Right or Wrong? your thoughts?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Stephanie, Nov 16, 2005.

  1. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    US might seek substitute for UN
    By Betsy Pisik
    The Washington Times
    Published November 15, 2005


    NEW YORK -- America's representative at the United Nations said yesterday that the organization must become better at solving problems and more responsive to U.S. concerns or Washington will seek other venues for international action.

    During a luncheon with reporters and editors at The Washington Times, U.N. Ambassador John R. Bolton said repeatedly that the Bush administration requires nothing less than "a revolution of reform" at the world body, encompassing everything from U.N. Security Council engagement to management changes to a focus on administrative skills in choosing the next secretary-general.


    The United Nations, he said, "has got to be a place to solve problems that need solving, rather than a place where problems go, never to emerge."

    He added: "In the United States, there is a broadly shared view that the U.N. is one of many potential instruments to advance U.S. issues, and we have to decide whether a particular issue is best done through the U.N. or best done through some other mechanism. ...

    "The U.N. is one of many competitors in a marketplace of global problem solving," Mr. Bolton said. That realization "should be an incentive for the organization to reform."

    One alternative, he said, is for regional organizations to play a larger role. He praised the Organization of American States for its work in Haiti and said he would like the African Union to take on greater responsibilities in Africa.

    Mr. Bolton, who has been directly or indirectly involved in U.N. affairs since the Reagan administration, said he has found little surprising in his 3½ months in Turtle Bay.

    "It's exactly what I expected," he said. "It does move in many ways that lead you to think it's caught in a time warp, with discussions they could have had in the '60s, '70s, '80s."

    Referring to obsolete mandates and bodies, he said: "Even though the Cold War is over and many of these issues are over, frankly, the mind-set in the U.N. complex hasn't changed much. I don't think that it's a philosophical point of view. ... There is a culture of inaction."

    The ambassador said he would like to see change within the "P5," the powerful conclave of five permanent U.N. Security Council nations. Russia, China, France, Britain and the United States must work more closely to craft powerful resolutions and make sure they are enforced, he said.

    Mr. Bolton also wants to see the 15-member council address the underlying causes that have spawned 17 active peacekeeping missions, including a half-dozen that are decades old.

    "The biggest change that we should try and make is to have the Security Council play a larger role in solving these problems, rather than turning them over to the Secretariat and special envoys," he said.

    Where Washington and its P5 counterparts find their national interests in opposition, he said, Washington "may need to find another organization to accomplish our objectives."

    The ambassador, who previously handled the disarmament portfolio at the State Department, accused Iran of concealing significant nuclear-weapons programs and said that the International Atomic Energy Agency will remain a key player in its disarmament, with or without a referral to the Security Council.

    The Bush administration has been a principal advocate of management reform at the United Nations -- supported by a mandate from U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the passion of new management and budget czar Christopher Burnham, and crisply worded criticism from oil-for-food investigator Paul Volcker.

    But developing nations have mounted stiff resistance to many of the administrative changes sought by Washington -- most of which call for reducing micromanagement by budget committees within the General Assembly.

    The Bush administration and many lawmakers also are seeking to create a more credible and responsible Human Rights Council, which also is arousing suspicion in many quarters.

    "I have to say these efforts have slowed down, and I'm concerned we may not make it by the end of the year," Mr. Bolton said. "There is substantial opposition."

    He said the administration has increased its lobbying efforts at the United Nations and in foreign capitals.

    Washington's frustration with the General Assembly is well-known.

    Mr. Bolton said yesterday that the United States pays 22 percent of the regular U.N. budget, yet has only one vote out of 191 cast.

    "We have one-half of 1 percent of the total [votes], meaning we pay 44 times more than our voting power," he said.

    "My priority is to give the United States the kind of influence it should have. Everybody pursues their national interests. The only one who gets blamed for it is the United States."
     
  2. CSM
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    CSM Senior Member

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    I really, really, REALLY like Bolton!
     
  3. insein
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    insein Senior Member

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    Wow. Bolton is the man. How long before the snooty response of "You stupid American. How dare you tell us what to do. Just write your check to our coffers, sit down and shut up."
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Bolton is so correct! Too many problems go there to be yakked about, nothing ever just gets done. Hand in hand with that is the corruption.
     
  5. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    It’s time we shake the change purse. Watch em whine like the welfare recipients they are.
     
  6. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    Hehe, I'm so glad Bush decided to "sneak in the nomination behind the back of the senate." Take that Ted Kennedy.
     
  7. Zhukov
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    Zhukov VIP Member

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    When half the constituents are dictator states one should expect that the whole organization would eventually turn into something similar to a corrupt banana republic, just on a global scale.

    It goes beyond us paying dues 44 times the size of our voting power. The fundamental flaw of the U.N. is that unelected totalitarian governments are treated as the equals of free democratic states.

    It's time to stop thinking about organizing a replacement body and finally establish one. Let whoever wants to keep pretending the U.N. is a noble and useful institution. Because no matter how hard we try we will never be able to expunge half the member states from the U.N., and absent that it isn't worth spending another second listening to its proclamations or another dime to fund it's activities.
     
  8. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    I agree. I propose that the US get together with some other like-minded states and establish something along the lines of a World Democracy and Republic Club. To join, you have to:

    1. Have a democratic or republican form of government.
    2. Not outlaw all but one political party (e.g. no Commie bastards).
    3. Respect basic human rights (life, liberty, property).

    That's it. There's probably about 50 countries that would/could belong. They could all pull out of the UN and we could have a really fun time telling the UN to piss off.
     
  9. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Why on earth do we need to create a competing international organization when we have had the best one around for over 200+ years: The United States. Our Constitution has for centuries been an effective balance preserving the rights and responsibilities between individuals, states, and a federal government. The last thing we need is another beauracracy above the federal government. Besides the fact that it would be unconstitutional to begin with, it just slows up any way to get things done effectively and will restrict more individual rights.

    The Constitution already allows methods for adopting states into a repuiblian government. Why do we need to mess with something that has already been proven effective?
     

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