Pests from mexico enter the usa.

LilOlLady

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PESTS FROM MEXICO ENTER THE USA.

Mexican Border:
U.S. Agricultural Quarantine Information Notice to Arriving Travelers
Plant Protection & Quarantine

February 2003
American agriculture is threatened by microscopic plant and animal pests and diseases. Travelers entering the United States may unknowingly carry these hitchhikers that could seriously damage American agriculture.

Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Permitted into the United States (after passing inspection)

Acorns
Avocados, without seed (not admitted into California, Florida, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, or Guam)
Bananas
Blackberries (fruit)
Blueberries(fruit)
Cacao bean pod
Chestnuts
Dates
Eggs, boiled or cooked
Lemons
Lettuce
Limes, sour
Mint
Pineapple (prohibited into Hawaii)
Prickly pear fruit (tuna)
Prickly pear pad (nopales)
Radish
Rampion
Raspberries (fruit)
Rhubarb
Rosemary (above–ground parts)
Sage
Spinach
Strawberries
Vegetables—Most vegetables are permitted after inspection. For a detailed status of certain
vegetables, consult with your local APHIS/Plant Protection and Quaranine office or check
USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.
Watercress
Note that these are general lists. For complete details, go to USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.


Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Not Permitted into the United States
Animal feed
Meats (including meat, pork, and raw poultry)
Plants—Some plants may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Seeds—Some seeds may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Soil
Straw
Sugarcane
Sweet potatoes
Wheat straw


APHIS | News

Pests from Mexcio do fall under illegal alien catagory, don't they?:eusa_whistle:
 
Last edited:

lehr

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PESTS FROM MEXICO ENTER THE USA.

Mexican Border:
U.S. Agricultural Quarantine Information Notice to Arriving Travelers
Plant Protection & Quarantine

February 2003
American agriculture is threatened by microscopic plant and animal pests and diseases. Travelers entering the United States may unknowingly carry these hitchhikers that could seriously damage American agriculture.

Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Permitted into the United States (after passing inspection)

Acorns
Avocados, without seed (not admitted into California, Florida, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, or Guam)
Bananas
Blackberries (fruit)
Blueberries(fruit)
Cacao bean pod
Chestnuts
Dates
Eggs, boiled or cooked
Lemons
Lettuce
Limes, sour
Mint
Pineapple (prohibited into Hawaii)
Prickly pear fruit (tuna)
Prickly pear pad (nopales)
Radish
Rampion
Raspberries (fruit)
Rhubarb
Rosemary (above–ground parts)
Sage
Spinach
Strawberries
Vegetables—Most vegetables are permitted after inspection. For a detailed status of certain
vegetables, consult with your local APHIS/Plant Protection and Quaranine office or check
USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.
Watercress
Note that these are general lists. For complete details, go to USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.


Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Not Permitted into the United States
Animal feed
Meats (including meat, pork, and raw poultry)
Plants—Some plants may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Seeds—Some seeds may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Soil
Straw
Sugarcane
Sweet potatoes
Wheat straw


APHIS | News

Pests from Mexcio do fall under illegal alien catagory, don't they?:eusa_whistle:
where do u think bed bugs come from ???
 

Againsheila

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PESTS FROM MEXICO ENTER THE USA.

Mexican Border:
U.S. Agricultural Quarantine Information Notice to Arriving Travelers
Plant Protection & Quarantine

February 2003
American agriculture is threatened by microscopic plant and animal pests and diseases. Travelers entering the United States may unknowingly carry these hitchhikers that could seriously damage American agriculture.

Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Permitted into the United States (after passing inspection)

Acorns
Avocados, without seed (not admitted into California, Florida, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, or Guam)
Bananas
Blackberries (fruit)
Blueberries(fruit)
Cacao bean pod
Chestnuts
Dates
Eggs, boiled or cooked
Lemons
Lettuce
Limes, sour
Mint
Pineapple (prohibited into Hawaii)
Prickly pear fruit (tuna)
Prickly pear pad (nopales)
Radish
Rampion
Raspberries (fruit)
Rhubarb
Rosemary (above–ground parts)
Sage
Spinach
Strawberries
Vegetables—Most vegetables are permitted after inspection. For a detailed status of certain
vegetables, consult with your local APHIS/Plant Protection and Quaranine office or check
USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.
Watercress
Note that these are general lists. For complete details, go to USDA - APHIS - Missing Page - Error 404.


Agricultural Items Originating in Mexico Not Permitted into the United States
Animal feed
Meats (including meat, pork, and raw poultry)
Plants—Some plants may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Seeds—Some seeds may enter with permit; consult with USDA/APHIS.
Soil
Straw
Sugarcane
Sweet potatoes
Wheat straw


APHIS | News

Pests from Mexcio do fall under illegal alien catagory, don't they?:eusa_whistle:
Sugarcane is not allowed? Why? The best sugar comes from sugarcane.
 

waltky

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Another by-product of free trade agreements...
:eek:
Global Trade Carries Risk of Pests
April 12, 2013 - More than one trillion dollars’ worth of agricultural products is traded every year. But as countries buy and sell fruits, vegetables, timber and other products, they also may be putting domestic plants at risk. That’s why new standards have been issued under the International Plant Protection Treaty.
The global trade in agriculture means the food someone eats may have come from a country thousands of miles away. But as food is unloaded from ships and planes, some unwelcome visitors may find a new home. Many already have. Take the stink bug, for example, in the United States. It’s believed to have arrived from China and finds American fruit crops delicious. Pests can also include fruit fly eggs or fungal spores. Some of the well known threats include wheat rust, African army worms, Cassava Bacterial Blight and the European Grapevine Moth. The list goes on.

That’s where the International Plant Protection Convention comes in. “The convention originated back in 1952. It’s been revised a couple of times – 1979 and 1997. The purpose of the convention is to develop standards for trade and plants and plant products. And it’s recognized as one of the three standard setting bodies under the World Trade Organization,” said Craig Fedchock, who’s the convention coordinator.

At the convention’s annual meeting in Rome, upgraded standards were issued for pest risk analysis. It gives greater guidance for determining whether an imported plant might be a threat to cultivated or wild plants. Fedchock said that another standard was revised regarding wood packaging material. “Everybody in the world has probably seen a wood pallet at some time or other. Well, that pallet is made generally from wood that’s not the best quality wood. Maybe the trees are dead when being made into pallets and beetles will bore into that wood and then they’ll emerge. And they can be a devastating forest pest. And we have evidence again, being from the U.S., of something like the Asian Longhorn Beetle, which has quite a voracious appetite for certain trees. But this isn’t limited to the United States. There’s Pinewood Nematode in China. It’s around the world,” he said.

The risk of pests is growing due to the sheer amount of global trade. “More and more things are being traded. More and more people are traveling. The risks associated with people bringing a piece of fruit or some fruit from a backyard tree to a relative in another country – that’s happening more frequently. Or new and exotic fruits and vegetables are coming from one country to another or another hemisphere to another hemisphere -- the risks increase incrementally just by the volume of trade<” he said. He said that serious harm can be done to a country if a risk assessment is not done. “A pest risk assessment is a valuable part of the entire process of trade to make sure that a country can protect itself, but yet ensure that anything that does get imported is safe.”

More Global Trade Carries Risk of Pests
 

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