A Judge Asked Harvard to Find Out Why So Many Black People Were In Prison. They Could Only Find 1 Answer: Systemic Racism

Redcurtain

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This article summarizes the research conducted at Harvard in order to undercover the reasons by so many black people in the state of Massachusetts were in prison. Their results are not surprising to any black person, however the most important thing about this research is that they have the data to backup their conclusions


It wasn’t Black-on-Black crime. Violent video games and rap songs had nothing to do with it; nor did poverty, education, two-parent homes or the international “bootstraps” shortage. When a judge tasked researchers with explaining why Massachusetts’ Black and Latinx incarceration was so high, a four-year study came up with one conclusion.​
Racism.​
It was always racism.​
According to 2016 data from the Massachusetts Sentencing Commission, 655 of every 100,000 Black people in Massachusetts are in prison. Meanwhile, the state locks up 82 of its white citizens for every 100,000 who reside in the state. While an eight-to-one racial disparity might seem like a lot for one criminal justice system, nationwide, African Americans are imprisoned at almost six times the rate of white people. So, in 2016, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants asked Harvard researchers to “take a hard look at how we can better fulfill our promise to provide equal justice for every litigant.”​
After gathering the raw numbers from nearly every government agency in the state’s criminal justice system, examining the data, and researching the disparate outcomes, Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Policy Program found that Black incarcerees received more severe charges, harsher sentences and less favorable outcomes than their white counterparts. They looked at more than a million cases, from the initial charges through the conviction and sentencing, and discovered disparities that could not be explained by logic or reason.​
“White people make up roughly 74% of the Massachusetts population while accounting for 58.7% of cases in our data,” the study explained. “Meanwhile, Black people make up just 6.5% of the Massachusetts population and account for 17.1% of cases.”​
Of course, that could only mean that Black people commit much more crime, right?​
Nope.​
OK, then maybe Black people commit worse crimes.​
That wasn’t it.​
What they found is the criminal justice system is unequal on every level. Cops in the state are more likely to stop Black drivers. Police are more likely to search or investigate Black residents. Law enforcement agents charge Black suspects with infractions that carry worse penalties. Prosecutors are less likely to offer Black suspects plea bargains or pre-trial intervention. Judges sentence Black defendants to longer terms in prison. And get this: The average white felon in the Massachusetts Department of Corrections has committed a more severe crime than the average Black inmate.​
The study, “Racial Disparities in the Massachusetts Criminal System” (pdf) unearthed a number of factors that contribute to these significant disparities, including:​
  • It’s not that Black people are criminals: It’s that the cops think Black people are criminals: For instance, despite making up only 24 percent of Boston’s population, Black people made up 63 percent of the civilians who were interrogated, stopped, frisked or searched by the BPD between 2007 and 2010. According to the researchers, this suggests “that the disparity in searches was more consistent with racial bias than with differences in criminal conduct.”
  • Black suspects don’t get bail: The average bail is slightly higher in cases involving Black defendants. Furthermore, more Black and Latinx defendants are detained without bail as compared to white defendants.
  • Black people are charged with higher offenses: But curiously, when they get to court, Black defendants are convicted of charges roughly equal in seriousness to their White counterparts despite facing more serious initial charges.
  • There are actually two separate systems: The study notes that prosecutors are more likely to exercise their discretion to send Black and Latinx people “to Superior Court where the available sentences are longer.”
  • And separate sentences: If you’re Black and charged with crimes carrying a mandatory minimum, you are substantially more likely to be incarcerated and receive a longer sentence.
  • Especially if they find drugs or guns on you: Black and Latinx people charged with drug offenses and weapons offenses are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer incarceration sentences than white people charged with similar offenses
  • Sentencing length: The average Black person’s sentence is 168 days longer than a sentence for a white person. Even when the researchers controlled for criminal history, jurisdiction, and neighborhood, they concluded: “[R]acial disparities in sentence length cannot solely be explained by the contextual factors that we consider and permeate the entire criminal justice process.”
The researchers even looked at poverty rates, the family structures of convicted felons and the neighborhoods they lived in. They eventually decided that the only reasonable explanation that explained the disparities was racism.​
One of the more interesting parts of the report juxtaposed people who possessed illegal firearms with people arrested for operating a vehicle under the influence (OUI). They reasoned that both acts are potentially dangerous but statistics show that driving under the influence actually causes much more harm to the public than simply carrying an unlicensed firearm. But, because white people make up 82 percent of people who are convicted of OUI, the state considers operating under the influence as a “public health problem,” so the charge is often resolved without a felony conviction. In fact, 77 percent of the people who don’t end up with a felony conviction after admitting that they operated a vehicle under the influence are white.​
However, despite Black defendants making up 16.4 percent of firearm cases in 2012, 46 percent of the people convicted of a firearm offense was Black. And 70.3 percent of the time, the Black person’s only offense was carrying a firearm without a license.​
Read the rest of the article here:​
Do you believe everything Harvard tells you?

