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Lapalma erupts........YIKES

Old Rocks

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Considering 80% of the population lives within 15 miles of the coast I would say your cavalier attitude is a bit misplaced.
Considering that statement is laughably inaccurate, I would have to say that your reputation for lying remains intact.

"What percentage of Americans live within 100 miles of the coast?

As of 2014, nearly 40% of the population lived in counties on the coast. Though home to almost 40% of the U.S. population, coastal areas account for less than 10% of the total land in the contiguous United States. In the U.S., 127 million people live in coastal counties.Feb 26, 2021"

 

westwall

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Considering that statement is laughably inaccurate, I would have to say that your reputation for lying remains intact.

"What percentage of Americans live within 100 miles of the coast?

As of 2014, nearly 40% of the population lived in counties on the coast. Though home to almost 40% of the U.S. population, coastal areas account for less than 10% of the total land in the contiguous United States. In the U.S., 127 million people live in coastal counties.Feb 26, 2021"





40% of the AMERICAN population. And of that population 85% is within 15 miles of the coast

You ain't too bright are you. You certainly can't read for comprehension
 

Old Rocks

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40% of the AMERICAN population. And of that population 85% is within 15 miles of the coast

You ain't too bright are you. You certainly can't read for comprehension

In Post #19, you wrote "Considering 80% of the population lives within 15 miles of the coast I would say your cavalier attitude is a but misplaced."

So now you say you said 40% of the AMERICAN population. And of that 85% is within 15 miles of the coast. LOL

85% of 40% is not 80% of the population. LOL
 

mamooth

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Considering 80% of the population lives within 15 miles of the coast I would say your cavalier attitude is a bit misplaced.
We expect skook to fall for every bit of idiot propaganda out there, given that he's an imbecile, but we hoped for a bit better from a "geologist".


No, La Palma will not create a massive tsunami. That's hysterical yellow journalism. It's based on a 2001 paper that is universally regarded as really bad.

That paper makes the assumption that a 350 km^3 block will slide down into the ocean as one piece. Thing is, that's never happened in the past, there's no reason to think it ever would happen, and it's kind of not possible for it to happen, given that crumbly rock doesn't behave in that way. Past landslides there have occurred as a serious of small slides, which pose no threat to the east coast. They only pose a tsunami threat to the local Canary Islands.

What's more, even the worst case wave was miscalculated. If that whole thing did slide off as one block, the tsunami height at Florida would be more like 10 feet. That wave height would get smaller as you go up the coast. Destructive, sure, but it's not going to wipe out any cities.
 

iamwhatiseem

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This might not be good.......Ive heard it this think blows, the entire east coast of the United States is gone 200 miles inland. Tidal wave

La Palma Volcano Eruption: Wall Of Lava Flows Down Hillsides Of Spanish Island, Destroying Everything In Its Path (Photos)

I actually think the human racists would cheer........natural depopulation!
200 miles???
What?
FFS - is it going to be a mile high surge? Cause that is about what it would take to go 200 miles inland.
200 miles inland...
Winston-Salem NC... 970 ft above sea level... you realize how much water it would take to get there??
Farmville, VA... 630 ft above sea level
West Chester PA... 446 ft above sea level
Keene Valley, NY...1358 ft... oops ... mountains
 

iamwhatiseem

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And the eruption would never happen if it wasn't for global warming... oops... I mean climate change.









:lol:
 

bodecea

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Lessee: Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC--- I'm sorry, what was the downside of this again?
And there we have the trump cult, folks. But if we're gonna play, imagine ALL of Florida.
 

westwall

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We expect skook to fall for every bit of idiot propaganda out there, given that he's an imbecile, but we hoped for a bit better from a "geologist".


No, La Palma will not create a massive tsunami. That's hysterical yellow journalism. It's based on a 2001 paper that is universally regarded as really bad.

That paper makes the assumption that a 350 km^3 block will slide down into the ocean as one piece. Thing is, that's never happened in the past, there's no reason to think it ever would happen, and it's kind of not possible for it to happen, given that crumbly rock doesn't behave in that way. Past landslides there have occurred as a serious of small slides, which pose no threat to the east coast. They only pose a tsunami threat to the local Canary Islands.

What's more, even the worst case wave was miscalculated. If that whole thing did slide off as one block, the tsunami height at Florida would be more like 10 feet. That wave height would get smaller as you go up the coast. Destructive, sure, but it's not going to wipe out any cities.




It hasn't? You sure about that? Below is one small incident that happened just a few decades ago. In the scientific world this is called an analog for what will eventually happen with the La Palma fault block.

Lituya Bay’s Apocalyptic Wave​


Eyewitness reports describe a chaotic and surreal scene: Intense shaking for several minutes, an explosive boom, and a shattered glacier soaring hundreds of feet into the air. Then a series of giant waves dotted with hunks of ice raced through the bay. One fisherman described his boat being lofted over a forested spit on the crest of one wave and looking down at trees below. The wave obliterated a cabin on Cenotaph island and swept away a lighthouse near the mouth of the bay. One couple that had been fishing when the wave hit were never heard from again.

The damage line in the forest—geologists call it a trimline—generally extended to an elevation of 700 feet (200 meters) around much of the bay. On one ridge opposite the slide, waves splashed up to an elevation of 1,720 feet (524 meters)—taller than New York’s Empire State Building. The event at Lituya Bay still stands as one of the tallest tsunami waves known to science. The photo above, taken in 1958 after the tsunami, shows the ring of damage around much of the bay.

