BBQ, here France it is pretty boring !

HereWeGoAgain

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I generally dont use rubs on my brisket.
Just salt and pepper Central Texas style. For chicken and pork I like to experiment.
I'll have to check out those pellets,I've tried several brands and they've all performed about the same.
Well make sure your rig doesn't have one of those PID things because if it does I don't think it will matter. It takes a little temperature swing for a pellet rig to produce any smoke. If your rig holds temperature really tight say a degree or two, it likely has a PID loop controlling temperature and you need to address that before you go wasting your money on pellets and so called smoke generators.
I can set it on smoke and it produces a crapload of it.
It just doesnt taste the same or smell the same.
You can immediately tell the difference between a pellet smoker and a stick burner by the smell alone while they're running,and with smell being a big part of taste it just seems off a bit.

With the stick burner it's obvious with one sniff as to what wood is being used,not so much with the pellet pooper unless you're using something like mesquite.
If it has a smoke setting then my guess it has a PID controller but as you know, you don't want clouds of smoke but TBS thin blue smoke. But maybe a change of pellets will help. I use the competition blend most but they have other wood choices too, apple, mesquite, pecan, cherry, hickory etc. Ive heard Lumberjack is good too but i haven't tried them because I'm happy with what I'm using. That's because they produce very little ash and there's very little sawdust. They use oak for base wood, white oak or what you texas boys call post oak.
And there lies the quandary.
Thick billowing smoke or thin blue smoke.
If I go with a higher temp to get the thin blue smoke which is around 250 I lose smoke flavor.

The stick burner runs clean as all get out,to the point you cant see any smoke at times yet you get a great smoke profile.

Cant remember the name of the damn thing but there's a pitt out there that works like the puck smokers but uses actual logs.
Kinda the best of both worlds.
Well like I said I suspect your problem lies with the controller.
I said I wouldnt but I will anyway. What happens with a PID controller is that it's so intent on holding the temperature under tight control that's all it does to the expence of anything else. What it dies in order to maintain the temperature within a degree or two is to dribble a few pellets at a time into a larger blaze. As you know this doesn't allow the pellet to smoulder and smoke before it lights off and produces the heat the controller wants to maintain your target temperature.
However if you use a controller that allows a little hysteresis or swing here's what happens. The temp drops to the low setpoint and the controller feeds more pellets into a much smaller blaze in the fire pot. Of couse the larger load of pellets are going to take awhile before igniting so they smoulder and smoke a bit before lighting off and jacking the temperature up so the controller sees the high point and stops feeding pellets so the blaze dies down, the temperature drops to the low setpoint again and the cycle repeats. Overall you get more smoke of the right kind and your end results are much better.
As you know a lot of people think billowing clouds of white smoke is good but both you and I know better but maybe not the guy who programmed your temperature controller. Maybe you want to look into it.
I understand the pitfalls of the PID.
Thats why I use the pellet tubes,they basically accomplish the same thing as a non PID controller.
Light up one end and it'll burn for 2 hours then start the second.
In most cases 4 hours of smoke is plenty even in a large brisket.
For things like chicken and fish where I dont care for a heavy smoke it works just fine without the tubes.
It falls on its face when it comes to a brisket or pork butt where you need a lot of smoke.

The MAK does make great low temp smoked cheeses in the offset box although the only way to use it in the Texas heat during the summer is with a tray full of ice as cheese melts past 90 degrees which would be considered a cool day in the summer around here.

Have you tried a Kamado yet?
I always brushed it off as kind of gimmicky.
But after doing some research I bit the bullet and picked one up.
I was surprised to say the least,you can low smoke,although not to the level of an offset,you can sear up to 700 degrees,they make kickass pizzas and the fuel consumption is ridiculously low.
You just load it full of lump charcoal no matter if you're cooking a brisket or some chicken wings. The temp control is amazingly easy and accurate using the vents,it'll hold within 5 degrees for hours on end. Once your done you shut off the vents and it smothers the charcoal saving it for your next two or three cooks.
And clean up is a breeze. The next time you go to fire it up you shake the charcoal basket and all the old ash goes into the ash pan. Pull the pan and dump it and fire it up again. You can cook two whole chickens and end up with a 1/4 cup of ash.
It's now my go to cooker if I'm not smoking or if I want mild smoke.

