A Better Plan

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Richard-H, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. Richard-H
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    Richard-H Gold Member

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    Congress needs to take a close look at exactly what their responsibilities are under the Constitution before giving away $700 Billion to Bush's Wall St. Buddies.

    Congress has an obligation to safeguard the welfare of the United States, not the welfare of a few banking executives.

    Major funding of this extreme should only be taken when the general welfare is threatened and should be done in a way that only goes as far as protecting the general welfare.

    A better plan for fixing the current banking crisis, and which would get to the root of the problem, would be for Congress to start a program whereby whenever anyone defaults on a mortgage, the Federal government would pay up to 50% of their mortgage payments and require them to pay the difference. In return the government would receive up to 50% of the equity on the property in question.

    This would:

    1. Keep people in their homes, but they would still have to pay 50% or more of their mortgage bill. Their equity would be proportional to what they had paid.

    2. Make the currently insolvent mortgages solvent, so the banking 'crises' would end.

    3. Stop the flow of foreclosed properties onto the market and end the real estate slump.

    4. Eventually provide a profit for the government that they could mandate to be applied against the national debt.

    The present bailout proposal does not get to the heart of the problem, does not slow down the rate of foreclosures, does not fix the real estate slump, continues to let the people who took out the mortgages completely weasel out of paying them, sticks the American People with $700 billion in bad debt. and only benefits a tiny number of Wall St. execs who screwed up royally and don't deserve it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2008

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