Can U.S. Stop Using Oil by 2050?

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Adam's Apple, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Can the U.S. Stop Using Oil by 2050?
    By Scott Burns for Money Central
    April 8, 2005

    Yes, says visionary Amory Lovins. So long as we get serious about improving energy efficiency. The cost? $180 billion over 10 years.

    Nearly 30 years ago Amory Lovins took on the utility industry. The industry was predicting a high-energy future filled with nuclear power plants. Lovins called the utility forecasts "the hard path" because they committed us to producing ever more energy. Writing in Foreign Affairs, Lovins suggested an alternative, "Soft Energy Paths."

    Lovins pointed out that the least expensive, safest and most secure energy we could acquire wouldn't come from more drilling and more nuclear power plants. It would come from using energy more efficiently. Rather than the hard work of raising the bridge, he suggested the easier work of lowering the water. All we had to do was to make cars, trucks, houses and buildings more energy efficient. That, he wrote, would eliminate the need to build more nuclear power plants and to search the planet for new sources of hydrocarbons.

    Lovins -- ridiculed as a dreamer at the time -- was right. The conventional wisdom was wrong. Energy efficiency in the next decade reduced our oil consumption so fast, it broke the pricing power of OPEC and crushed oil prices.

    Now, working with a team from his Rocky Mountain Institute and with the support of the Department of Defense, Lovins has a bolder idea: Apply energy efficiency to end our dependence on oil. Not just foreign oil, mind you, all oil. In the process, we can revolutionize (and save) our automobile industry, create a million jobs, strengthen our economy, end the flow of oil money that funds terrorism and win enduring national security.

    In "Winning the Oil Endgame," Lovins shows us the path to reduce our oil consumption. How much? How fast? Think about these figures:
    We could reduce the amount we import from the Persian Gulf by 2015.

    We could use less oil by 2025 than we used in 1970.

    We could import no oil at all by 2040.

    We could use no oil at all by 2050. More impressive, much of this can be done simply by getting back on the efficiency-improvement path we were on when we responded to the first and second OPEC oil price shocks in 1973 and 1979.

    for full article
    http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/invest/extra/P113797.asp?GT1-6359
     
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  2. Yurt
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    Yurt Gold Member

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    This would be great!
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I'm assuming what is meant here is using no oil for energy ?
     
  4. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Since the thrust of his article was about transportation, I think that's what was meant. By learning to use the energy available to us more efficiently, we would need no oil by 2050.
     
  5. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    I saw a story on a local man that runs his truck on re-cycled vegetable oil.
    He says he can convert any diesel to run on it.
    I don't know about mileage, but it's a renewable resource.
     
  6. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Would it cut into our food supply ?
     
  7. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    I have no idea how veg oil is processed...So I don't know..but my guess would be, if we used it for fuel, there would be growers dedicated to just that..not a primary food source.
    Although the by-product could still be used somehow i would think.
     
  8. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Just curious--since we have X amount of arable land I would hate to endanger our food supply and our ability to feed starving people .
     
  9. 007
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    007 Charter Member Supporting Member

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    I'm all for alternative energy, and the development of energy efficient utilities, housing and transportation. I think anyone impeading that effort at this point should be tried for High Treason. I just gased up my truck, and it cost me $50 freakin' dollars. "Regular" gas here in Reno is $2.59.9 a gallon. I'd love to be able to tell the sons a bitchin rag heads to DRINK their fucking oil.

    In the same breath though, I'd sure miss driving my internal combustion engine vehicle. I'd hope that there'd be enough gas left around to drive my hotrod on the weekend or something.
     
  10. Wolfe
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    more solar power usage needs to be encouraged. If the US decided to make it an goal each year to develop and use sloar energy then reliance on oil could be slowly be reduced. I think that a need for oil will always exist. Just think...in Northern Alberta there is more oil there that all the rest of the proven reserves....its just difficult to extract.
     

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