IMG_3440.JPG
 

Lewdog

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Well, one day I would like to have at home at Lyon or in Normandy all the cowboys for a real western BBQ evening. LOL

View attachment 275398





There are a couple important things for a GOOD BBQ meal. First, peel the membrane off the back of the ribs. Second, use a very good rub. Third, bake them first in a bag that holds the moisture... then the last thing to do is throw them on the grill with brushing on some really good BBQ sauce making sure to wait until the sauce caramelizes a bit. Sounds like a lot of work but it makes awesome ribs that will just fall off the bone.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Well make sure your rig doesn't have one of those PID things because if it does I don't think it will matter. It takes a little temperature swing for a pellet rig to produce any smoke. If your rig holds temperature really tight say a degree or two, it likely has a PID loop controlling temperature and you need to address that before you go wasting your money on pellets and so called smoke generators.
I can set it on smoke and it produces a crapload of it.
It just doesnt taste the same or smell the same.
You can immediately tell the difference between a pellet smoker and a stick burner by the smell alone while they're running,and with smell being a big part of taste it just seems off a bit.

With the stick burner it's obvious with one sniff as to what wood is being used,not so much with the pellet pooper unless you're using something like mesquite.
If it has a smoke setting then my guess it has a PID controller but as you know, you don't want clouds of smoke but TBS thin blue smoke. But maybe a change of pellets will help. I use the competition blend most but they have other wood choices too, apple, mesquite, pecan, cherry, hickory etc. Ive heard Lumberjack is good too but i haven't tried them because I'm happy with what I'm using. That's because they produce very little ash and there's very little sawdust. They use oak for base wood, white oak or what you texas boys call post oak.
And there lies the quandary.
Thick billowing smoke or thin blue smoke.
If I go with a higher temp to get the thin blue smoke which is around 250 I lose smoke flavor.

The stick burner runs clean as all get out,to the point you cant see any smoke at times yet you get a great smoke profile.

Cant remember the name of the damn thing but there's a pitt out there that works like the puck smokers but uses actual logs.
Kinda the best of both worlds.
Well like I said I suspect your problem lies with the controller.
I said I wouldnt but I will anyway. What happens with a PID controller is that it's so intent on holding the temperature under tight control that's all it does to the expence of anything else. What it dies in order to maintain the temperature within a degree or two is to dribble a few pellets at a time into a larger blaze. As you know this doesn't allow the pellet to smoulder and smoke before it lights off and produces the heat the controller wants to maintain your target temperature.
However if you use a controller that allows a little hysteresis or swing here's what happens. The temp drops to the low setpoint and the controller feeds more pellets into a much smaller blaze in the fire pot. Of couse the larger load of pellets are going to take awhile before igniting so they smoulder and smoke a bit before lighting off and jacking the temperature up so the controller sees the high point and stops feeding pellets so the blaze dies down, the temperature drops to the low setpoint again and the cycle repeats. Overall you get more smoke of the right kind and your end results are much better.
As you know a lot of people think billowing clouds of white smoke is good but both you and I know better but maybe not the guy who programmed your temperature controller. Maybe you want to look into it.
I understand the pitfalls of the PID.
Thats why I use the pellet tubes,they basically accomplish the same thing as a non PID controller.
Light up one end and it'll burn for 2 hours then start the second.
In most cases 4 hours of smoke is plenty even in a large brisket.
For things like chicken and fish where I dont care for a heavy smoke it works just fine without the tubes.
It falls on its face when it comes to a brisket or pork butt where you need a lot of smoke.

The MAK does make great low temp smoked cheeses in the offset box although the only way to use it in the Texas heat during the summer is with a tray full of ice as cheese melts past 90 degrees which would be considered a cool day in the summer around here.