Evidence of the cataclysmic wave is still visible from space more than 60 years later. As seen in the false-color Landsat 8 image (bands 7-5-3) at the top of the page, the damaged trimline is still imprinted in the forest. The lighter green areas along the shore indicate places where forests are younger than older trees (darker areas) that were not affected by the tsunami. When the tsunami hit, it snapped all of the trees and scoured away almost all vegetation. Some 2 square miles (4 square kilometers) of forest were sheared and swept away by the tsunami waves.

 

westwall

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And there we have the trump cult, folks. But if we're gonna play, imagine ALL of Florida.




Ah heck, you assholes abort more than that in a ten year period. It's not like you actually care about people. 'Cause it's pretty clear you don't.
 

Old Rocks

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It hasn't? You sure about that? Below is one small incident that happened just a few decades ago. In the scientific world this is called an analog for what will eventually happen with the La Palma fault block.

Lituya Bay’s Apocalyptic Wave​


Eyewitness reports describe a chaotic and surreal scene: Intense shaking for several minutes, an explosive boom, and a shattered glacier soaring hundreds of feet into the air. Then a series of giant waves dotted with hunks of ice raced through the bay. One fisherman described his boat being lofted over a forested spit on the crest of one wave and looking down at trees below. The wave obliterated a cabin on Cenotaph island and swept away a lighthouse near the mouth of the bay. One couple that had been fishing when the wave hit were never heard from again.

The damage line in the forest—geologists call it a trimline—generally extended to an elevation of 700 feet (200 meters) around much of the bay. On one ridge opposite the slide, waves splashed up to an elevation of 1,720 feet (524 meters)—taller than New York’s Empire State Building. The event at Lituya Bay still stands as one of the tallest tsunami waves known to science. The photo above, taken in 1958 after the tsunami, shows the ring of damage around much of the bay.

Evidence of the cataclysmic wave is still visible from space more than 60 years later. As seen in the false-color Landsat 8 image (bands 7-5-3) at the top of the page, the damaged trimline is still imprinted in the forest. The lighter green areas along the shore indicate places where forests are younger than older trees (darker areas) that were not affected by the tsunami. When the tsunami hit, it snapped all of the trees and scoured away almost all vegetation. Some 2 square miles (4 square kilometers) of forest were sheared and swept away by the tsunami waves.

Westwall sure as fuck is no geologist. No geology student past year one would compare a slide in an enclosed straight to one in the open ocean. Yes, a very large slide, such as has happened in the Hawaiian Islands would put a tsunami completely across an ocean. However, it takes a very large slide. And comparing that wave to one in an enclosed basin is nonsense.

1632757457159.png
 

westwall

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Westwall sure as fuck is no geologist. No geology student past year one would compare a slide in an enclosed straight to one in the open ocean. Yes, a very large slide, such as has happened in the Hawaiian Islands would put a tsunami completely across an ocean. However, it takes a very large slide. And comparing that wave to one in an enclosed basin is nonsense.

View attachment 544439



Oh? Why. Be specific.
 

Old Rocks

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Oh? Why. Be specific.
When you throw a rock in a large body of water, you see the circular wave moving out from the point of impact. A wave that decreases in height as it spreads as the energy is distributed over a larger area. In an enclosed area, the energy is not spread out. While a large movement, slide, subduction quake, happens the wave is very high near the source and lowers in height as the energy decreases as it spreads out from the source. The math for this is known, and complex.
 

westwall

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When you throw a rock in a large body of water, you see the circular wave moving out from the point of impact. A wave that decreases in height as it spreads as the energy is distributed over a larger area. In an enclosed area, the energy is not spread out. While a large movement, slide, subduction quake, happens the wave is very high near the source and lowers in height as the energy decreases as it spreads out from the source. The math for this is known, and complex.




Mmmm, might want to recheck what happens when a large block moves under water.
 

Old Rocks

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Mmmm, might want to recheck what happens when a large block moves under water.
The volume of that large block is the crux of the matter. What created that wave in Lituya Bay would have been insignificant to anyone not in the immediate area in the open ocean. You are way off base here, and I fail to see how anyone with any training in geology could even entertain comparing what happened in Lituya Bay to a slide in the open ocean.
 

westwall

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The volume of that large block is the crux of the matter. What created that wave in Lituya Bay would have been insignificant to anyone not in the immediate area in the open ocean. You are way off base here, and I fail to see how anyone with any training in geology could even entertain comparing what happened in Lituya Bay to a slide in the open ocean.



Untrue. You are only paying attention to the splash. The actual wave produced was over 200 feet high.

When it made it to the open ocean it destroyed one fishing boat, and damaged another.

And, as I specified, it is an analog. In other words, a small scale example of what would happen when the La Palma fracture let's go.

You are being argumentative simply because you are an uneducated troll.
 

Stryder50

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Yes, the East Coast cities would get hammered. Same as the West Coast cities if the Cascadia Subduction Zone lets loose, or the slide on the big island of Hawaii moves. None likely to happen in our lifetime, but there is always a chance that one of the other will.
Mount St. Helens. Just over 40 years ago and within my lifetime.
Then there's Baker, Rainier, Hood, or St. Helens again.
Move out here to the PNW and share our risk.
 

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