What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

how gravity works

Colin norris

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,442
Points
893
Don't tell me Newton wasn't a Jesus junkie

I never suggested he was and incidently he was an atheist. There a few quotations out there that might suggest otherwise, bu they were attributed to him by religion searching for relevance to science.
 

james bond

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
1,311
Points
170

Colin norris

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,442
Points
893
He and Sir Frances Bacon both thought technology would advance before the end times. I do, too. BTW, ignore Colin norris; he's a troll.

A troll is someone who has a differing opinion and you can't refute his claims.
Sound familiar?

You were implying Newton was a godbotherer. He was not and you know it.

Don't attack me on religion. I'm very good at that and yet to be defeated by ignorant Jesus junkies like you. Your religion and beliefs at completely devoid of any truth.
You've been conned by the oldest trick known to man.
 

james bond

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
1,311
Points
170
Here are some of the ways technology has been predicted to rise in the book Future Shock by Alvin Toffler in 1970.

"

Future shock[edit]​

Alvin Toffler argued that society is undergoing an enormous structural change, a revolution from an industrial society to a "super-industrial society". This change overwhelms people. He argues that the accelerated rate of technological and social change leaves people disconnected and suffering from "shattering stress and disorientation"—future shocked. Toffler stated that the majority of social problems are symptoms of future shock. In his discussion of the components of such shock he popularized the term "information overload."

This analysis of the phenomenon of information overload is continued in later publications, especially The Third Wave and Powershift.

In the introduction to an essay entitled "Future Shock" in his book, Conscientious Objections, Neil Postman wrote:

"Sometime about the middle of 1963, my colleague Charles Weingartner and I delivered in tandem an address to the National Council of Teachers of English. In that address we used the phrase "future shock" as a way of describing the social paralysis induced by rapid technological change. To my knowledge, Weingartner and I were the first people ever to use it in a public forum. Of course, neither Weingartner nor I had the brains to write a book called Future Shock, and all due credit goes to Alvin Toffler for having recognized a good phrase when one came along" (p. 162).

Development of society and production[edit]​

Alvin Toffler distinguished three stages in development of society and production: agrarian, industrial and post-industrial.

Each of these waves develops its own "super-ideology” in order to explain reality. This ideology affects all the spheres which make up a civilization phase: technology, social patterns, information patterns, and power patterns.

The first stage began in the period of the Neolithic Era with the advent of agriculture, thereby passing from barbarity to a civilization. A large number of people acted as prosumers (eating their grown food, hunting animals, building their own houses, making clothes,....). People traded by exchanging their own goods for commodities of others. The second stage began in England with the Industrial Revolution with the invention of the machine tool and the steam engine. People worked in factories to make money they could spend on goods they needed (it means they produced for exchange, not for use). Countries also created new social systems. The third stage began in the second half of the 20th century in the West when people invented automatic production, robotics and the computer. The services sector attained great value.

Toffler proposed one criterion for distinguishing between industrial society and post-industrial society: the share of the population occupied in agriculture versus the share of city labor occupied in the services sector. In a post-industrial society, the share of the people occupied in agriculture does not exceed 15%, and the share of city laborers occupied in the services sector exceeds 50%. Thus, the share of the people occupied with brainwork greatly exceeds the share of the people occupied with physical work in post-industrial society.

The third wave led to the Information Era (now). Homes are the dominant institutions. Most people carry on their own production and consumption in their homes or electronic cottages, they produce more of their own products and services and markets become less important for them. People consider each other to be equally free as vendors of prosumer-generated commodities.

Fear of the future[edit]​


Midtown Manhattan in New York City, the largest central business district in the United States
Alvin Toffler's main thought centers on the idea that modern man feels shock from rapid changes. For example, Toffler's daughter went to shop in New York City and she couldn't find a shop in its previous location. Thus New York has become a city without a history. The urban population doubles every 11 years. The overall production of goods and services doubles each 50 years in developed countries. Society experiences an increasing number of changes with an increasing rapidity, while people are losing the familiarity that old institutions (religion, family, national identity, profession) once provided. The so-called "brain drain" – the emigration of European scientists to the United States – is both an indicator of the changes in society and also one of their causes.

