Compote

Discussion in 'Gardening and Landscaping' started by OsteInmar, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    My great grandfather and grandfather annually planted three gardens. Two were potato, and the other was mixed vegetables: corn, onions, carrots, string beans, radishes, turnips, squash, tomatoes, cantaloupe, broccoli and watermelon. They also had a grapevine and peach and apple pear trees growing up on the hill and mulberry trees down below. Every year my great grandmother, along with the other women in the family, would can fruits and vegetables in jars, make jelly and apple butter; and the men would make grape, mulberry and dandelion wine and brandy. Since the deaths of my great and grand parents, no one has picked up the torch of planting and canning, and the family property--several hundred acres--was sold off in 2015.

    Nowadays, we grow small vegetable and herb gardens, cure and smoke meat, etc. but it's nothing like those old days.
     
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  2. OsteInmar
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    OsteInmar BANNED

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    Thank you.
    This is very sad. Everything was similar. My ancestors moved from the Urals (a cold place in the USSR) to Moldova, where it is warm. They had grapes, cherries, strawberries. Plants such as apricots, zherdeli, mulberry there grew on the streets, like weeds ... We made compotes and jams. Grandfather prepared wine from grapes. We had a huge cellar 5 meters underground.
    In Moldova, pears, apples were so cheap that people simply fed them pigs, and in Moscow they were a deficit
    But we did not sell it. It's just that in the early 80's they returned to the Urals, and then the USSR collapsed and Moldova became a different country.
    Now we have a small plot of land near Moscow. The climate is cold, so there is not much fruit. We try to do something ..
     
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  3. night_son
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    night_son Gold Member

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    Fascinating to learn about other cultures. Thanks.

    My grandparents had a "root cellar" under their house where they kept potatoes. It was accessed by a small wooden door off the basement they kept locked with a "hook and eye". They also had two barrels buried up to the openings in the ground in which they also kept potatoes. One summer they sent me up on the hill to get potatoes out of a barrel, and it was squirming inside with balls of garter snakes all wrapped around each other.

    In the winter, after the edges of the creeks had frozen, my grandfather and I would walk along them breaking off chunks of ice, which we'd use to make homemade ice cream. They also had a couple of horizontal freezers to store extra food. And we'd also walk the railroad tracks picking up buckets full of walnuts.
     
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  4. OsteInmar
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    OsteInmar BANNED

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    Oh yeah..
    Now, the cellar is my dream.
    We live in a very humid area, where you can not dig a cellar. I saw that they were selling cellars made of plastic, but for now I doubt it.
    My late Aunt had a cellar under the shed. He had a house in which it was always hot, so he slept in this barn above the cellar. It's cool there.
    My great-grandmother had a glacier cellar. The ice there was stored all summer and frozen meat. It was in the early 20th century.
     
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