BANNED

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    Poll: 46 percent of Americans want a third party
    Political observers have long debated: Should American politics have a third major political party? A recent Gallup poll shows that 46 percent of Americans today believe the answer is yes.

    However, this is down from the percentage of people who believed we needed a third party candidate in September 2011, a solid 55 percent.

    The number of people who believe that the two existing major parties — the Republicans and Democrats — are doing an adequate job of representing the American people was at 45 percent this month, rising from 38 percent during the same time last year.

    “Americans generally tend to support the idea that a third major party is needed on the American political scene, although such support today, at 46%, is lower than it has been over the past two years, perhaps because the poll was conducted in a presidential election year, shortly after the Republican and Democratic conventions,” Gallup notes.

    Independents are the most likely to support a major third party, with 58 percent this month saying America needed one, the second lowest proportion recorded since 2003.

    “As would be expected, Americans who have the weakest ties to either of the two major parties — independents — are consistently more likely to favor having a third party,” according to Gallup.

    Among Democrats and Republicans support for a third party is lower, at 40 percent and 36 percent respectively.

    However, no third party candidate received a significant amount of support in the poll. Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson, Green Party candidate Jill Stein and the Constitution Party’s Virgil Goode each got only one percent support. President Barack Obama took 50 percent to Republican challenger Mitt Romney’s 43 percent.

    “Despite Americans’ attitudes, no third-party candidate who garners a significant level of support has emerged,” notes Gallup. “The vast majority of votes in this year’s Nov. 6 presidential election, it follows, are likely to be cast for either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney.”



    Read more: Poll: 46 percent of Americans want a third party | The Daily Caller
     
  2. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    I on the other hand think that ALL political partys should be banned.
     
  3. JoeB131
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    JoeB131 Diamond Member

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    NOt going to happen as long as we have the mechanism of the 12th Amendment throwing any split decision into the House for resolution.

    Let's say we had a moderate between Romney and Obama, and let's say he won about a third of the electoral college and the popular vote. No one gets 270.

    The election would then be throw into the House of Representatives where each state delegation gets one vote, depending if they are dominated by GOP or Dems.

    That's why third parties pop up, stay for one or two election cycles, and vanish.
     
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  4. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    The problem is that there is no clear 3rd party that can garner enough support to challenge one of the existing parties. Whenever a 3rd party manages to get enough support, it only usually results in one of the parties being split, and a person winning the presidency with a plurarity, and not a majority.

    Look at what happned in the past. The 1860 election actually had 4 parties running, republican, Southern Democrat, Northern Democrat and Consitutional Union. The 3 parties supporting the status quo had a sizable population majority, but because of the fracturing Lincoln won the electoral college.

    In the 1912 election, the Bull Moose Party of Roosevelt actually managed to beat out the republican party (Taft) in the election, but again The split led to Wilson winning with 41% of the vote, but an overwhelming electoral majority.

    Finally you have the 1992 election, where Ross Perot greatly aided Clinton's sucessful attempt at unseating Bush I.

    For a 3rd party to have true sucesss, It would have to "eat" one of the other parties, thus going back to a 2 party system.
     
  5. ba1614
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    ba1614 Silver Member

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    As long as they are more Conservative than what passes for a Conservative today.
     
  6. Wry Catcher
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    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

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    If Romney loses as badly as did Goldwater in 1964 I would expect the Republican Party to fracture into several smaller parties. Thinking in terms of personalities the Ron Paul Libertarian Party, the Michael Bloomberg Business Party, the Jim DeMint Christian-Republican Party and the Dick Cheney Neoconservative party.
     
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  7. Seawytch
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    Seawytch Information isnt Advocacy

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    Citizens United made a 3rd party all but impossible.
     
  8. JoeB131
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    JoeB131 Diamond Member

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    I disagree.

    I still think this is going to relatively close as an election, but let's say Romney completely collapses, he'll still take most of the states that McCain did. Maybe he'll lose Arizona and Missouri, but not much beyond that.

    I suspect there will be recriminations in teh GOP as to why he lost, the TEA Party will blame the Establishmetn and the Establishment will blame the Christian Right. But at the end of the day, most of the blame will go onto Romney for being a bad candidate.
     
  9. Wry Catcher
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    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

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    [I don't see Romney winning the popular vote even if he were to win the general election]

    In 1964 Johnson won 61% of the vote, Goldwater 38.5%; Romney might take all the states as did McCain but the popular vote will be telling. Telling in the respect of how fractured the GOP has become.

    In terms of the GOP remaining as one party, I believe that depends on who takes the tourch. A charasmatic leader might be able to bring the factions together but how could such a figure govern?
     
  10. Liberal
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    Liberal Libruhl! Libruhl!

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    Man, it would be interesting to see additional "relevant" parties come into being.

    With so many years of the same 2 parties being deeply rooted in politics it seems like it really would take a long time for a third (or any other) to really take a good footing.

    Additional relevant and viable parties would make elections so much more interesting, IMHO.
     

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