I dont

black people commit crimes more frequently and in turn come to the attention of the police more often
I'd believe Harvard before I would believe some bullshit from the gateway pundit.

In 2018 according to the FBI Uniform Crime Reports, 3,315 whites were murdered. 2,925 blacks were murdered. 81 percent of all whites who were killed were killed by another white person. Even more important in debunking this lie of black attacks and killing is the fact that more whites killed each other (2677) than blacks who killed each other (2600).

There are 30 categories of crimes listed in the UCR. Murder is one category. In 2018, out of the 30 categories of crime, whites led in 27. Whites are approximately 70 percent of the population and led in 90 percent of the crime categories. Less than 1/2 of 1 percent of the deaths in America were murders. There were a total of 8957 murders in all races in 2018. There were over 12,000 arrest for rapes by whites in 2018 alone. Blacks had less than half that with 5,376. So we have whites here arguing an apparent racist argument. “What about white on white crime?”

Blacks are not responsible for 50 percent of crime in America. 14 percent of no race in this country is responsible for crime. Numbers represent people and by arrests, 2.5 percent of the American population were white and arrested for crimes in 2018. That 2.5 percent of the population made up 60 percent of the arrests for violent crime. Less than 1 percent of the of the American population was black and arrested for crimes in 2018. So whites made up more than double the arrests and that 2.5 percent of the American population made up nearly 70 percent of all arrests for crime.

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

You continue to overlook the fact that black people are only 13% of the population while whites are 69-70%

so blacks commit crimes at a far greater rate than their share of the population
No, Read this again.

Blacks are not responsible for 50 percent of crime in America. 14 percent of no race in this country is responsible for crime. Numbers represent people and by arrests, 2.5 percent of the American population were white and arrested for crimes in 2018. That 2.5 percent of the population made up 60 percent of the arrests for violent crime.

If you take the number of whites arrested and make them a percentage of the American population, you get just over 2.5 percent. I used the number of whites who were arrested only because entire populations are not responsible for crimes only those who participate in crime are.

Less than 1 percent of the of the American population was black and arrested for crimes in 2018. So whites made up more than double the arrests and that 2.5 percent of the American population made up nearly 70 percent of all arrests for crime.

If you take the number of blacks arrested and make them a percentage of the American population, you get just less than 1 percent. Approximately .0007 percent. Again I used the number of people arrested as a percentage of the US population. This issue is far too critical to be intellectually lazy about and that 13 percent excuse only considered when it pertains to crime is the height of intellectual laziness.
I saw 15 blacks go through red lights in a half hour then went to a white neighborhood and stood there for 3 hours and didn’t see one. Blacks are committing crime at a rate we never seen before and it needs to be addressed ignoring it will not help
 

Mac-7

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This article summarizes the research conducted at Harvard in order to undercover the reasons by so many black people in the state of Massachusetts were in prison. Their results are not surprising to any black person, however the most important thing about this research is that they have the data to backup their conclusions


