Boredom and C's

Discussion in 'Education' started by Annie, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Interesting study here:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070228...c&printer=1;_ylt=AmO2CNdZnywFjJbLFdLk4aAXIr0F

    The reason I say interesting is the last of the 3 highlighted 'suggestions' has been being pushed by education departments for the past 15-20 years, yet over and over again, it has not proved an effective learning tool. Projects are those wonderful 'assessments' such as building a pyramid, making some sort of diorama, making and wearing costumes-while pretending to be a news host or guest. While there has been some positive learning results up to grade 4, the gains must be weighed against the reported negatives of usually being part of 'cooperative grouping': fighting with peers; being dominated by one or two members; being stuck with more than a fair share of work; being the 'smart one' in a group; being the 'low one' in a group; etc.

    By the very nature of projects, the learning results from them tends to be on the lower end of cognitive development. They are literal interpretations of facts gathered.

    In fact, the most effective method of dispensing information and for the learner to be able to interpret, synthesize, and generalize from is 'direct instruction', i.e., lecture. When combined with extension readings and assignments that require the learner to extrapolate and expand from the infomation given the results of testing demonstrate the integration of the information into the learner's base of knowledge.

    While education departments in universities around the country keep pushing for 'cooperative learning', project based assessments, etc., the math, science, and even social sciences departments are racking up the proof of the less effective methodologies.

    I would hypothesize that the results from the 'study' may be skewed by the researchers or possibly the students are a result of having had 'group fun' in lower grades, have not adjusted to the more rigorous and effective teaching in secondary schools.
     
  2. gabosaurus
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    gabosaurus Member

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    This is because, in many states, teachers are under immense pressure to have their students pass standardized tests. The teachers end up spending more time going over the limited spectrum of the tests and much less teaching students what they need to know.
     
  3. Kagom
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    Kagom Senior Member

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    I have to say I was bored with a lot of classes. Only a handful I actually knew more than the teacher.

    I say high school doesn't offer enough academic level (my school had general level, academic level, and honors level for classes) classes that are challenging or interesting.
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    But nowhere was that the results the researcher was responding to. In actuality, I don't think you find that much teaching to tests, unless the teacher is a poor teacher. Of course, these would be among the bright lights that get caught changing student answers and such.
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    You mean less than a full complement of college prep?
     
  6. gabosaurus
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    gabosaurus Member

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    I have read that, in Texas and a couple of other states, teachers can be fired if enough of their students do not pass the state mandated standarized tests. Meaning you can be a great teacher, but if your students blow off the tests, you can lose your job.
    I had some great teachers in high school. Then again, I was a good student. Others were not as interested.
     
  7. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Most students would not purposely fail standardized test to 'get' a good teacher.
     
  8. Kagom
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    Kagom Senior Member

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    I believe so. The academic classes weren't that challenging, nothing like a college level course would be. English was a joke. In my religion classes I knew more and even had to help the teacher often to make sure she was correct. Math (aside from Geometry) was easy. Science, I will say, was difficult, but that is only due to the fact that my skills in science is below average. Languages I won't really comemnt on. That's something that just seems to come to me. My other electives were interesting, though, but the only real problem was the limited amount you could have.
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    What sort of area were you living in? City, suburb, rural? I think it's a crime that so many non-magnet Chicago schools do not have a full AP menu, when so many of the parents would need to struggle financially to enroll their children for the classes in college.

    In most of the suburban schools around here, all or nearly all of the possible AP classes are available. It's not difficult for a bright, motivated kid to test out of a year or more of gen ed college courses, either graduating early or leaving time within 4 years to more deeply study their areas of concentration.

    I know that rural areas struggle both to find teachers and enough students to field the classes.
     
  10. Kagom
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    Kagom Senior Member

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    Town/suburb.
     

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