Have you tried a Kamado yet?
I always brushed it off as kind of gimmicky.
But after doing some research I bit the bullet and picked one up.
I was surprised to say the least,you can low smoke,although not to the level of an offset,you can sear up to 700 degrees,they make kickass pizzas and the fuel consumption is ridiculously low.
You just load it full of lump charcoal no matter if you're cooking a brisket or some chicken wings. The temp control is amazingly easy and accurate using the vents,it'll hold within 5 degrees for hours on end. Once your done you shut off the vents and it smothers the charcoal saving it for your next two or three cooks.
And clean up is a breeze. The next time you go to fire it up you shake the charcoal basket and all the old ash goes into the ash pan. Pull the pan and dump it and fire it up again. You can cook two whole chickens and end up with a 1/4 cup of ash.
It's now my go to cooker if I'm not smoking or if I want mild smoke.

View attachment 275534
My three favorites are the Lang reverse flow,the Kamado and the MAK.
If I had to get rid of one it'd be the MAK,if I had to choose between the Lang and the Kamado i'd be hard pressed to make a choice.
If you put a gun to my head I think I'd have to go with the Kamado just for its versatility.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Well, one day I would like to have at home at Lyon or in Normandy all the cowboys for a real western BBQ evening. LOL

View attachment 275398





There are a couple important things for a GOOD BBQ meal. First, peel the membrane off the back of the ribs. Second, use a very good rub. Third, bake them first in a bag that holds the moisture... then the last thing to do is throw them on the grill with brushing on some really good BBQ sauce making sure to wait until the sauce caramelizes a bit. Sounds like a lot of work but it makes awesome ribs that will just fall off the bone.
Most of that is subjective.
Are you doing baby backs or beef ribs? Baby backs have plenty of fat so they wont dry out unless you get stupid with the cook time or temp.
With beef ribs you can add a pan of water to your cooker to keep up the moisture levels.

And of course there's the spritzing bottle method which I mainly use.
Just hit em with some water or coke with apple juice or whatever floats your boat to keep em moist and to slow the cook time so they get more tender.

I can go either way as far as sauce goes. Naked or sauced is good with me depending on my mood.

And if they're falling off the bone you done over cooked em...

Do the bend test along with the pull away from the end of the bone.
They should have started to pull away at the end of the bone and when you pick them up in the middle they should start to break leaving cracks but not fall apart.
When you take a bite they should be tender but still stick to the bone. Ya dont want a mouthful of rib in one bite.

Of course thats the competition description of perfect ribs but ya can do em anyway you like.
 

Dick Foster

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Well make sure your rig doesn't have one of those PID things because if it does I don't think it will matter. It takes a little temperature swing for a pellet rig to produce any smoke. If your rig holds temperature really tight say a degree or two, it likely has a PID loop controlling temperature and you need to address that before you go wasting your money on pellets and so called smoke generators.
I can set it on smoke and it produces a crapload of it.
It just doesnt taste the same or smell the same.
You can immediately tell the difference between a pellet smoker and a stick burner by the smell alone while they're running,and with smell being a big part of taste it just seems off a bit.

With the stick burner it's obvious with one sniff as to what wood is being used,not so much with the pellet pooper unless you're using something like mesquite.
If it has a smoke setting then my guess it has a PID controller but as you know, you don't want clouds of smoke but TBS thin blue smoke. But maybe a change of pellets will help. I use the competition blend most but they have other wood choices too, apple, mesquite, pecan, cherry, hickory etc. Ive heard Lumberjack is good too but i haven't tried them because I'm happy with what I'm using. That's because they produce very little ash and there's very little sawdust. They use oak for base wood, white oak or what you texas boys call post oak.
And there lies the quandary.
Thick billowing smoke or thin blue smoke.
If I go with a higher temp to get the thin blue smoke which is around 250 I lose smoke flavor.

The stick burner runs clean as all get out,to the point you cant see any smoke at times yet you get a great smoke profile.

