People not looking for work?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by LilOlLady, May 5, 2012.

  1. LilOlLady
    Offline

    LilOlLady Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    7,841
    Thanks Received:
    660
    Trophy Points:
    140
    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Ratings:
    +762
    PEOPLE NOT LOOKING FOR WORK?
    Then what the hell or they doing? Welfare don’t pay the rent, buy clothes, pay doctor bills, bill gas and food stamps run out before the end of the month and they are not looking for work? People who are use to working do not stop looking for work and settle for being in a state or mere existence. This is just RRWE rhetoric to further their attacks on Obama. How do you measure people not looking of work?
    Unemployment is at 8.1% and RRWE are running scared and will ask anything to make obama look bad before the election. Jobs are being created, businesses are hiring but people are not looking for jobs? Anyone not looking for job do not want a job.
    Do we count Illegal Aliens working, not working and not looking for work when the unemployed rate is taken? Millions of Illegal Aliens in the work force taking jobs form Americans can also account for the unemployment rate of Americans.
    When Bush left office the unemployment rate was 7.5% was the because people was no longer looking for work?
     
  2. pinqy
    Offline

    pinqy Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Messages:
    5,054
    Thanks Received:
    574
    Trophy Points:
    165
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Ratings:
    +1,009
    You ask them if they're looking for work. The UE rate comes from a household survey and people are asked if they're working, looking for work, not looking for work, if they want a job, if they could take a job etc.

    Out of an Adult (16+) Civilian Non-Institutional population of 242,784,000, there are about 141,995,000 working, and 100,789,000 not working. 11,910,000 are available and looking for work (Unemployed) and 88,879,000 unavailable or not looking. Those are mostly 65 and older, married women, 16-19 year olds, and the disabled. Around 6 million say they want to work, but either couldn't take a job if offered or haven't looked in over a month.


    Yes. The survey doesn't ask about immigration status.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  3. SniperFire
    Offline

    SniperFire Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Messages:
    13,627
    Thanks Received:
    1,219
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Inside Your Head
    Ratings:
    +1,223
    Why work when you can vote?
     
  4. KissMy
    Offline

    KissMy Free Breast Exam

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2009
    Messages:
    12,080
    Thanks Received:
    2,145
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    In your head
    Ratings:
    +2,927
    This Chart Says All You Need To Know About Jobs.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. SniperFire
    Offline

    SniperFire Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Messages:
    13,627
    Thanks Received:
    1,219
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Inside Your Head
    Ratings:
    +1,223
    oooh... I like that. An employment statistic which politicians cannot distort, evidently.

    Here is a googled result on 'employment-population ratio':


    EMPLOYMENT-POPULATION RATIO:

    The ratio of employed persons to the total civilian noninstitutionalized population 16 years old or older. Also termed the employment rate, the employment-population ratio is used as an alternative to the unemployment rate as an indicator of the utilization of labor resources.
    Because the employment-population ratio is the ratio of employment to population, it does not suffer from underestimation problems attributable to discouraged workers and other unemployed persons that enter and exit the labor force. In particular, the unemployment rate goes up and down as people enter and exit the labor force, even though these folks have no affect on employment and production. When discouraged workers leave the labor force, the unemployment rate goes down, but the employment-population ratio does not change. When high school and college students seek jobs during the summer months, the unemployment rate goes up, even though the employment-population ratio does not change.
    The calculation of the employment-population ratio is illustrated using this equation:

    employment-population ratio = employed
    persons
    total noninstitutionalized
    civilian population x 100
     
  6. pinqy
    Offline

    pinqy Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Messages:
    5,054
    Thanks Received:
    574
    Trophy Points:
    165
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Ratings:
    +1,009
    The problem with the emp-pop ratio is it doesn't tell you anything about people not working. How much is voluntary, how much involuntary? How easy/difficult is it to actually get a job? etc.

    For example, the 1950s had a very low emp-pop ratio but also had low Unemployment because of the larger number of housewives.
     
  7. SniperFire
    Offline

    SniperFire Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Messages:
    13,627
    Thanks Received:
    1,219
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Inside Your Head
    Ratings:
    +1,223
    True. But do you really think the underlying demographics have changed that much since the percitptious decline in 2008?
     
  8. pinqy
    Offline

    pinqy Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Messages:
    5,054
    Thanks Received:
    574
    Trophy Points:
    165
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Ratings:
    +1,009
    Oh, absolutely. Since Dec 2008, the number of people not in the labor force has gone up by 8.2 million. BUT people not in the labor force who want a job (meaning they're not available for work and/or aren't trying to work) only went up 1.15 million. While the percent of Not in the Labor Force who want a job did go up, there's enough left over to point to a demographic shift and it's not all "dropping out."

    While it can't really be measured directly, there is such a group as the "loosely attached to the labor force." These are people who don't "need" to work but will if conditions are favorable...students, housewives, retirees mostly. They work for "extra money" and not to fully provide for a household. In bad economic times, they drop out....they're not going to compete for jobs. I've seen a number of spouses, usually wives, especially with kids, where the spouse stops working or looking for work to raise kids and/or keep house. And of course more retirees are being added (though not quite to the degree may liberals try to claim).
     
  9. SniperFire
    Offline

    SniperFire Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Messages:
    13,627
    Thanks Received:
    1,219
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Inside Your Head
    Ratings:
    +1,223
    Good post.

    I believe an unemployment statistic which measures inclusively a precipitous drop in 'those loosely attached to the labor force' is actually a sound way to view employment in America.
     
  10. Oldstyle
    Offline

    Oldstyle Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    20,630
    Thanks Received:
    3,073
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Florida
    Ratings:
    +7,327
    With all due respect, Pinqy...I find it hard to fit your theory on "loosely attached" workers to what is going on at the moment. I'm of the mind that because of the bad economic time we've just gone through that there are many more students, housewives and retirees that would very much like to work (because they NEED money badly) but the jobs aren't there for them. Why? Well, one of the most obvious reasons is that people who would normally be working a full time position have been forced to take whatever they can get because their unemployment benefits have run out and they are desperate. Those people have taken part time work (oft times below their normal skill level) away from the students, housewives and retirees that would normally fill those positions.
     

Share This Page