Proof of discrimination in health care

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Wolfstrike, Jul 27, 2012.

  1. Wolfstrike
    Offline

    Wolfstrike Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,358
    Thanks Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Ratings:
    +1,175
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/8Gh_bEiD_Fk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>



    Proof of discrimination in health care - YouTube


    thanks to the health care bill, every working person must now participate while these guys go about their merry way chosing who they want to provide care for
     
  2. CaféAuLait
    Offline

    CaféAuLait This Space for Rent

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    Messages:
    7,776
    Thanks Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Ratings:
    +2,323
    Dr Jack Moshine: "You brought me down for this bum!?!?!"

    Wow, so what did he expect to only be called when non-bums arrived? WTF?
     
  3. Wolfstrike
    Offline

    Wolfstrike Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,358
    Thanks Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Ratings:
    +1,175
    yep.
    and when people pay $1000 per month for their health care insurance
     
  4. emilynghiem
    Offline

    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    15,636
    Thanks Received:
    1,877
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    National Freedmen's Town District
    Ratings:
    +4,298
    Dear W:
    Just the fact the federal mandates would "regulate" which religious affiliations qualify as exemption from the penalty for not buying insurance

    is unconstitutional because it discriminates by religion
    and would decide penalties against people based on their beliefs or lack of affiliation with a qualifying exempted group!!!

    the best way i see to fix this is to make it voluntary to OPT IN
    not require proof in order to OPT OUT

    you can still set up the exchanges or health insurance coops etc
    but it cannot be mandated by govt and have religious conditions favoring
    some people or groups over others

    the same problem has been happening with conscientious objectors to war
    and not always being able to prove religious beliefs so these people get
    harassed and penalized if they can't prove they meet legal requirements
     
  5. Jackson
    Offline

    Jackson Gold Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Messages:
    19,645
    Thanks Received:
    4,875
    Trophy Points:
    290
    Location:
    Nashville
    Ratings:
    +12,684
    What happened to the Hippocratic Oath?

    What Happened to the Hippocratic Oath?

    I am 57 years old and have been practicing for close to 30 years. When I was a child, growing up, we were taught to believe that Health Practitioners chose their professions as a calling, to help and heal people and to see that people could live a long and fulfilling life. I&#8217;d like to believe that this is still the case and perhaps I&#8217;ve become a bit more cynical as I&#8217;ve aged and watched how the health care field has evolved over the years.

    I attended an excellent college, in fact one of the top universities in the United States. A great many of the incoming students were pre-med, meaning that they were talking the courses necessary so they would be admitted into a medical school. My first exposure to the realities of health care was from speaking to some of these freshmen and more often than not, the conversations seemed to revolve around the huge amounts of money they would make when they became Doctors. On occasion, I did speak to those people who really wanted to make a difference and really help the suffering, however more often than not, becoming a doctor was more about the potential money and prestige that came with the profession at that time (early 1970&#8217;s).

    As it turned out, the pre-med syllabus was difficult (to say the least) and many of these students lasted one semester. However, those who were able to memorize the required work and regurgitate it were able to get the high grades and did go on to become doctors, dentists and other health care workers. I noticed that many of these students had no &#8220;people skills&#8221; but were good at spitting back the required information.

    Now, I&#8217;ll fast forward 30 years. The medical field has dramatically changed and the large incomes are gone. Most doctors I know are working long hours, paying high office expenses and being &#8220;managed&#8221; by managed care, meaning that they cannot always make the proper decisions that are in the patient&#8217;s best interest. Managed care companies tell the doctors what they can and cannot do. Of course, they don&#8217;t blatantly say it and would deny it if accused, but when necessary treatments are not covered for one reason or another, this is the way that the control works. Additionally, as most doctors have contracts with managed care companies, these doctors are contracted to accept whatever payment is negotiated, and most times the payments are much lower than what the public believes. A doctor might submit a bill for $150.00 but will be lucky to receive $46 dollars and by contract will have to write off the rest.

    This brings me to the subject at hand. As I very successfully treat Fibromyalgia, I am in constant contact with Rheumatologists, Chronic pain Doctors, Psychologists and other professionals who deal with fibro and related issues and illnesses.