It wasn’t Black-on-Black crime. Violent video games and rap songs had nothing to do with it; nor did poverty, education, two-parent homes or the international “bootstraps” shortage. When a judge tasked researchers with explaining why Massachusetts’ Black and Latinx incarceration was so high, a four-year study came up with one conclusion.​
Racism.​
It was always racism.​
According to 2016 data from the Massachusetts Sentencing Commission, 655 of every 100,000 Black people in Massachusetts are in prison. Meanwhile, the state locks up 82 of its white citizens for every 100,000 who reside in the state. While an eight-to-one racial disparity might seem like a lot for one criminal justice system, nationwide, African Americans are imprisoned at almost six times the rate of white people. So, in 2016, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants asked Harvard researchers to “take a hard look at how we can better fulfill our promise to provide equal justice for every litigant.”​
After gathering the raw numbers from nearly every government agency in the state’s criminal justice system, examining the data, and researching the disparate outcomes, Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Policy Program found that Black incarcerees received more severe charges, harsher sentences and less favorable outcomes than their white counterparts. They looked at more than a million cases, from the initial charges through the conviction and sentencing, and discovered disparities that could not be explained by logic or reason.​
“White people make up roughly 74% of the Massachusetts population while accounting for 58.7% of cases in our data,” the study explained. “Meanwhile, Black people make up just 6.5% of the Massachusetts population and account for 17.1% of cases.”​
Of course, that could only mean that Black people commit much more crime, right?​
Nope.​
OK, then maybe Black people commit worse crimes.​
That wasn’t it.​
What they found is the criminal justice system is unequal on every level. Cops in the state are more likely to stop Black drivers. Police are more likely to search or investigate Black residents. Law enforcement agents charge Black suspects with infractions that carry worse penalties. Prosecutors are less likely to offer Black suspects plea bargains or pre-trial intervention. Judges sentence Black defendants to longer terms in prison. And get this: The average white felon in the Massachusetts Department of Corrections has committed a more severe crime than the average Black inmate.​
The study, “Racial Disparities in the Massachusetts Criminal System” (pdf) unearthed a number of factors that contribute to these significant disparities, including:​
  • It’s not that Black people are criminals: It’s that the cops think Black people are criminals: For instance, despite making up only 24 percent of Boston’s population, Black people made up 63 percent of the civilians who were interrogated, stopped, frisked or searched by the BPD between 2007 and 2010. According to the researchers, this suggests “that the disparity in searches was more consistent with racial bias than with differences in criminal conduct.”
  • Black suspects don’t get bail: The average bail is slightly higher in cases involving Black defendants. Furthermore, more Black and Latinx defendants are detained without bail as compared to white defendants.
  • Black people are charged with higher offenses: But curiously, when they get to court, Black defendants are convicted of charges roughly equal in seriousness to their White counterparts despite facing more serious initial charges.
  • There are actually two separate systems: The study notes that prosecutors are more likely to exercise their discretion to send Black and Latinx people “to Superior Court where the available sentences are longer.”
  • And separate sentences: If you’re Black and charged with crimes carrying a mandatory minimum, you are substantially more likely to be incarcerated and receive a longer sentence.
  • Especially if they find drugs or guns on you: Black and Latinx people charged with drug offenses and weapons offenses are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer incarceration sentences than white people charged with similar offenses
  • Sentencing length: The average Black person’s sentence is 168 days longer than a sentence for a white person. Even when the researchers controlled for criminal history, jurisdiction, and neighborhood, they concluded: “[R]acial disparities in sentence length cannot solely be explained by the contextual factors that we consider and permeate the entire criminal justice process.”
The researchers even looked at poverty rates, the family structures of convicted felons and the neighborhoods they lived in. They eventually decided that the only reasonable explanation that explained the disparities was racism.​
One of the more interesting parts of the report juxtaposed people who possessed illegal firearms with people arrested for operating a vehicle under the influence (OUI). They reasoned that both acts are potentially dangerous but statistics show that driving under the influence actually causes much more harm to the public than simply carrying an unlicensed firearm. But, because white people make up 82 percent of people who are convicted of OUI, the state considers operating under the influence as a “public health problem,” so the charge is often resolved without a felony conviction. In fact, 77 percent of the people who don’t end up with a felony conviction after admitting that they operated a vehicle under the influence are white.​
However, despite Black defendants making up 16.4 percent of firearm cases in 2012, 46 percent of the people convicted of a firearm offense was Black. And 70.3 percent of the time, the Black person’s only offense was carrying a firearm without a license.​
Read the rest of the article here:​
Do you believe everything Harvard tells you?