Cant remember the name of the damn thing but there's a pitt out there that works like the puck smokers but uses actual logs.
Kinda the best of both worlds.
Well like I said I suspect your problem lies with the controller.
I said I wouldnt but I will anyway. What happens with a PID controller is that it's so intent on holding the temperature under tight control that's all it does to the expence of anything else. What it dies in order to maintain the temperature within a degree or two is to dribble a few pellets at a time into a larger blaze. As you know this doesn't allow the pellet to smoulder and smoke before it lights off and produces the heat the controller wants to maintain your target temperature.
However if you use a controller that allows a little hysteresis or swing here's what happens. The temp drops to the low setpoint and the controller feeds more pellets into a much smaller blaze in the fire pot. Of couse the larger load of pellets are going to take awhile before igniting so they smoulder and smoke a bit before lighting off and jacking the temperature up so the controller sees the high point and stops feeding pellets so the blaze dies down, the temperature drops to the low setpoint again and the cycle repeats. Overall you get more smoke of the right kind and your end results are much better.
As you know a lot of people think billowing clouds of white smoke is good but both you and I know better but maybe not the guy who programmed your temperature controller. Maybe you want to look into it.
I understand the pitfalls of the PID.
Thats why I use the pellet tubes,they basically accomplish the same thing as a non PID controller.
Light up one end and it'll burn for 2 hours then start the second.
In most cases 4 hours of smoke is plenty even in a large brisket.
For things like chicken and fish where I dont care for a heavy smoke it works just fine without the tubes.
It falls on its face when it comes to a brisket or pork butt where you need a lot of smoke.

The MAK does make great low temp smoked cheeses in the offset box although the only way to use it in the Texas heat during the summer is with a tray full of ice as cheese melts past 90 degrees which would be considered a cool day in the summer around here.

Have you tried a Kamado yet?
I always brushed it off as kind of gimmicky.
But after doing some research I bit the bullet and picked one up.
I was surprised to say the least,you can low smoke,although not to the level of an offset,you can sear up to 700 degrees,they make kickass pizzas and the fuel consumption is ridiculously low.
You just load it full of lump charcoal no matter if you're cooking a brisket or some chicken wings. The temp control is amazingly easy and accurate using the vents,it'll hold within 5 degrees for hours on end. Once your done you shut off the vents and it smothers the charcoal saving it for your next two or three cooks.
And clean up is a breeze. The next time you go to fire it up you shake the charcoal basket and all the old ash goes into the ash pan. Pull the pan and dump it and fire it up again. You can cook two whole chickens and end up with a 1/4 cup of ash.
It's now my go to cooker if I'm not smoking or if I want mild smoke.

View attachment 275534
That never made any sense to me, use pellets to generate heat but no smoke and more pellets just to make smoke. I'm sure you can see the insanely there. Just see if you can tinker and fiddle a bit with your controller to get a little more swing out it and you'll get that flavor you're looking for, I do so I know you can too.
Grilla, the folks who made my rig, just introduced a dual mode controller where you have a choice at the touch of a button. PID or their normal mode with temperature swing but the TBS you're looking for. They did this only beacuse of the insanity and ignorance that pervails in the marketplace and their business is selling product so they gotta sell what people want whether or not they need it. At least you get the choice. I chose not to upgrade my controller to the PID BS simply because its useless and misplaced in a smoker and isn't worth the 100 dollar price tag to get something I don't need or want. Should I ever decide to use my smoker to cook up a batch of nitro or something requiring tight temperature control, I'll buy it.
 

Lewdog

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Well, one day I would like to have at home at Lyon or in Normandy all the cowboys for a real western BBQ evening. LOL

View attachment 275398





There are a couple important things for a GOOD BBQ meal. First, peel the membrane off the back of the ribs. Second, use a very good rub. Third, bake them first in a bag that holds the moisture... then the last thing to do is throw them on the grill with brushing on some really good BBQ sauce making sure to wait until the sauce caramelizes a bit. Sounds like a lot of work but it makes awesome ribs that will just fall off the bone.
Most of that is subjective.
Are you doing baby backs or beef ribs? Baby backs have plenty of fat so they wont dry out unless you get stupid with the cook time or temp.
With beef ribs you can add a pan of water to your cooker to keep up the moisture levels.

And of course there's the spritzing bottle method which I mainly use.
Just hit em with some water or coke with apple juice or whatever floats your boat to keep em moist and to slow the cook time so they get more tender.

I can go either way as far as sauce goes. Naked or sauced is good with me depending on my mood.

And if they're falling off the bone you done over cooked em...

