Will Congressional Hypocrisy Force Another EO?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by DamnYankee, Jul 5, 2009.

  1. DamnYankee
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    DamnYankee No Neg Policy

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    Hypocrisy on the Hill
    Congress's cowardly move to tie the president's hands on detainee transfers
    Sunday, July 5, 2009

    FOR YEARS, Democrats clamored for the closing of the detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, using the prison to pummel President George W. Bush for abusing his authority, violating domestic and international law, and tarnishing the reputation of the United States. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) felt so strongly about the issue that she sponsored legislation in 2007 to force Mr. Bush to shutter the facility.

    Now lawmakers are making it nearly impossible for President Obama to close the notorious prison by year's end, as he promised to do.

    Ms. Feinstein, Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) and 88 other senators -- including every Republican -- voted to attach to a must-pass, supplemental war spending bill several provisions that tie the president's hands. Ms. Feinstein complained that the president lacked a detailed plan to deal with detainees. Facing fear-mongering opponents who essentially accused Mr. Obama of having his heart set on letting hard-core terrorists roam through American backyards, the Senate withered and collapsed, with Maryland Democrats Barbara Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin and Virginia Democrats James Webb and Mark Warner joining the pack. Only six senators -- all Democrats -- had the courage to vote against this wrong-headed amendment: Richard J. Durbin (Ill.), Tom Harkin (Iowa), Patrick J. Leahy (Vt.), Carl M. Levin (Mich.), and Rhode Island's Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse.

    As a result of the vote, the president is prohibited from using taxpayer funds to order the release of any detainee into the United States, including those cleared by the Bush administration and the federal courts; he is likewise forbidden to bring any Guantanamo prisoners to the United States for preventive detention. The president must give lawmakers a 45-day heads up before ordering any detainee prosecuted in a U.S. court proceeding and he must give Congress 15 days' notice of his decision to send a detainee to another country.

    It is therefore easy to understand why Mr. Obama may be tempted to circumvent lawmakers: The Post reported that he is considering an executive order to establish a preventive detention regime for those who may be too dangerous to release but against whom there is not enough usable evidence to file formal charges in a traditional courtroom. But he should resist the temptation of acting alone. Mr. Bush often did end runs around lawmakers for fear of being constrained; eventually the courts circumscribed his powers more than they likely would have if he had worked with Congress. Mr. Obama's best course lies in opening discussions with Congress on fashioning a preventive detention regime that will ensure due process and humane treatment of detainees. Let's hope that there will be leaders on the Hill available for thoughtful discussion.

    washingtonpost.com
     
  2. WillowTree
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    WillowTree Diamond Member

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    there's a thread around here somewhere that asks "what you have to do not to be attacked by the left" do you see anybody from the left in here attacking these democwats! No.. I bet you don't..:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
  3. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    I am completely disgusted with how the DEMOCRATS are dealing with the GITMO issue.

    I've said so repeatedly, but apparently Willow keeps missing it because if she misses it she can continue whining about how the "left" never complains about the DEMOCRATS.
     
  4. DamnYankee
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    DamnYankee No Neg Policy

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    Here.... Lemme make it bigger for ya....



     
  5. WillowTree
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    WillowTree Diamond Member

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    why doncha let him explain in his own words what disgusts him and which democwats in particular disgust him in gitmo and why????? asshole bit off more than he could chew with this promise to close gitmo didn't he??? now he sits quietly by while "some democrats undermine him" sly like a fox hey?? :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. DamnYankee
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    DamnYankee No Neg Policy

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    Be more than happy to. No good deed goes unpunished.... :)
     
  7. Xenophon
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    Xenophon Gone and forgotten

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    Campaigning and governing are two different things, as the boi king is finding out.
     
  8. DamnYankee
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    DamnYankee No Neg Policy

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    FLASHBACK

    BILL MOYERS:
    Here is a man who came to see you 20 years ago. Wanted to know about
    the neighborhood. Barack Obama was a skeptic when it came to religion.
    He sought you out because he knew you knew about the community. You led
    him to the faith.



    You performed his wedding ceremony. You baptized his two children. You
    were, for 20 years, his spiritual counsel. He has said that. And, yet,
    he, in that speech at Philadelphia, had to say some hard things about
    you. How did those words...how did it go down with you when you heard
    Barack Obama say those things?



    REVEREND WRIGHT:
    It went down very simply. He's a politician, I'm a pastor. We speak to
    two different audiences. And he says what he has to say as a
    politician. I say what I have to say as a pastor. But they're two
    different worlds.



    I do what I do. He does what politicians do. So that what happened in
    Philadelphia where he had to respond to the sound bytes, he responded as
    a politician.

    NPR: Moyers' Interview with Rev. Jeremiah Wright


    It was the kind of Sunday morning tailor-made for a DVR.

    Just two days before the crucial Indiana and North Carolina primaries, Sen. Barack Obama sat for an hourlong interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” dominated by questions about his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, meanwhile, appeared in a wide-ranging town hall forum in Indiana on ABC’s “This Week.”

    On NBC, Obama (D-Ill.) admitted that the controversy surrounding Wright “distracted” his campaign. Instead of talking about the economy, the Iraq war and other pressing issues, “we spent a lot of time talking about Rev. Wright. ... It wasn’t welcome.”

    Moderator Tim Russert asked Obama why he waited until last week to denounce Wright’s controversial comments instead of earlier in the campaign. Obama said he felt that Wright’s earlier comments about U.S. foreign policy, origins of AIDS and other issues “didn’t define him.”

    “They were a bunch of sermons that had been spliced and that’s not who I thought he was,” Obama said. “I did what I thought was right, which was denounce the words, not denounce the man.”

    But when Wright spoke at the National Press Club on Monday, “not only did he amplify some of those comments and defended them vigorously, but he added to them,” Obama said.

    “I think what really changed was he was going to double down on the statements he made before,” the senator said. “He put gasoline on the fire.”

    “He didn’t have much regard for the moment we’re in … we’ve got to bring the country together to solve problems,” Obama continued. “What he said did not bring the country together; it divided the country. I didn’t want my presidential campaign to be associated with that.”

    Obama acknowledged that voters should examine his past relationship with Wright.

    “I think it’s fair for people to look at this episode,” he said. “When you’re running for president, your life’s an open book. I think people have the right to lift the hood and kick the tires.”

    When the conversation shifted away from Wright, Obama criticized Clinton (D-N.Y.) for saying in a recent debate that the U.S. would “totally obliterate” Iran if it attacks Israel.

    “It’s not the language we need right now, and I think it’s language reflective of George Bush,” Obama said. “We have had a foreign policy of bluster and saber rattling and tough talk and in the meantime have made a series of strategic decisions that have actually strengthened Iran.”

    Obama defends response to Wright - Amie Parnes - Politico.com
     

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