I dont

black people commit crimes more frequently and in turn come to the attention of the police more often
  • It’s not that Black people are criminals: It’s that the cops think Black people are criminals: For instance, despite making up only 24 percent of Boston’s population, Black people made up 63 percent of the civilians who were interrogated, stopped, frisked or searched by the BPD between 2007 and 2010. According to the researchers, this suggests “that the disparity in searches was more consistent with racial bias than with differences in criminal conduct.”
you make it sound as if the cops seek out random innocent black people when in fact they are going where the criminals are known to be

if one zip code has 5 times the murder rate of another zip code it really does not matter what color live there

the cops are logically going to stop and frisk where most of the crime is taking place
 

Mac-7

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This article summarizes the research conducted at Harvard in order to undercover the reasons by so many black people in the state of Massachusetts were in prison. Their results are not surprising to any black person, however the most important thing about this research is that they have the data to backup their conclusions


It wasn’t Black-on-Black crime. Violent video games and rap songs had nothing to do with it; nor did poverty, education, two-parent homes or the international “bootstraps” shortage. When a judge tasked researchers with explaining why Massachusetts’ Black and Latinx incarceration was so high, a four-year study came up with one conclusion.​
Racism.​
It was always racism.​
According to 2016 data from the Massachusetts Sentencing Commission, 655 of every 100,000 Black people in Massachusetts are in prison. Meanwhile, the state locks up 82 of its white citizens for every 100,000 who reside in the state. While an eight-to-one racial disparity might seem like a lot for one criminal justice system, nationwide, African Americans are imprisoned at almost six times the rate of white people. So, in 2016, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants asked Harvard researchers to “take a hard look at how we can better fulfill our promise to provide equal justice for every litigant.”​
After gathering the raw numbers from nearly every government agency in the state’s criminal justice system, examining the data, and researching the disparate outcomes, Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Policy Program found that Black incarcerees received more severe charges, harsher sentences and less favorable outcomes than their white counterparts. They looked at more than a million cases, from the initial charges through the conviction and sentencing, and discovered disparities that could not be explained by logic or reason.​
“White people make up roughly 74% of the Massachusetts population while accounting for 58.7% of cases in our data,” the study explained. “Meanwhile, Black people make up just 6.5% of the Massachusetts population and account for 17.1% of cases.”​
Of course, that could only mean that Black people commit much more crime, right?​
Nope.​
OK, then maybe Black people commit worse crimes.​
That wasn’t it.​
What they found is the criminal justice system is unequal on every level. Cops in the state are more likely to stop Black drivers. Police are more likely to search or investigate Black residents. Law enforcement agents charge Black suspects with infractions that carry worse penalties. Prosecutors are less likely to offer Black suspects plea bargains or pre-trial intervention. Judges sentence Black defendants to longer terms in prison. And get this: The average white felon in the Massachusetts Department of Corrections has committed a more severe crime than the average Black inmate.​
The study, “Racial Disparities in the Massachusetts Criminal System” (pdf) unearthed a number of factors that contribute to these significant disparities, including:​
  • It’s not that Black people are criminals: It’s that the cops think Black people are criminals: For instance, despite making up only 24 percent of Boston’s population, Black people made up 63 percent of the civilians who were interrogated, stopped, frisked or searched by the BPD between 2007 and 2010. According to the researchers, this suggests “that the disparity in searches was more consistent with racial bias than with differences in criminal conduct.”
  • Black suspects don’t get bail: The average bail is slightly higher in cases involving Black defendants. Furthermore, more Black and Latinx defendants are detained without bail as compared to white defendants.
  • Black people are charged with higher offenses: But curiously, when they get to court, Black defendants are convicted of charges roughly equal in seriousness to their White counterparts despite facing more serious initial charges.
  • There are actually two separate systems: The study notes that prosecutors are more likely to exercise their discretion to send Black and Latinx people “to Superior Court where the available sentences are longer.”
  • And separate sentences: If you’re Black and charged with crimes carrying a mandatory minimum, you are substantially more likely to be incarcerated and receive a longer sentence.
  • Especially if they find drugs or guns on you: Black and Latinx people charged with drug offenses and weapons offenses are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer incarceration sentences than white people charged with similar offenses
  • Sentencing length: The average Black person’s sentence is 168 days longer than a sentence for a white person. Even when the researchers controlled for criminal history, jurisdiction, and neighborhood, they concluded: “[R]acial disparities in sentence length cannot solely be explained by the contextual factors that we consider and permeate the entire criminal justice process.”
The researchers even looked at poverty rates, the family structures of convicted felons and the neighborhoods they lived in. They eventually decided that the only reasonable explanation that explained the disparities was racism.​
One of the more interesting parts of the report juxtaposed people who possessed illegal firearms with people arrested for operating a vehicle under the influence (OUI). They reasoned that both acts are potentially dangerous but statistics show that driving under the influence actually causes much more harm to the public than simply carrying an unlicensed firearm. But, because white people make up 82 percent of people who are convicted of OUI, the state considers operating under the influence as a “public health problem,” so the charge is often resolved without a felony conviction. In fact, 77 percent of the people who don’t end up with a felony conviction after admitting that they operated a vehicle under the influence are white.​
However, despite Black defendants making up 16.4 percent of firearm cases in 2012, 46 percent of the people convicted of a firearm offense was Black. And 70.3 percent of the time, the Black person’s only offense was carrying a firearm without a license.​
Read the rest of the article here:​
Do you believe everything Harvard tells you?

