Supreme Court to weigh Virginia life sentences in Washington sniper case

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by Disir, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. Disir
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    Disir Gold Member

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    WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Wednesday over whether to uphold Virginia’s life sentences without parole imposed on Washington sniper Lee Boyd Malvo for murders and other crimes committed when he was 17.

    Malvo and his partner, John Allen Muhammad, terrorized Washington, Maryland and Virginia in a series of shootings that killled 10 and wounded three others beginning Oct. 2, 2002. The infamous “D.C. snipers” were apprehended 22 days later at a rest stop near Myersville, Maryland.

    The Supreme Court will decide whether Malvo’s life sentences without parole in Virginia – imposed for crimes he committed as a minor – violate Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment.
    Supreme Court to weigh Virginia life sentences in Washington sniper case

    This doesn't look good.
     
  2. Tijn Von Ingersleben
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    Tijn Von Ingersleben Gold Member

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  3. Blackrook
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    Blackrook Gold Member

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    He is too dangerous to ever let out of prison, and my guess is, the Supreme Court will see it that way too.
     
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  4. Vastator
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    Vastator Gold Member

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    There should be no such thing as “life sentences”. They are a breech of the prohibition against cruel, and unusual punishment. Not to mention an extraordinary waste of tax dollars to invest in lifetime care, for a person who will never enter back into society, and help contribute to the tax base. It’s a net financial loss. Prison sentences should max out at 20 years. If society cannot figure out how to exact its “justice” in 20 years; go for the death penalty. But quit wasting our money on investments with no return...
     
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  5. Disir
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    Disir Gold Member

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    I agree. The way the court has ruled indicates he has to be eligible for parole. That is for the good, the bad and the ugly.

    Unless he meets the criteria here: the defendant is found to be "irreparably corrupt" and "permanently incorrigible." Pretty vague stuff.

    Either way its not going to be pretty.
     
  6. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Award Winning USMB Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    We have a conservative Supreme Court.......no chance in hell
     
  7. Blues Man
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    Blues Man Gold Member

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    So are you gin to hire mass murderers who get let out of prison?

    I know I won't
     
  8. Vastator
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    Vastator Gold Member

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    And in adherence to the founding principle of freedom of association; you should not be compelled to. Though that is an entirely different topic...
     
  9. Blues Man
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    Blues Man Gold Member

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    So you assume that employers all over the country would hire mass murderers if there were no more life without parole sentences?
     
  10. Vastator
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    You seem to be overlooking the aforementioned death penalty option. That aside... I make no assumptions to what every prospective employer would do in regards to hiring. That is their business. My speculation on the matter isn’t required.
     

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