The 2-1 principle of sci-fi

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Hobbit, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Anyone else ever notice this? The 2-1 principle is when characters in a sci-fi movie or series are giving examples of historical people/events/etc. They almost always give two that are actually historical figures that we recognize, in order to establish a pattern, plus one that they just made up on the spot, so it sounds like something has happened between now and then. Lemme give you some examples.

    "But I really want to save the people of that planet."
    "But what if one of those people is the next Hitler, or Stalin, or Drak'thull?"

    "Who knows how many people are actually members of the Nazi party, or the Communists, or the Jihad party"

    "Great powers have risen and fallen in shorter times spans: Turkey in the 1910s, Germany in the 1940s, Russia in 2030s."

    "He could be the next Mozart, or Beethoven, or even Krayzool."

    Get the drift? Anyone else ever notice this?
     
  2. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    Yes, Star Trek does that all the time. Even the begining sequence of Enterprise does that.

    They show a montage of great exploration feats: sail ships on the high seas, men walking on the moon, the launch of a shuttle, the construction of the ISS, and then a shot of the first warp speed ship.
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I imagine if we didn't have some historical reference to relate it to that it would all seem just like gobbly gook. It gives it that surrealistic effect that entices those that are so inclined.
     

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