I dont

black people commit crimes more frequently and in turn come to the attention of the police more often
I'd believe Harvard before I would believe some bullshit from the gateway pundit.

In 2018 according to the FBI Uniform Crime Reports, 3,315 whites were murdered. 2,925 blacks were murdered. 81 percent of all whites who were killed were killed by another white person. Even more important in debunking this lie of black attacks and killing is the fact that more whites killed each other (2677) than blacks who killed each other (2600).

There are 30 categories of crimes listed in the UCR. Murder is one category. In 2018, out of the 30 categories of crime, whites led in 27. Whites are approximately 70 percent of the population and led in 90 percent of the crime categories. Less than 1/2 of 1 percent of the deaths in America were murders. There were a total of 8957 murders in all races in 2018. There were over 12,000 arrest for rapes by whites in 2018 alone. Blacks had less than half that with 5,376. So we have whites here arguing an apparent racist argument. “What about white on white crime?”

Blacks are not responsible for 50 percent of crime in America. 14 percent of no race in this country is responsible for crime. Numbers represent people and by arrests, 2.5 percent of the American population were white and arrested for crimes in 2018. That 2.5 percent of the population made up 60 percent of the arrests for violent crime. Less than 1 percent of the of the American population was black and arrested for crimes in 2018. So whites made up more than double the arrests and that 2.5 percent of the American population made up nearly 70 percent of all arrests for crime.

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2018/crime-in-the-u.s.-2018/tables/table-43

You continue to overlook the fact that black people are only 13% of the population while whites are 69-70%

so blacks commit crimes at a far greater rate than their share of the population
No, Read this again.

Blacks are not responsible for 50 percent of crime in America. 14 percent of no race in this country is responsible for crime. Numbers represent people and by arrests, 2.5 percent of the American population were white and arrested for crimes in 2018. That 2.5 percent of the population made up 60 percent of the arrests for violent crime.

If you take the number of whites arrested and make them a percentage of the American population, you get just over 2.5 percent. I used the number of whites who were arrested only because entire populations are not responsible for crimes only those who participate in crime are.

Less than 1 percent of the of the American population was black and arrested for crimes in 2018. So whites made up more than double the arrests and that 2.5 percent of the American population made up nearly 70 percent of all arrests for crime.

