So the Oceans are rising are they?

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Another article in the same journal.

    Journal of Coastal Research online journal - Effects of Global Change on Heterogeneous Coastal Aquifers: A Case Study in Belgium

    Effects of Global Change on Heterogeneous Coastal Aquifers: A Case Study in Belgium

    A. Vandenbohede, K. Luyten, and L. Lebbe
    Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 (S8), B-9000 Gent, Belgium, alexander.vandenbohede@ugent.be

    Abstract

    Coastal plains are in the frontline of climate change. Predicted increase in recharge and sea level rise will alter groundwater flow, water quality distribution, recharge, and discharge considerably. This is simulated here in the Belgian western coastal plain. It consists of a shore, dunes, and polder (low-lying area) with a heterogeneous ground-water reservoir of quaternary age. A three-dimensional density-dependent groundwater flow model based on numerous (hydro)geologic observations was made. First the current groundwater flow and distribution between fresh and salt water was simulated. Then the effects of a 15% recharge increase and 0.4 m of sea level rise in the next 100 years were modelled. Sea level rise results in an increased flow of fresh water toward the polder and a decreased flow toward the sea. An increase in recharge results in more water flowing toward both the polder and the sea. Brackish water present in the polder will be pushed back as is a current saltwater intrusion from the polder in the dunes. The simulations also show that groundwater levels will rise. This will put strain on the ecologically valuable dunes and the drainage system in the polders.
     
  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Again, from the same journal.

    http://www.jstor.org/pss/4298366

    Abstract
    Sea level oscillated between 5500 and 3500 years ago at Murrells Inlet, South Carolina (33°33'N, 79°02'W). The oscillation is well constrained by marsh foraminiferal zonations. For the same time interval, data from Nova Scotia indicate an acceleration in sea-level rise and a report from the Gulf of St. Lawrence suggests an oscillation of sea level at the same time. The implications are: (1) there was a eustatic sealevel oscillation of about 2 m in the mid-Holocene on the east coast of North America that is not detectable in present geophysical models of relative sea-level change; (2) if an anthropogenically derived global warming of 4°C takes place, sea level may rise as much as 2 m in 500 yr along the east coast of North America. It appears that the initial rapid rise is recorded all along the eastern seaboard of North America, but detection of the subsequent fall is dependent on existing glacio-isostatic effects (either subsidence or rebound) that are independent of eustatic sea level.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Journal of Coastal Research online journal - Climate Controls on US West Coast Erosion Processes

    Climate Controls on US West Coast Erosion Processes

    Jonathan C. Allana and Paul D. Komarb
    aCoastal Field Office, Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, PO Box 1033, Newport, OR 97365, U.S.A. jonathan.allan@dogami.state.or.us

    bCollege of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean Administration Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, U.S.A

    Abstract

    Erosion along the West Coast of the United States is affected by climate controls that include a trend of increasing wave heights during at least the past 25 years that might be related to global warming and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) range between El Niños and La Niñas that affects both annual wave conditions and monthly mean water levels that raise tidal elevations. These processes are analyzed for sites from Washington to south-central California, revealing a latitude dependence of the individual processes and how their combinations affect total water levels at the shore, which is important to beach and property erosion. Particularly significant on the coast of the Pacific Northwest (Washington and Oregon) has been the progressive decadal increases in deep-water wave heights and periods, which have increased breaker heights and elevated storm wave runup levels on beaches. Along the entire West Coast, the annual variations in wave conditions above and below any progressive decadal increase are controlled by the North Pacific index (NPI), the atmospheric pressure difference between the Hawaiian High and Aleutian Low, and the ENSO range, as demonstrated by a strong correlation with the multivariate ENSO index (MEI), with the highest wave conditions occurring during El Niños. In addition, the ENSO range is particularly important in controlling mean water levels, causing tides to reach their highest elevations during El Niños, again shown by correlations with MEIs along the entire West Coast. With El Niños producing increased deep-water wave heights, runup levels on beaches, and elevated tides, the total water levels at the shore from the combined processes are significantly higher compared with normal or La Niña years, resulting in episodes of major property erosion along the entire US West Coast.

