American Youths

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by JROTCcadet, May 24, 2004.

  1. JROTCcadet
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    JROTCcadet Guest

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    As a student, I have to say I'm a little concerned both with how young adults are percieved in America, and with how they earn that reputation. It seems as though (as often happens with war or international conflict) students are beginning to rise from their political slumber that's been occuring since the 'hippie' generation grew up. More and more often I see student demonstrations and protests: which is great on one level. On the one hand, it shows a decline in young political apathy, this is a very good thing. On the other, I'm afraid that my generation may make the same mistake as our parents (not all of them, some were decent protestors :) ). In short, we risk becoming too arrogant. While wisdom is not assured with age, one does have to experience some degree of this world before they can truly have an impact in it. However, my generation (and know The Who starts playing in my head) seems to quick to jump on the activist bandwagon. What's worse, I don't even feel that we're as justified as the previous generation. I'd just like American youths start voting and writing their senators before they hold a sign and come up with witty chants. It's easy to point fingers guys, I know, but it's better to offer solutions
     
  2. nycflasher
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    nycflasher Active Member

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    I couldn't agree more. I'm 28, and more educated than I was say 8 years ago when politics held less of my interest to begin with.

    But I meet younger kids all the time who are amped up about having an opportunity to vent, speak-out, rebel... but aren't exactly sure what they're rebelling against.

    It's easy to feed off of the energy of a movement, the next step is educating yourself about the movement and its opposition so you can cogently be an active part of it.
     
  3. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I know exactly what im rebelling agianst. liberalism.
     
  4. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    link doesn't work, I don't know why, too long I guess


    Out of Berkeley no less.
     
  5. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    link didnt work bro.
     
  6. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    Well then here's the whole thing. Second link on a "youth conservative majority" www.google.com search.


    <center>Youths more conservative than their elders</center>



    Berkeley, CA -- September 24, 2002 -- The generation gap between youths and older adults might not be what you’d expect, and on some political issues involving religion and abortion, young people may be the most conservative of all, according to a new survey by University of California, Berkeley, political scientists.

    The report, released today (Tuesday, Sept. 24) by the campus’s Survey Research Center as part of the center’s Public Agendas and Citizen Engagement Survey (PACES), is based on interviews nationwide with Americans ages 15 to 92. It provides a comprehensive assessment of the generation gap in American political opinions.

    UC Berkeley political science professors Merrill Shanks and Henry Brady were the lead researchers, along with Indiana University professor Edward Carmines. Douglas Strand of the Survey Research Center was the study’s project director. Topics and results include:

    School prayer. Fifty-nine percent of adults ages 27 to 59 want public schools to allow prayer at official school activities, such as commencements. Among teenagers, 69 percent support school prayer.

    Federal aid to faith-based charities. Forty percent of adults ages 27 to 59 support such funding. But support reaches 59 percent among the college-aged and 67 percent among younger teens.

    Religious conservatives. Young Americans show somewhat more warmth towards religious conservatives than older adults. Individuals ranked their feelings for these groups on a scale from zero for “cold” to 50-100 for varying degrees of “warmth.” Although no age group showed much warmth to Christian fundamentalists, 33 percent of youths ages 15 to 26 gave them a rating over 50; 26 percent of Americans over age 26 gave a similar score.

    Abortion. Government restrictions on abortion are supported by 34 percent of adults over 26, while about 44 percent of youths ages 15 to 22 support such restrictions.

    “We were surprised by the greater support among young Americans for some aspects of the conservative cultural agenda,” said Shanks. “Young Americans show more conservatism on religious politics and abortion even though youths, as a group, appear to be less likely than their elders to attend religious services regularly or consider religion a guide in their daily life.

    “If the youth of today maintain these positions on religious politics and abortion as the years go by, then the American public as a whole could become more conservative on these issues.”

    In the case of social security and education, if there is a generation gap in opinions, it is the elderly who stand out, not the youth. Youth are just as supportive as their parents and grandparents when it comes to government spending on health care for seniors. However, older Americans don’t show a corresponding supportiveness for the education programs that benefit youth. While 70 percent of young and middle-aged Americans support more spending on elementary and secondary education, only 52 percent of those over 60 favor increased school funding.

    Some traditional political differences between young and older Americans continue to prevail. Youths are more inclined to want the federal government to do more to protect women and racial minorities from job discrimination. They also are more likely to consider job discrimination against gays and lesbians to be a serious problem. And they want more federal programs to assist the poor and protect the environment.

    Differences between the young and old are most dramatic when it comes to sex and violence on television. Among Americans ages 27-59, 67 percent think “the amount of sexual content on television” is a serious problem, while just 47 percent of teens and the college-aged feel that way.

    And while an overwhelming majority of the adults ages 27 to 59--74 percent--thinks TV violence is a serious problem, the majority of teens and young adults--55 percent--disagree.

    On many other issues, however, there was no generation gap. The study found no dramatic differences between younger and older Americans on such issues as military defense, gun control, tax policy, criminal punishment, and government support for health care in general.

    “The next step for us and other scholars is to solve the puzzles in our overall picture of the generation gaps in political opinions,” said Strand. “We need to explore why youths seem to be more conservative than their elders when it comes to religious politics and abortion politics, but not other issues.”

    Strand speculated that messages criticizing abortion and supporting school prayer and government aid to religious charities may have been more prominent in the media while the youngest generation was developing political views. He noted that older generations developed their basic positions on these issues before religious conservatives began mobilizing politically in the late 1970s.

    The study is based on telephone interviews completed during the latter half of 2001, and most occurred between late April and September 10. About 1,250 people were interviewed, a standard sample for academic survey research.

    The executive summary of the report, containing additional details about it, is available on the Web at www.pewtrusts.com/pdf/pp_paces.pdf.

    The project was funded by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts, which support nonprofit activities in the areas of culture, education, the environment, health and human services, public policy and religion.© 2002
     
  7. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Beautiful, but what do you expect. We are the Reagan Generation. We have seen Reagans defeat of the Soviets, the triumph of America. We have been tutored by Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Glenn Beck. We have see evil in the world on 911. We have realized our liberties can be taken easily and must be defended.

    Most important we are more religious. We have a deeper faith in God that has grown strong because of the Cultural friction between the standards of God and the world. And because we have a mission to prepare for the Second Coming of the Lord, whether in our lifetimes or in the lives of our children or grandchildren the time is coming. We live in a marvelous age.

    Onto abortion specifically is it really that surprising that more young people are conservative on this issue? its the conservatives not having the abortions and hence passing their values on. As long as the pro abortionists continue to murder their offspring, the movement will die out.
     
  8. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    Natural selection at its finest. The unfit die.
     
  9. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Exactly. its a wonder they havent realized their problem yet.
     
  10. Zhukov
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    Well, they're communists. Ever heard of Lysenkoism?

    Can you blame them? Capitalism and natural selection go hand in hand.
     

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