If you take the number of blacks arrested and make them a percentage of the American population, you get just less than 1 percent. Approximately .0007 percent. Again I used the number of people arrested as a percentage of the US population. This issue is far too critical to be intellectually lazy about and that 13 percent excuse only considered when it pertains to crime is the height of intellectual laziness.
I’m not sure what you are trying to say.

the cops did not randomly seek out the black guy who was shot 7 times

he is a rapist who was violating a restraining order

it was another black person who called the cops for help

and that applies to most of the cases involving the cops whether the criminal is black or white
 

Juicey Omelette

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Hmmm..in 2016 Harvard also did this study finding that police aren't racist..



But then, that same year in the study from The Root link..found that they are racist? Wonder why that is?

Couldn't it possibly be that if you set out looking exclusively for racism (just like all our hate mongering anti white racists do on this board) you are going to find it?
 

Likkmee

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Hmmm..in 2016 Harvard also did this study finding that police aren't racist..



But then, that same year in the study from The Root link..found that they are racist? Wonder why that is?

Couldn't it possibly be that if you set out looking exclusively for racism (just like all our hate mongering anti white racists do on this board) you are going to find it?
Root link ?
 

Likkmee

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Hmmm..in 2016 Harvard also did this study finding that police aren't racist..



But then, that same year in the study from The Root link..found that they are racist? Wonder why that is?

Couldn't it possibly be that if you set out looking exclusively for racism (just like all our hate mongering anti white racists do on this board) you are going to find it?
Root link ?
Response to job offer..............LOL
 

justinacolmena

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Well, shoot. Some judge straight out of Tammany Hall sentenced all those black men to jail, and he's scratching his bald head wondering why so many of them are still there.
 
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NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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Couldn't it possibly be that if you set out looking exclusively for racism (just like all our hate mongering anti white racists do on this board) you are going to find it?
That's a valid point, they call that confirmation bias I believe, but that's not how this study was conducted, according to the article and what I know of compiling and reporting on data.

In a case such as this you would gather ALL of the SAME information regarding arrest, charging, conviction & sentencing data and put it into a database and see what it shows you. If the numbers come out differently than what you expect, in this case that black people are over represented in the prison system, then you add additional data from the SAME case files that will provide context to the existing data and keep doing so until you can see and explain the differences in the individual cases.

I haven't reread the article since the day I posted it but if I recall correctly the researchers first looked at poverty as an explanation for the discrepancies and were able to rule that out. They then systematically used the process of elimination (I don't recall the other criteria they used) until they were left with systemic racism as the only viable explanation.

It takes a lot of time and effort (and money) to review a million case files and compile all that data in a database, so I guess I was just expecting someone to actually disprove the results instead of simply responding with "is not ".
 

SavannahMann

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Couldn't it possibly be that if you set out looking exclusively for racism (just like all our hate mongering anti white racists do on this board) you are going to find it?
That's a valid point, they call that confirmation bias I believe, but that's not how this study was conducted, according to the article and what I know of compiling and reporting on data.

In a case such as this you would gather ALL of the SAME information regarding arrest, charging, conviction & sentencing data and put it into a database and see what it shows you. If the numbers come out differently than what you expect, in this case that black people are over represented in the prison system, then you add additional data from the SAME case files that will provide context to the existing data and keep doing so until you can see and explain the differences in the individual cases.

I haven't reread the article since the day I posted it but if I recall correctly the researchers first looked at poverty as an explanation for the discrepancies and were able to rule that out. They then systematically used the process of elimination (I don't recall the other criteria they used) until they were left with systemic racism as the only viable explanation.

It takes a lot of time and effort (and money) to review a million case files and compile all that data in a database, so I guess I was just expecting someone to actually disprove the results instead of simply responding with "is not ".
The problem is that the data is confirmed by other sources.


That focused on traffic stops. Just traffic stops. The results were telling. Daylight Blacks more likely to be pulled over. Night not so much. Blacks more likely to be searched. Whites more likely to have contraband. But still not searched more often.

In another thread I used the Red Car explanation. If you pull over more red cars when everyone is doing the same things you will eventually use the results to justify your actions. Red cars are more likely to be speeding.

We know cops plant drugs to justify the arrest. From their point of view it makes sense. They know this guy is guilty. If they did not catch him this time, it was just bad luck. Why wait until they can find him and catch him again? It is just easier to plant it and get the guy they know is guilty off the streets.
 

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