    ADDITIONAL INDEX WORDS: El Niño, La Niña, global climate, wave climate
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Satellite observations.

    CEOS

    Since the beginning of high-accuracy satellite altimetry in the early 1990s, global mean sea level has been shown by both tide gauges and altimeters to be rising at a rate of just above 3 mm/year, compared to a rate of less than 2 mm/year from tide gauges over the previous century. The exact source of the accelerated rise is uncertain, but, with regard to future uncertainty, attention is being given to understanding the rate of loss of ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. About half of the sea level rise during the first decade of the altimeter record can be attributed to thermal expansion due to a warming of the oceans; the other major contributions include the combined effects of melting glaciers and ice sheets.
     
  5. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    Like temperature you can argue back and forth about sea levels, too. The bottom line is, if GHGs keep going up, how can we expect anything but warming? You can argue all you want about absolute figures, but if GHGs keep going up, you've never posted anything that proves that temps and sea levels won't eventually go up, too. I'm not tied to any timeline myself, just the LOGIC of, if there's an increase in an energy-trapping substance, lo and behold!, more energy will be trapped. Since humans put out more CO2 in days than all the volcanoes on earth do in a normal year, to what would you ascribe the cause for the increase in atmospheric GHGs, since the advent of the Industrial Revolution?
     
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  6. Old Rocks
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    Seems that I have addressed the OP. Seems to be a differance of opinion here. The majority are stating that the sea level rise is accelerating. And all are from peer reviewed journals, also. Of course, most of the ones I have cited are data from all over the world, rather than just the US.

    Observations of present-day sea level change: What do they tell us? (Invited)

    Title:
    Observations of present-day sea level change: What do they tell us? (Invited)
    Authors:
    Nerem, R.
    Affiliation:
    AA(CCAR, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA; nerem@colorado.edu)
    Publication:
    American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2010, abstract #NH11D-03 Publication Date:
    12/2010
    Origin:
    AGU
    Keywords:
    [1641] GLOBAL CHANGE / Sea level change, [4556] OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL / Sea level: variations and mean
    Bibliographic Code:
    2010AGUFMNH11D..03N

    Abstract
    With the launch of TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) in 1992 and the subsequent launch of Jason-1 (2001) and Jason-2 (2008), we now have a precise 18-year continuous record of sea level change. Observations of sea level change from tide gauges also play an important role, because they provide a means of linking the satellite observations over the last decade to sea level change over the past century. Two more developments fundamentally improved our capability to study the causes of sea level change: the launch of the GRACE satellite gravity mission and the establishment of the Argo network of profiling floats. Together, satellite altimetry, satellite gravity, tide gauge data, and Argo measurements have provided unprecedented insight into the magnitude, spatial variability, and causes of present-day sea level change. These results will be reviewed and compared to historical measurements of sea level change from the tide gauge network. The main conclusion is that the rate of sea level rise has roughly doubled over the last few decades. All of these observations give us clues about future sea level change, but important questions remain concerning the magnitude, spatial variability, and socio-economic impacts of this change. This talk will assess what tools and other developments we need to answer these questions
     
  7. westwall
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    westwall Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Seems the sea level isn't really rising in Tuvalu either, nor the rest of the Pacific Islands that are being measured....yet another alarmist claim go's POOF.

    Quick oltrakrfraud, post three more!

    ICECAP
     

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    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  8. RDD_1210
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    RDD_1210 Forms his own opinions

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    It's almost as if being ignorant is somehow the "in thing" these days.
     
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  9. IanC
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    its odd how the areas with the best data always seem to show the least amount of 'climate change' and the areas with poor data and the most infilling and 'adjustments' show the most. I cant help but think the next 10 or 20 years will show an interesting reversal of trends as the cumulative affects of 'pushing' data in a certain direction will pop the bubble and lead to a correction. we may get a preview of that when the Berkeley data comes out hugely expands the error bars for a large percentage of the planet.
     
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  10. Old Rocks
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    Well, Walleyes, you managed to post one that was peer reviewed.

    ICECAP is just another denier site, with really lousy credentials. Why don't you post more from peer reviewed sites like the first one. At least that was credible. ICECAP is junk.
     

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