`Tides’ come in on immigration rallies

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  1. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    By Judi McLeod
    Monday, April 10, 2006

    When today’s massive immigration rally gets underway in Holy Week Washington, look for Fidel Castro.

    While Castro may be there only in spirit, pro-Castro activist Leslie Cagan is part of the nuts and bolts behind the burgeoning rallies.

    Latino DJs have been tagged for the 500,000-strong illegal immigrant turnout in Los Angeles alone–but the DJs got nothing on Teresa–who dropped the Kerry–Heinz.

    Teresa Heinz put the foundation of the system for today’s immigrant dissent in place through the Tides Foundation decades ago.

    During the years 1995-2001, the Howard Heinz Endowment, which Teresa Heinz chaired, gave Tides more than $4.3-million.

    Members of 2006’s White Revolution get their information feed from the Internet. In 1991, using a Canadian connection funded by her Tides Foundation, Teresa Heinz, in effect, linked Fidel Castro’s Cuba to the Worldwide Internet.

    Even before Cuba, it was Heinz money that linked the United Nations to some 40,000 activists, of which Marxist Atheist Leslie Cagan is only uno, via the Information Highway.

    In linking the Island of Cuba to the Internet, the Toronto-based Web/Nerv, Canadian affiliate of the Institute for Global Communications (IGC) and its offshoot the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), used a 64 KBPS undersea cable IP link from Havana to Sprint in the United States.

    Nobody has ever questioned that IGC and APC are one of the Tides Foundation’s largest ongoing projects.

    How many media releases have gone out to immigration protester groups from Manhattan?

    A massive, 24-hour, transnational computer communications network, IGC service 17 United Nations offices, 40,000 activists, some of them of the radical stripe and a legion of non-government organizations in more than 133 countries.

    It was like turning the lights on in a dark room when IGC and APC linked up Cuba and the UN.

    The Tides’-paid octopus of the electronic communications world got its quiet kickoff back in 1987, when the England-based GreenNet began collaborating with ICG, which operates PeaceNet, EcoNet, ConflictNet and LaborNet in the United States.

    According to an APC Internet historical account, the two giant networks began sharing their electronic conference materials and "demonstrated that transnational electronic communications could serve international, as well as domestic committees working for peace, human rights and the environment."

    Hooking up the left wing world to the Internet didn’t happen by default. In the spring of 1990, the Tides Foundation funded APC with the specific goal "to coordinate the operation and developing of an emerging global network."

    Cuba’s 1991 connection to the worldwide web was initiated by APC affiliate Canadian NGO Web Networks, forerunner to Web/Nirv. "We created an information tunnel through the American blockade," explained Mark Surman, former technical director of Web Networks. "Our computers would make a long distance call to the computers of the Cuban Center of Automated Exchange (CENIAI), about three times a day to pick up and deliver mail. This is called a store-and-forward system. Then this traffic was gatewayed to the rest of the Internet."

    For more than 40 years, the Torricelli Law has restricted Cuba from purchasing goods from subsidiaries of U.S. companies.

    The Tides Foundation is a charity.

    Under American regulations currently applying to tax-exempt, not-for-profit organizations, IGC has "had to openly pronounce that its networks are for educational and charitable purposes only".

    Under usage rules in the ICG manual, it states, "the network shall not be used in any substantial way to carry on propaganda, to influence legislation or to intervene in any political campaign,

    "It may be used, however, to discuss in a non-partisan way, legislation, politicians and campaigns. Only up to five percent of the total r resource time of staff may go to working in political causes and towards lobbying efforts."

    Tracking Tides and its contributions to leftist causes, www.FrontPageMagazine.com wrote, "In all, Tides has distributed more than $300-million for the Left. These funds went to rabid antiwar demonstrators, anti-trade demonstrators, domestic Islamist organizations, pro-terrorists legal groups, environmentalists, abortion partisans, extreme homosexual activists and open border activists."

    Now the "Tides" is coming in on the illegal immigration movement.
    http://www.canadafreepress.com/2006/cover041006.htm
     

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