Do the bend test along with the pull away from the end of the bone.
They should have started to pull away at the end of the bone and when you pick them up in the middle they should start to break leaving cracks but not fall apart.
When you take a bite they should be tender but still stick to the bone. Ya dont want a mouthful of rib in one bite.

Of course thats the competition description of perfect ribs but ya can do em anyway you like.

If I did the spritzer method I would probably use apple juice and Canada Dry. When I bake the ribs sealed up in a bag or in tin foil with water, I usually put ginger in with it. There is a definitely an art form to make the ribs soft enough to eat comfortably, and not over-done. I definitely prefer the cooking with sauce brushed on over naked, I think the BBQ sauce caramelized takes on a totally different flavor profile.

I used to play in a golf scramble every year where we also had a rib cooking contest. Me and a buddy pulled of the double win, winning the scramble with 2 other buddies, then also winning the rib contest. On top of all that, I think we won around $250 playing euchre as well. Was a pretty good day...
 

HereWeGoAgain

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
 

Lewdog

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
 

HereWeGoAgain

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
What really sucks about BBQ? And cooking in general these days.
I'm getting old and cant come close to my younger days when it comes to eating yet I still love doing it.
I'll cook a fifteen lb brisket and the Wife and I might eat four sandwiches out of it.
I give the rest to my Buddy and he takes it to work to feed the shop.
I just like to see how good I can make it,how much I can eat has become second to that.
Cracks me up,back in the day it was a rack of Baby Backs per person. Thats now cut in half....at best.
Like crawfish went from 16 lbs to to 6.....I mourn for my young appetite.
 

Lewdog

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
What really sucks about BBQ? And cooking in general these days.
I'm getting old and cant come close to my younger days when it comes to eating yet I still love doing it.
I'll cook a fifteen lb brisket and the Wife and I might eat four sandwiches out of it.
I give the rest to my Buddy and he takes it to work to feed the shop.
I just like to see how good I can make it,how much I can eat has become second to that.
Cracks me up,back in the day it was a rack of Baby Backs per person. Thats now cut in half....at best.
Like crawfish went from 16 lbs to to 6.....I mourn for my young appetite.
Yeah I live in apartment downtown so no place for a grill. I haven't been able to have one for years. Me and my friends used to grill out even in the dead of winter. Grilled meat is the best tasting meat there is, second being smoked, crock pot, then deep fried/skillet fried, then baked.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
What really sucks about BBQ? And cooking in general these days.
I'm getting old and cant come close to my younger days when it comes to eating yet I still love doing it.
I'll cook a fifteen lb brisket and the Wife and I might eat four sandwiches out of it.
I give the rest to my Buddy and he takes it to work to feed the shop.
I just like to see how good I can make it,how much I can eat has become second to that.
Cracks me up,back in the day it was a rack of Baby Backs per person. Thats now cut in half....at best.
Like crawfish went from 16 lbs to to 6.....I mourn for my young appetite.
Yeah I live in apartment downtown so no place for a grill. I haven't been able to have one for years. Me and my friends used to grill out even in the dead of winter. Grilled meat is the best tasting meat there is, second being smoked, crock pot, then deep fried/skillet fried, then baked.
Always lived in the burbs or the boonies so outdoor cooking was always on the table.
When I lived in the Texas Hill Country we'd burn a huge brush pile of cedar and mesquite turning it into coals.
We'd then bury a side of beef or pork overnight and dig it up around noon the next day.
Fantastic stuff!!!
 

Lewdog

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
What really sucks about BBQ? And cooking in general these days.
I'm getting old and cant come close to my younger days when it comes to eating yet I still love doing it.
I'll cook a fifteen lb brisket and the Wife and I might eat four sandwiches out of it.
I give the rest to my Buddy and he takes it to work to feed the shop.
I just like to see how good I can make it,how much I can eat has become second to that.
Cracks me up,back in the day it was a rack of Baby Backs per person. Thats now cut in half....at best.
Like crawfish went from 16 lbs to to 6.....I mourn for my young appetite.
Yeah I live in apartment downtown so no place for a grill. I haven't been able to have one for years. Me and my friends used to grill out even in the dead of winter. Grilled meat is the best tasting meat there is, second being smoked, crock pot, then deep fried/skillet fried, then baked.
Always lived in the burbs or the boonies so outdoor cooking was always on the table.
When I lived in the Texas Hill Country we'd burn a huge brush pile of cedar and mesquite turning it into coals.
We'd then bury a side of beef or pork overnight and dig it up around noon the next day.
Fantastic stuff!!!
I can't remember what show I was watching, but they took a goat and opened it up and took out some of the organs, then just took hot coals and put them inside the body and closed it back up... and after a couple hours it was all cooked. Of course you also can't beat a nice pig roast.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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What I really like about American BBQ is the myriad of ways to BBQ the same piece of meat in one geographical area.
Add the the different geographical variations like Carolina BBQ and Texas BBQ and the options become almost endless.
You could BBQ for a lifetime and not cover it all.

