Accident On The Flight Deck

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by NATO AIR, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. NATO AIR
    Offline

    NATO AIR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,275
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USS Abraham Lincoln
    Ratings:
    +282
    This weekend, while undergoing carrier qualifications in the Sea of Japan, we had a wire break after a Super Hornet (the Navy's best, newest jet) landed.... The aircraft went overboard, taking the two pilots with it (they were promptly rescued). The snapped wire whipped around the flight deck, hitting multiple people, including a young airman who lost a leg (at the knee) as a result. Another stricken airman lost much of his nose.

    The "vets" and "old-timers" say this happens all the time in carrier aviation, the most dangerous military evolution there is after warfighting itself. They (understandably perhaps) seemed unshaken by what happened. In fact, our leading petty officer (LPO, the leading E-6 in the workcenter) in my new workcenter saw fit to deliever a tirade about certain problems in the workcenter while all this was happening (which struck me as petty and dangerous in itself, because he was talking over the 1MC (the ship's speaker system) and those of us who serve in repair lockers (the ship's volunteer firefighters and damage control specialists) could not hear what was being announced, or whether or not we were going to "General Quarters" (a variation of Battle Stations)

    I wanted to share what happened afterwards though, because it so "touched" me.
    The flight deck is very, very dangerous. You've got 18,19 year old guys in charge of the careful and thorough examination and care of multi-million dollar aircraft by other 18-19 year olds. You can't help but admire the guts and hard work of these fellows and gals, who often work in an environment that is already difficult but made even more so by extremely hot temperatures (like in the Gulf or in the Western Pacific). I respect these folks even more than I did before, especially after witnessing what happened after the accident.
    There were these young "kids" who were in tears, others who were in shock, and a few who looked like they wanted to jump off the boat. A big, burly E-5 with bloods stains on his arms, floatcoat and face paced around, sobbing and whimpering. It was one of his airman who lost his leg on the flight deck, and another one of his airman who found that leg a few feet away.
    A good deal of chiefs (E-7 and above) were mustering in the adjacent hangar bay and afterwards, joined two of the chaplains in comforting these people. We give the chiefs onboard a lot of grief because too many of them have ceded their rightful power and influence to the officers, but this day they shined. There is this invisible "barrier" between chiefs and "blueshirts" (E-6 and below) in the Navy, often a source of friction because they sometimes oversegregate themselves from those they're responsible for. It dropped for a few minutes as these longtime veterans helped calm and steady the nerves of disturbed airmen. They didn't tell those who were crying to "buck up", they allowed them their time to get over a near-death experience (and having to watch as some of their friends were horribly injured by the snapped wire) and encouraged them to let it out so they could get over it.
    They got involved when they could have shrugged and walked away. Blood, sweat, grease and tears soiled their uniforms, as they carried a few injured airmen to the battle dressing station (a triage site) whose injuries had escaped notice. For those witnessing this as we stood in ranks in the hangar bay, it was a moment we won't soon forget.
     
  2. no1tovote4
    Offline

    no1tovote4 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,294
    Thanks Received:
    616
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +616
    :salute:

    I remember in boot camp when they showed some of the movies about the accidents that happen...
     
  3. drowe
    Offline

    drowe Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    219
    Thanks Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    79119
    Ratings:
    +35
    It is good to take notice of those things NATO; it is also important to reflect upon them too if you're ever unsure about any of your leadership's character in the future.

    Did you guys have a Safety Stand Down afterwards? I hope the LPO was at least “spoken to” about yakking over the 1MC at the time.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  4. CSM
    Offline

    CSM Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    6,907
    Thanks Received:
    708
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Northeast US
    Ratings:
    +708
    Sorry to hear of the accident. The fact that you noticed that not ALL the old chiefs are what you thought speaks well for you...and you can be sure that other junior members noticed as well.

    Sometimes what appears as callousness or apathy is an inner struggle to remain calm and determine the best course of action in a crisis.
     
  5. NATO AIR
    Offline

    NATO AIR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,275
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USS Abraham Lincoln
    Ratings:
    +282
    I can agree about that.
     
  6. NATO AIR
    Offline

    NATO AIR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,275
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USS Abraham Lincoln
    Ratings:
    +282
    The Air Dept. is having a safety standdown rather than the entire ship.

    and no, the e-6 was encouraged by our workcenter chief after his appalling misjudgement.

    oh well, tis the navy
     
  7. no1tovote4
    Offline

    no1tovote4 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,294
    Thanks Received:
    616
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +616
    Cheese and rice! Encouraged to interrupt emergency proceedings with a tirade?

    Yeah, that's the NAVY that I remember...
     
  8. NATO AIR
    Offline

    NATO AIR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,275
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USS Abraham Lincoln
    Ratings:
    +282
    :rotflmao:

    regardless of the crazy new LPO or whatever else the ship throws at me this last week in port.... I have female companionship (supposedly) this weekend and the super bowl on monday morning with all the bud ice and hennessy my young stomach and liver can hold

    but yea, that really pissed me off... when "mass casualty on the flight deck" was announced, i was praying i could hear which Battle Dressing Station was open (there are 5 all over the ship)
     
  9. no1tovote4
    Offline

    no1tovote4 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,294
    Thanks Received:
    616
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +616
    And there is little you can do except remember if you ever get there not to do the same yourself. There are many examples of such in the Armed Forces of any type.

    Now I had a Chief that would have just about killed me for not showing up timely to the first Battle Dressing Station that was announced open even though I couldn't hear the announcement. There was a couple times I was put on crappy midnight fax watches because I didn't psychically know what he wanted me to do.
     
  10. NATO AIR
    Offline

    NATO AIR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,275
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    USS Abraham Lincoln
    Ratings:
    +282
    now that's just cold... :bs1:
     

Share This Page