Features of post-industrial society[edit]​

40px-Edit-clear.svg.png
This section is in list format, but may read better as prose. You can help by converting this section, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (October 2020)

A generic, disposable lighter.
  • Many goods have become disposable as the cost of manual repair or cleaning has become greater than the cost of making new goods due to mass production. Examples of disposable goods include ballpoint pens, lighters, plastic bottles, and paper towels.
  • The design of goods becomes outdated quickly. (And so, for example, a second generation of computers appears before the end of the expected period of usability of the first generation). It is possible to rent almost everything (from a ladder to a wedding dress), thus eliminating the need for ownership.
  • Whole branches of industry die off and new branches of industry arise. This affects unskilled workers who are compelled to change their residence to find new jobs. The constant change in the market also poses a problem for advertisers who must deal with moving targets.
  • People of post-industrial society change their profession and their workplace often. People have to change professions because professions quickly become outdated. People of post-industrial society thus have many careers in a lifetime. The knowledge of an engineer becomes outdated in ten years. People look more and more for temporary jobs.
  • To follow transient jobs, people have become nomads. For example, immigrants from Algeria, Turkey and other countries go to Europe to find work. Transient people are forced to change residence, phone number, school, friends, car license, and contact with family often. As a result, relationships tend to be superficial with a large number of people, instead of being intimate or close relationships that are more stable. Evidence for this is tourist travel and holiday romances.
  • The driver's license, received at age 16, has become the teenager's admission to the world of adults, because it symbolizes the ability to move independently.
  • Death of Permanence. The post industrial society will be marked by a transient culture where everything ranging from goods to human relationships will be temporary."
 

Colin norris

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,442
Points
893
Here are some of the ways technology has been predicted to rise in the book Future Shock by Alvin Toffler in 1970.

"

Future shock[edit]​

Alvin Toffler argued that society is undergoing an enormous structural change, a revolution from an industrial society to a "super-industrial society". This change overwhelms people. He argues that the accelerated rate of technological and social change leaves people disconnected and suffering from "shattering stress and disorientation"—future shocked. Toffler stated that the majority of social problems are symptoms of future shock. In his discussion of the components of such shock he popularized the term "information overload."

This analysis of the phenomenon of information overload is continued in later publications, especially The Third Wave and Powershift.

In the introduction to an essay entitled "Future Shock" in his book, Conscientious Objections, Neil Postman wrote:


Development of society and production[edit]​

Alvin Toffler distinguished three stages in development of society and production: agrarian, industrial and post-industrial.

Each of these waves develops its own "super-ideology” in order to explain reality. This ideology affects all the spheres which make up a civilization phase: technology, social patterns, information patterns, and power patterns.

The first stage began in the period of the Neolithic Era with the advent of agriculture, thereby passing from barbarity to a civilization. A large number of people acted as prosumers (eating their grown food, hunting animals, building their own houses, making clothes,....). People traded by exchanging their own goods for commodities of others. The second stage began in England with the Industrial Revolution with the invention of the machine tool and the steam engine. People worked in factories to make money they could spend on goods they needed (it means they produced for exchange, not for use). Countries also created new social systems. The third stage began in the second half of the 20th century in the West when people invented automatic production, robotics and the computer. The services sector attained great value.

Toffler proposed one criterion for distinguishing between industrial society and post-industrial society: the share of the population occupied in agriculture versus the share of city labor occupied in the services sector. In a post-industrial society, the share of the people occupied in agriculture does not exceed 15%, and the share of city laborers occupied in the services sector exceeds 50%. Thus, the share of the people occupied with brainwork greatly exceeds the share of the people occupied with physical work in post-industrial society.

The third wave led to the Information Era (now). Homes are the dominant institutions. Most people carry on their own production and consumption in their homes or electronic cottages, they produce more of their own products and services and markets become less important for them. People consider each other to be equally free as vendors of prosumer-generated commodities.

Fear of the future[edit]​


Midtown Manhattan in New York City, the largest central business district in the United States
Alvin Toffler's main thought centers on the idea that modern man feels shock from rapid changes. For example, Toffler's daughter went to shop in New York City and she couldn't find a shop in its previous location. Thus New York has become a city without a history. The urban population doubles every 11 years. The overall production of goods and services doubles each 50 years in developed countries. Society experiences an increasing number of changes with an increasing rapidity, while people are losing the familiarity that old institutions (religion, family, national identity, profession) once provided. The so-called "brain drain" – the emigration of European scientists to the United States – is both an indicator of the changes in society and also one of their causes.

