Which is the more disingenuous revisionist claim?

Discussion in 'History' started by manifold, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. manifold
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    manifold Diamond Member

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    Some people claim that the Civil War wasn't about slavery at all.

    Other people claim that it wasn't about anything else.

    Of course both positions are disingenuous revisionist horseshit.

    But what I can't decide is which one is worse.

    What say you?
     
  2. manifold
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    manifold Diamond Member

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    Upon further consideration, I'd have to say the latter is worse and here is why:

    People who claim that the Civil War wasn't about slavery at all do so out of a subconscious desire to purge their conscience of any guilt associated with honoring the Confederacy. And while this is still revisionist denial, at least it's not borne of malicious intent.

    On the other hand, those that claim it was ONLY about slavery do so out of a desire to malign an entire culture for really no good reason beyond spite and/or hatred. To me that is worse.
     
  3. Intense
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    Intense Senior Member

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    Here is a great book on history, that does touch on injustices done to the South, which fueled tension leading up to the Civil War, separate from slavery. Again, it touches on it, it is not the main topic of the book.




    Reclaiming the American Revolution: The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions and Their Legacy [Hardcover]
    William Watkins (Author)


    Review
    "With historical knowledge that one can only wish more could possess, Watkins has brought our attention back to Jefferson's and Madison's constitutional commentary in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798-1800 and their illuminating relation to American history."--Clyde N. Wilson, Professor of History, University of South Carolina
    "With Reclaiming the American Revolution, we have a thorough, thoughtful, and important study of a significant subject that has been too long neglected."--Joyce O. Appleby, Professor of History, UCLA; past president of Organization of American Historians and American Historical Association
    "William Watkins' important book, Reclaiming the American Revolution, is intriguing and controversial: it is based on much research, and it is full of interest for the questions it raises about federal-state relations."--Robert L. Middlekauf, Preston Hotchkiss Professor of American History, University of California, Berkeley
    -- Review
    Product Description
    Reclaiming the American Revolution examines the struggles for political ascendancy between Federalists and the Republicans in the early days of the American Republic viewed through the lens of the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions authored by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Jefferson and Madison saw the Alien and Sedition Acts as a threat to states' rights, as well as indicative of a national government that sought unlimited power. The Resolutions sought to return the nation to the tenets of the Constitution, in which rights for all were protected by checking the power of the national government. Watkins examines the two sides of this important controversy in early American history and demonstrates the Resolutions' relevance to current politics.

    [ame=http://www.amazon.com/Reclaiming-American-Revolution-Kentucky-Resolutions/dp/1403963037]Amazon.com: Reclaiming the American Revolution: The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions and Their Legacy (9781403963031): William Watkins: Books[/ame]
     
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  4. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    The Civil War was about States Rights

    The Right to own Slaves
     
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  5. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    I've never heard anyone claim that the civil war wasn't about anything but slavery...so maybe you win your own prize for revisionist fucktard of all time. :thup:

    I'd like to throw into the running the claim that Hitler was a socialist.
     
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  6. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    States rights mostly is why it started. But not about slaves, mostly about taxes, tarrifs, etc.
    The slavery issue was thrown in to garner support in the north for the war.
     
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  7. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    Is this a spin off of the Confederate flag vs NY Mosque thread?
     
  8. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Revisionist bullcrap

    The southern states went as far to try to ensure that new states admitted to the union were slave states to maintain the balance of power.

    They seceeded when Lincoln was elected and they weren't concerned with Lincolns views on taxes and tarrifs
     
  9. Sheldon
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    Sheldon Senior Member

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    I think they cared more about Lincoln being sympathetic to the abolitionists than about his view on tariffs. High taxes, they could withstand. Nationwide abolition, they couldn't. They were a one-crop, slave-based economy.
     
  10. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    It all began before what you are talking about, it did not just flare up over night.
     

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