Thomas Jefferson and GOD

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by PLYMCO_PILGRIM, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. PLYMCO_PILGRIM
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    PLYMCO_PILGRIM Gold Member

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    see a thread in here stating 4 of the founding fathers did not believe in god. I will make 4 threads with just a few quotes of each of their own words which will disprove this notion.



    "Religion, as well as reason, confirms the soundness of those principles on which our government has been founded and its rights asserted." --Thomas Jefferson to P. H. Wendover, 1815.

    "I have ever thought religion a concern purely between our God and our consciences, for which we were accountable to Him, and not to the priests." --Thomas Jefferson to Mrs. M. Harrison Smith, 1816

    "Religion is a subject on which I have ever been most scrupulously reserved. I have considered it as a matter between every man and his Maker in which no other, and far less the public, had a right to intermeddle." --Thomas Jefferson to Richard Rush, 1813.

    "Our particular principles of religion are a subject of accountability to God alone. I inquire after no man's, and trouble none with mine." --Thomas Jefferson to Miles King, 1814

    "I consider the government of the United States as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. This results not only from the provision that no law shall be made respecting the establishment or free exercise of religion, but from that also which reserves to the states the powers not delegated to the United States. Certainly, no power to prescribe any religious exercise or to assume authority in religious discipline has been delegated to the General Government. It must then rest with the states, as far as it can be in any human authority." --Thomas Jefferson to Samuel Miller, 1808

    "To suffer the civil magistrate to intrude his powers into the field of opinion and to restrain the profession or propagation of principles on supposition of their ill tendency is a dangerous fallacy which at once destroys all religious liberty, because he being of course judge of that tendency will make his opinions the rule of judgment and approve or condemn the sentiments of others only as they shall square with or differ from his own." --Thomas Jefferson: Statute for Religious Freedom
     
  2. pinqy
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    pinqy Gold Member

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    You are familiar with the Jefferson Bible, where he removed all the miracles? He liked the teachings of Jesus, just didn't believe him to be God. And his strong support for Church/State Seperation?
     
  3. PLYMCO_PILGRIM
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    PLYMCO_PILGRIM Gold Member

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    I am very familiar with jefferson. Thanks for providing another example of his faith in God.

    I do not follow jesus either. I feel there is one god and thats the one you pray to (sorta like the way jewish people feel)

    Here is the context of where you are getting the seperation of church and state from

    If you would like the entire context of his letter where people get the notion of seperatoin of church and state click this link http://www.usconstitution.net/jeffwall.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  4. pinqy
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    pinqy Gold Member

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    I'm not aware of anyone, except Jefferson's political opponents, claim that he was an atheist. The main argument is that he was not a Christian, which is certainly arguable.
    And I am familiar with the Danbury Baptist letter, including the original draft:
    Source: Library of Congress

    The context of the letter of course, is that the government has no business stating what is right or proper in religion or using the power of government to establish any kind of orthodoxy. Which is of course, what many Christians are still trying to do with government supported school prayer, and other religious displays/observations at the expense of minority sects (as the Danbury Baptists were) or non-believers.
     
  5. JBeukema
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    He was cool with mosques, though

    But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. -Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1782

    And he hated those who follow blindly- he was a friend to an atheist before he was a friend to any 'good Christians'

    Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because if there be one he must approve of the homage of reason more than that of blindfolded fear. -Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 10, 1787


    As for church and state


    History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government. This marks the lowest grade of ignorance of which their civil as well as religious leaders will always avail themselves for their own purposes.
    -Thomas Jefferson to Alexander von Humboldt, Dec. 6, 1813.


    Christianity neither is, nor ever was a part of the common law.
    -Thomas Jefferson, letter to Dr. Thomas Cooper, February 10, 1814


    And on morality


    If we did a good act merely from love of God and a belief that it is pleasing to Him, whence arises the morality of the Atheist? ...Their virtue, then, must have had some other foundation than the love of God.
    -Thomas Jefferson, letter to Thomas Law, June 13, 1814

    Of course the 'Jefferson Bible' I read had a quote in from that can be summed up as: my beliefs are my own, don't bother me and stop quoting me
     

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