The Wife and I went on a Carolina Pork binge years back and we made a good 50 sauce/rub/marinade/injection recipes between the north and south variations. Some were great and others sucked.

Always searching for the Holy Grail.....
Yes the older I get the more I like the Carolina BBQ that has the more vinegar taste in it. I've also started eating Salt & Vinegar chips... which I HATED as a kid. You forgot Memphis BBQ & Kansas City BBQ as well. If I were to rank them, I'd go Carolina, Texas (which is a bit spicier), Memphis, then KC which is a bit too sweet for me. It is pretty wild for there to be so many different areas all of which has their own tastes.

There is a place I used to eat at a lot up in Ohio called City BBQ that has Carolina Pulled Pork sandwiches that obviously come with Carolina BBQ sauce, but also come with slaw on them, and a side of fries. I'd usually just put the fries on the sandwich too. :abgg2q.jpg:
What really sucks about BBQ? And cooking in general these days.
I'm getting old and cant come close to my younger days when it comes to eating yet I still love doing it.
I'll cook a fifteen lb brisket and the Wife and I might eat four sandwiches out of it.
I give the rest to my Buddy and he takes it to work to feed the shop.
I just like to see how good I can make it,how much I can eat has become second to that.
Cracks me up,back in the day it was a rack of Baby Backs per person. Thats now cut in half....at best.
Like crawfish went from 16 lbs to to 6.....I mourn for my young appetite.
Yeah I live in apartment downtown so no place for a grill. I haven't been able to have one for years. Me and my friends used to grill out even in the dead of winter. Grilled meat is the best tasting meat there is, second being smoked, crock pot, then deep fried/skillet fried, then baked.
Always lived in the burbs or the boonies so outdoor cooking was always on the table.
When I lived in the Texas Hill Country we'd burn a huge brush pile of cedar and mesquite turning it into coals.
We'd then bury a side of beef or pork overnight and dig it up around noon the next day.
Fantastic stuff!!!
I can't remember what show I was watching, but they took a goat and opened it up and took out some of the organs, then just took hot coals and put them inside the body and closed it back up... and after a couple hours it was all cooked. Of course you also can't beat a nice pig roast.
Used to do Barbacoa back in the day as well.
Wrap the head up in wet burlap and bury it over night.
It taste like very rich brisket,i'll never forget getting one of my nephews to eat an eyeball.
Told him they were a delicacy...of course I had to eat the first one and it took every bit of my strength not to gag or throw up.
He didnt have that control......
 
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Dalia

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The chonas BBQ looks like this, a bit of wood, paper, and charcoal underneath ... but cooking takes too much time if you have to cook a lot of food with this BBQ style, andt it goes so quickly. summer is soon over.

 

boedicca

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Thats a great sentiment!!!!
First thing you'll have to do. Learn what BBQ is.
BBQ is meat slow cooked by in direct heat usually between 220 f and 275 at most.
Large hunks of meat like a brisket can take 20 hours or more.
Your average yardbird takes around 4 hours as does a rack of baby backs.

With American BBQ spreading around the world there are now places in your own country that can come close to Texas traditional BBQ...
THE NEW WORLD SMOKE I Site officiel, avis, prix et réservation en ligne
Just remember....putting a hunk of meat over a fire or charcoal is not BBQ.

Indeed. Grilling is great, but BBQ is Mo Bettah!

Today we are smoking Babyback Ribs for our local fire house. It's a Labor Day weekend tradition.
 

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