The Environmental Consequences of Ocean Acidification

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Chris, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    (CNN) -- The chemistry of the world's oceans is changing at a rate not seen for 65 million years, with far-reaching implications for marine biodiversity and food security, according to a new United Nations study released Thursday.

    "Environmental Consequences of Ocean Acidification," published by the U.N. Environmental Program (UNEP)," warns that some sea organisms including coral and shellfish will find it increasingly difficult to survive, as acidification shrinks the minerals needed to form their skeletons.

    Lead author of the report Carol Turley, from the UK's Plymouth Marine Laboratory said in a statement: "We are seeing an overall negative impact from ocean acidification directly on organisms and on some key ecosystems that help provide food for billions. We need to start thinking about the risk to food security."

    Tropical reefs provide shelter and food for around a quarter of all known marine fish species, according to the U.N. report, while over one billion people rely on fish as a key source of protein.

    Increasing acidification is likely to affect the growth and structural integrity of coral reef, the study says, and coupled with ocean warming could limit the habitats of crabs, mussels and other shellfish with knock-on effects up and down the food chain.

    Oceans failing the acid test, U.N. says - CNN.com
     
  2. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    [​IMG]


    Tell me this nut doesnt live in a thatched cottage!!!

    "Habitats for crabs":funnyface: We're all real sure this tops peoples priority list in this economy s0n!!!

    I love making fun of oddballs!!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2010
  3. theHawk
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    theHawk Registered Conservative

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    Whats the matter, shouldn't organisms just adapt, or "evolve" as you Darwinian idiots believe?

    Don't see what the big fuss is about anyway- so what if all the plankton dies off and thus the whole food chain from the bottom up. Once our world is lifeless again some acids will mix and bacteria will magically re-appear and mutate into complex organisms again.
     
  4. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    uncertainty wins assholes!!!:fu::boobies::lmao::funnyface::boobies::fu::boobies::fu::tomato:
     
  5. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Oh no, folks it's worse than that. Acidification is pure unadulterated horse crap (something Chris is intimately experienced with I fear). Or to paraphrase Samuel Johnson, "ocean acidification is the last refuge of the global warming scoundrel."

    As can be seen, the absolute worst that man could get the ocean pH level to is 8.0 (on average) it currently sits at 8.1. whereas to obtain a "acidic" level you must geta pH below 7.

    In other words the whole acidification issue is a pure lie, and they know it.

    Quadrant Online - Why scientists get it wrong
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Information from people with real scientific credentials. Not some wingnut.

    :: SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY, UC SAN DIEGO : RESEARCH : OCEAN ACIDIFICATION :::

    New Science for an Emerging Threat:
    Ocean Acidification Research at Scripps Oceanography
    It is well established among researchers that the uptake of increased amounts of carbon dioxide will make ocean water more acidic as the gas dissolves to create carbonic acid. Ocean chemistry is changing 100 times more rapidly than in the 650,000 years that preceded the modern industrial era and since the late 1980s, researchers at Scripps Oceanography and others have recorded an overall drop in the pH of the oceans from 8.16 to 8.05.

    This increased acidity can hamper the ability of a wide variety of marine organisms ranging from coral to abalone to form calcium carbonate shells and skeletonal structures. Researchers believe that at crucial stages in the larval and juvenile stages in the lives of many marine invertebrates, ocean acidification inhibits calcification, and also appears to affect reproduction and growth in some organisms.

    Scripps Oceanography is emerging as an international center of ocean acidification research. Late Scripps geochemist Charles David Keeling is best known for his famous record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations known as the Keeling Curve, but he also started the first time series of ocean carbon dioxide content in 1983 near Bermuda. Scripps marine chemist Andrew Dickson established the reference standards that are used worldwide to ensure the uniform quality of carbon and alkalinity measurements in sewater. Such uniform, high-quality data has been key to helping scientists around the world recognize and understand the nature of ocean acidification.
     
  7. Revere
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    Revere BANNED

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    Just import that new extraterrestrial life form that eats arsenic.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    A whole course on the subject, again, from real scientists.

    Overview : OCB Ocean Acidification Short Course

    OCB OCEAN ACIDIFICATION SHORT COURSE – NOVEMBER 2-13, 2009
    The Ocean Carbon & Biogeochemistry (OCB) Project Office (funded by NSF, NASA, and NOAA) with co-sponsorship from the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA) coordinated and hosted a hands-on ocean acidification short course from November 2-13, 2009 at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA. With representation from 14 countries, the course convened 20 instructors and 35 participants (postdoctoral and faculty level) from multiple sub-disciplines of biological and chemical oceanography. Building upon recommendations from the recent Ocean Acidification Best Practices Workshop in Kiel, Germany, instructors educated participants on appropriate chemical and biological techniques and protocols related to ocean acidification research using a combination of lectures and hands-on laboratory experiences. The first segment of the course focused on water sampling and measurement techniques for inorganic carbon parameters in seawater. Instructors also provided demonstrations of software packages used to calculate CO2 system parameters (CO2SYS, seacarb). The second segment focused on key aspects of ocean acidification experimental design, such as manipulation of seawater chemistry, biological perturbation approaches, and lab- and field-based methods for measuring organism calcification and other physiological responses to seawater chemistry changes. The third segment included lectures and hands-on work with biogeochemical modeling and use of large global data sets in ocean acidification research. In the final segment, participants learned about ocean acidification data reporting requirements and metadata guidelines and gained hands-on experience with the Ocean Data View (ODV) software.

    The Course Materials page includes a full course syllabus, background materials, lecture files, and video footage of all course lectures. For more information on who participated in the course, please visit the Participants page. Please check back often, as we will be populating this page with photos and brief bios of the participants and instructors.
     
  9. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    That bug in Mono Lake doesn't eat arsenic, dimbulb. It uses arsenic in the place of phosphorus.
     
  10. Revere
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    From climate change, among other things, comes evolution.

    Don't tell me you don't believe in evolution?
     

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