we all should be outraged at the bush admin right now

Discussion in 'Politics' started by DKSuddeth, Feb 10, 2004.

  1. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04041/271362.stm

    WASHINGTON -- The movement of U.S. factory jobs and white-collar work to other countries is part of a positive transformation that will enrich the U.S. economy over time, even if it causes short-term pain and dislocation, the Bush administration said yesterday.

    The embrace of foreign "outsourcing," an accelerating trend that has contributed to U.S. job losses in recent years and become an issue in the 2004 elections, is contained in the president's annual report to Congress on the health of the U.S. economy.

    "Outsourcing is just a new way of doing international trade," said N. Gregory Mankiw, chairman of Bush's Council of Economic Advisors, which prepared the report. "More things are tradable than were tradable in the past. And that's a good thing."

    The report, which predicts that the nation will reverse a three-year employment slide by creating 2.6 million jobs in 2004, is part of a weeklong effort by the administration to highlight signs that the recovery is picking up speed. Bush's economic stewardship has become a central issue in the presidential campaign, and the White House is eager to demonstrate that his policies are producing results.

    In his message to Congress yesterday, Bush said the economy "is strong and getting stronger," thanks in part to his tax cuts and other economic programs. He said the nation had survived a stock market meltdown, recession, terrorist attacks, corporate scandals and war in Afghanistan and Iraq, and was finally beginning to enjoy "a mounting prosperity that will reach every corner of America."

    The president repeated that message during an afternoon "conversation" on the economy at SRC Automotive, an engine-rebuilding plant in Springfield, Mo., where he lashed out at lawmakers who oppose making his tax cuts permanent.

    "When they say, 'We're going to repeal Bush's tax cuts,' that means they're going to raise your taxes, and that's wrong. And that's bad economics," he said.

    Democrats who want Bush's job were quick to challenge his claims.

    Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kerry, the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, supports a rollback of Bush's tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans and backs the creation of tax incentives for companies that keep jobs in the United States -- although he supported the North American Free Trade Agreement, which many union members say is responsible for the migration of U.S. jobs, particularly in the auto industry, to Mexico.

    Campaigning yesterday in Roanoke, Va., Kerry questioned the credibility of the administration's job-creation forecast. "I've got a feeling this report was prepared by the same people who brought us the intelligence on Iraq," he said. "I don't think we need a new report about jobs in America. I think we need a new president who's going to create jobs in America and put Americans back to work."

    In an evening appearance at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., North Carolina Sen. John Edwards mocked the Bush administration's economic report.

    Edwards, also a Democratic presidential nomination candidate who also supports repealing tax cuts for the richest Americans and offering incentives to corporations that create new jobs in the United States, said it would come as a "news bulletin" to the American people that the economy is improving and the outsourcing of jobs overseas is good for America.

    "These people," he said of the Bush administration, "what planet do they live on? They are so out of touch."

    The president's 411-page report contains a detailed diagnosis of the forces contributing to the U.S. economic slowdown and a wide-ranging defense of the policies Bush has pursued to combat it.

    It asserts that the last recession actually began in late 2000, before the president took office, instead of March 2001, as certified by the official recession-dating panel of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

    The report repeats the administration's contention that the Bush tax cuts must be made permanent to have their full beneficial effect on the economy.

    Social Security also must be restructured to let workers put part of their retirement funds in private accounts, the report argues. Doing so could add nearly $5 trillion to the national debt by 2036, the president's advisers note, but the additional borrowing would be repaid 20 years later, and the program's long-term health would be more secure.
     
  2. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Thanks for your talking points. We will file them appropriately.
     
  3. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    Our founding fathers were afraid of the power that corporations might gain. At that time, corporations were a new creation, and were chartered to exist for a short period of time to achieve a certain goal.
    Quoted:


    Those who won independence from England hated corporations as much as they hated the King. For it was through state-chartered corporations that the British government carried out some of its most pernicious oppression. Governments extending their power by means of corporations, and corporations themselves taking on the powers of government, are not new problems.

    Because they were well aware of the track record of government-chartered corporations, and because they guarded their freedom so jealously, citizens of the newly independent United States of America chartered only a handful of corporations in the several decades after independence.

    On those few occasions when states did charter a corporation, "the powers which the corporation might exercise in carrying out its purposes were sparingly conferred and strictly construed."

    But inevitably, the generation that had fought against injustices perpetrated by corporations like the British East India Company and the Hudson Bay Company was followed by others whose memories of corporate oppression were less vivid. Still, the warnings against corporations continued.

    On the eve of his becoming Chief Justice of Wisconsin's Supreme Court, Edward G. Ryan said ominously in 1873,

    "[There] is looming up a new and dark power... the enterprises of the country are aggregating vast corporate combinations of unexampled capital, boldly marching, not for economical conquests only, but for political power.... The question will arise and arise in your day, though perhaps not fully in mine, which shall rule --wealth or man [sic]; which shall lead --money or intellect; who shall fill public stations --educated and patriotic freemen, or the feudal serfs of corporate capital...."

    The feudal serfs of corporate capital made a lot of headway during the next fifteen years. But in 1888 President Grover Cleveland echoed Justice Ryan's sentiments:

    "Corporations, which should be the carefully restrained creatures of the law and the servants of the people, are fast becoming the people's masters."
     
  4. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    obviously that would be right alongside your head, firmly planted up your ass?
     
  5. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Corporations are very constrained by corporate law, and are honest about operating for profit. Governments are contrained by nothing and purport to conduct themselves for the people, which is often a lie. I choose privatization everytime. Government officials are not immune from the temptations of power, and, in fact, their corruption is much worse, because of their absolute power.

    Privatize. Privatize. Privatize.
     
  6. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    Do you kiss your mother with that mouth?
     
  7. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    I don't disagree with this.

    I don't disagree with this, either.

    I certainly agree with this statement.

    I don't see microsoft or SCO being restrained much at all. I certainly don't see IBM being constrained, nor HP or any of the others. These corporatioins are not constrained because they have the capital to buy influence from the government yet we continually elect lawyers, doctors, and wealthy businessmen to these corruptable offices.

    I'd dearly love to see the data, projections, and estimates that bring out statements that outsourcing is going to strengthen the US economy as it relates to me.
     
  8. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    Boy, after 6 years as a marine you haven't even come close to hearing what I'm capable of saying. Your best advice would be to take what I said with a smile and hope it doesn't get any worse.
     
  9. rtwngAvngr
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    rtwngAvngr Guest

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    They are constrained. they are all finished if we decide not to use their products and services. Businesses must have our voluntary support; governments do what they want, with guns. They're contrained relative to governments. What do you want exactly? Communism?
     
  10. DKSuddeth
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    DKSuddeth Senior Member

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    capitalism would be nice instead of this fascist corporatism we're developing now. It won't be much longer until the people have had enough of the BS we're starting to feel and you'll see the fastest 180 ever. We'll soon be back to chartered corporations instead of constitutional right to survive corporations.
     

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