    Story 1 &#8211; Three years ago, I had a patient who had suffered with fibromyalgia for 20 years. She had gone from doctor to doctor with very little results. At that point she was under the care of a Rheumatologist. This particular patient found me and decided to begin treatment at my office. Her Rheumatologist was very supportive (something I find to be rare) and told her that if the treatment worked, he would be able to refer loads of his fibro patients because he really did not know what to do with them. Suffice it to sat, Terry has been fibro free for three years (my treatment lasts 8 weeks) and sent back a wonderful report to her Rheumatologist. I, than, decided to set up a lunch appointment with this doc to see if he might be a viable source of referrals, after all, he said that he was looking for someone who knew how to treat these patients. This doctor and I had a nice lunch, but as he explained it, over 50% of his practice were patients with Fibromyalgia and if they all got well, he would lose his practice. I was stunned.

    Story 2 &#8211; I met with a Clinical Psychologist, who had Fibromyalgia for about 13 years and began treatment in my office. She was successfully treated and all her fibro symptoms had resolved. As she told me &#8220;Thank you for giving me my life back&#8221;. Being that she had suffered for so long with fibro, she had begun to specialize in running support groups for chronically ill patients, the majority having Fibromyalgia. She than asked me a question which also stunned me: &#8220;How am I going to hide the fact that I no longer have fibro symptoms from the people in my group?&#8221; When I asked what she meant, she explained that her chronic pain groups provided a high percent of her income and she could not afford to lose that money. I replied: &#8220;Isn&#8217;t it more important to be able to help people?&#8221; Her response: &#8220;I have expenses and 2 children in private schools.&#8221;

    I have other similar stories which have accumulated over the years, but needless to say times have changed. More and more professionals are concerned, not with helping but with their own interests. Now this is not to say that all professionals are like this, but I seem to meet more and more. This is especially more evident when the economy takes its habitual dips.

    I wonder if this is a new trend or if this has always been the situation and I just didn&#8217;t see it. My gut tells me that money always played a factor but the situation has worsened over the years.

    There have also always been turf wars among health professionals and this also plays a part. Psychiatrists think psychologists are not highly trained; orthopedists think podiatrists are not trained etc.

    My advice is that if you have a good, wonderful and caring doctor, keep him or her at all costs, even if it means paying for the care out of your pocket if the insurance plan changes. Your health is your most important asset, take care of it.

    Dr. Gene Martin
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2012
  6. emilynghiem
    Offline

    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    15,636
    Thanks Received:
    1,877
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    National Freedmen's Town District
    Ratings:
    +4,298
    I've heard this blamed on insurance companies for deciding based on profits
    what to pay for or not pay for.

    I believe in spiritual healing to reduce the costs of both prevention, correction and procedures concerning medical and mental health treatments.

    If this were studied and documented, where everyone had equal access to free spiritual healing and therapy, then the resources and facilities already in place could be focused more on the cases that truly require extensive procedures.

    Also, by applying spiritual healing to get rid of the root cause of criminal illness and addiction, the billions currently wasted on prosecution, incarceration, hospitalization and other damages and expenses to people and property because of crime violence and abuse

    could be redirected toward paying for health care, housing, and education without additional taxpayers money than what is already being spent on govt waste

     
  7. Wolfstrike
    Offline

    Wolfstrike Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,358
    Thanks Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Ratings:
    +1,175


    don't worry about it.
    i bet they'll get rid of it in a few years
     
  8. Greenbeard
    Offline

    Greenbeard Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Messages:
    6,809
    Thanks Received:
    1,200
    Trophy Points:
    200
    Location:
    New England
    Ratings:
    +1,323
    Counterpoint:

    The Great Unmentionable: The role of high salaries and wages in health care inflation
     
  9. atlasshrugged
    Offline

    atlasshrugged Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    149
    Thanks Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +21
    This report disregards one critical fact. Although Med School is 4 years, a 3-4 year residency is required before Board Certification and the right to practice. Residency programs do not have steep tuition rates, but the cost of living for 4 years adds up quickly. And that is only for the general physician. Those specialists who make $350,000 a year have to complete an additional 2-3 years of specialization (these include ER Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Urologist, Nephrologists, Ortho Surgeons, etc)

    Lawyers making 110,00 a year for 3 years of school vs a Doctor making $200,000 for 7 years or $350,000 for 10 years doesn't sound so crazy.
     
  10. onecut39
    Offline

    onecut39 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,523
    Thanks Received:
    140
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +150

    This video is 46 seconds long and says absolutely nothing. You have a point? Show us a complete video.

    As it is I don't have a clue as to what you are talking about.
     

Share This Page