Raised bed vs in ground gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening and Landscaping' started by JustAnotherNut, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. JustAnotherNut
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    JustAnotherNut Platinum Member

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    How did you have it up? Like fencing???

    I was thinking of using pvc pipe, poultry wire and connectors to make like a hoop house of sorts. With the bent pipe spaced about a foot or so apart it should provide a decent support to the wire
    this is with hardware cloth and concrete bricks, but still gives you the idea
    [​IMG]




    or this one shows with lattice, just have to cover the ends
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Dekster
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    Dekster Gold Member

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    I have both raised beds and just your typical in-ground beds. The raised beds dry out faster but are easier to weed. Just depends on your situation and how much you are growing. I couldn't afford to do everything in raised beds because all the materials would take 25 years to break even growing the same amount as I do in-ground. I use the raised beds for garlic, lettuces, onions and the like mostly--things that weeding is an extra PITA to deal with.
     
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  3. DamnDude
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    DamnDude Active Member

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    A few years ago I started doing raised beds, due to back issues. I made 4'x 8' by 18" high boxes to test things out and filled them with combinations of compost and topsoil. my 1st season went so well. Tomatoes of all varieties in 5 boxes and I couldn't keep up with them. In one box I planted black cherry and yellow pear tomatoes. I never had to plant either one for the next 4 years, and they cross pollinated to a very tasty hybrid as well.
    The best thing about boxes, to me, is you can get very specific with each box to adjust ph balance for specific plants. More acidity for tomatoes, more balanced for cukes, etc.
    Having grown up with in ground gardening, I didn't hold out much hope for raised beds, however, it's now the way I do it.
    Another thing I fell into is cold boxes for herbs... absolutely fantastic for starting plants early in my region (Central Texas) and extending the growing season to year round in many/most cases for said herbs.
    For the frames and sides of the raised beds and cold boxes, I went to a local sawmill and got the dregs of rough cut ceder, (good for bug control btw) oak and even mesquite.... although the oak and mesquite are some what more expensive they are more durable than the ceder, but, I had fewer bug issues in the ceder beds.
     
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  4. whoisit
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    whoisit VIP Member

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    One weekend of hard work and problem solved yet last most of us a lifetime.
    I put up a 4' welded wire fence around raised bed area,then went up the fence about 2' above and 2' below laid on the ground so they can't dig under. According to how big your garden area is will determine the work and expense.

    We have 4 raised beds but it is just for us old people to take care of. I just turned 2 of ours this past week. Turned the others 2 in Jan when we planted potatoes.
    We also have a greenhouse and do some hydroponics. Not as much as before so we use containers inside greenhouse to start early.
     
  5. whoisit
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    whoisit VIP Member

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    Just be careful the cedar doesn't run off the pollinators. But very good idea about the raised raised beds.
     
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  6. DamnDude
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    DamnDude Active Member

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    Never had any issues with pollinators... Most of the plants I plant, tomatoes, cukes, melons are self pollinating anyways... However, I did have the yellow pear/black cherry tomatoes cross and make a quite tasty hybrid, while in the cedar boxes, and earthworms were copious as well, the one thing I noticed was there were fewer grub worms... Which was nice.
     
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