Features of post-industrial society[edit]​

40px-Edit-clear.svg.png
This section is in list format, but may read better as prose. You can help by converting this section, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (October 2020)

A generic, disposable lighter.
  • Many goods have become disposable as the cost of manual repair or cleaning has become greater than the cost of making new goods due to mass production. Examples of disposable goods include ballpoint pens, lighters, plastic bottles, and paper towels.
  • The design of goods becomes outdated quickly. (And so, for example, a second generation of computers appears before the end of the expected period of usability of the first generation). It is possible to rent almost everything (from a ladder to a wedding dress), thus eliminating the need for ownership.
  • Whole branches of industry die off and new branches of industry arise. This affects unskilled workers who are compelled to change their residence to find new jobs. The constant change in the market also poses a problem for advertisers who must deal with moving targets.
  • People of post-industrial society change their profession and their workplace often. People have to change professions because professions quickly become outdated. People of post-industrial society thus have many careers in a lifetime. The knowledge of an engineer becomes outdated in ten years. People look more and more for temporary jobs.
  • To follow transient jobs, people have become nomads. For example, immigrants from Algeria, Turkey and other countries go to Europe to find work. Transient people are forced to change residence, phone number, school, friends, car license, and contact with family often. As a result, relationships tend to be superficial with a large number of people, instead of being intimate or close relationships that are more stable. Evidence for this is tourist travel and holiday romances.
  • The driver's license, received at age 16, has become the teenager's admission to the world of adults, because it symbolizes the ability to move independently.
  • Death of Permanence. The post industrial society will be marked by a transient culture where everything ranging from goods to human relationships will be temporary."

How does any of that irrelevant prove there's a god or that he objects to abortion?
If you get a warm inner glow from it son knock yourself out.

The point is skinned you so now you divert as if its relevant.
You've got nothing and know nothing. Not a good grounding for a belief in some celestial ghost.


Have another swing.
 

rupol2000

VIP Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2021
Messages
1,771
Reaction score
271
Points
63
I never suggested he was and incidently he was an atheist. There a few quotations out there that might suggest otherwise, bu they were attributed to him by religion searching for relevance to science.
He was a Christian priest
 

Grumblenuts

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
7,441
Reaction score
1,913
Points
140
Until we see the the compelling published research, we can correctly call them hypotheses only.
Your "we""we" is showing again. Do get over yourself. I heard you the first time and you've heard my response. Published Aether theory has compelled far more for far longer than Einstein's "warped space" silliness.
 

Colin norris

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,442
Points
893

Here is a quote from his bio on wiki.

Newton was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout but unorthodox Christian who privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity

Christian priests believe in that for it rubbish. He didn't nor was he a priest.

Get some facts.
 

Mikey G

Diamond Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
32,953
Reaction score
16,618
Points
1,915
Location
_Arkansas~_The Natural State_
:icon_sjung::auiqs.jpg:
 

james bond

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
1,311
Points
170
Have another swing. It doesn't matter. Anyone who doesn't understand the OVERWHELMING scientific evidence for the global flood is the SFE and POS.
 

Colin norris

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,442
Points
893
I reiterate what you said about the science. But you shouldn't belt yourself like the other bits.
 

Hollie

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Messages
41,652
Reaction score
5,888
Points
1,830
Have another swing. It doesn't matter. Anyone who doesn't understand the OVERWHELMING scientific evidence for the global flood is the SFE and POS.

There is no evidence for a global flood 4,000 years ago.

Claiming that everyone who doesn't believe your religious dogma is a POS is pretty typical for the worst kind of religious kooks.
 

james bond

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
1,311
Points
170
There is no evidence for a global flood 4,000 years ago.

Claiming that everyone who doesn't believe your religious dogma is a POS is pretty typical for the worst kind of religious kooks.
LMAO. Another SFE. Show me another planet that has 3/4 surface water and that was one land mass, but broke up into continents.
 

james bond

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
1,311
Points
170
I reiterate what you said about the science. But you shouldn't belt yourself like the other bits.
There wasn't anything about science you iterated to begin with. It showed you know nothing about gravity. I understand b/c you're SFE and POS.
 
OP
trevorjohnson32

trevorjohnson32

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
117
Reaction score
24
Points
56
Is anyone disputing the OP anymore? I think we've determined that it s a solid top view of the famous Einstein experiment. anyone argue? And that the top view is more valid then the side view or bending. Agree?
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$142.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top