Outsourcing the Picket Line

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by red states rule, Jul 25, 2007.

  1. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    You can't make this stuff up


    Outsourcing the Picket Line
    Carpenters Union Hires Homeless to Stage Protests

    By Keith L. Alexander
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, July 24, 2007; Page A01

    The picketers marching in a circle in front of a downtown Washington office building chanting about low wages do not seem fully focused on their message.

    Many have arrived with large suitcases or bags holding their belongings, which they keep in sight. Several are smoking cigarettes. One works a crossword puzzle. Another bangs a tambourine, while several drum on large white buckets. Some of the men walking the line call out to passing women, "Hey, baby." A few picketers gyrate and dance while chanting: "What do we want? Fair wages. When do we want them? Now."

    Although their placards identify the picketers as being with the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council of Carpenters, they are not union members.

    They're hired feet, or, as the union calls them, temporary workers, paid $8 an hour to picket. Many were recruited from homeless shelters or transitional houses. Several have recently been released from prison. Others are between jobs.

    "It's about the cash," said Tina Shaw, 44, who lives in a House of Ruth women's shelter and has walked the line at various sites. "We're against low wages, but I'm here for the cash."

    Carpenters locals across the country are outsourcing their picket lines, hiring the homeless, students, retirees and day laborers to get their message across. Larry Hujo, a spokesman for the Indiana-Kentucky Regional Council of Carpenters, calls it a "shift in the paradigm" of picketing.

    Political groups also are tapping into local homeless shelters for temps.

    One resident of the Community for Creative Non-Violence shelter earns $30 a day holding a sign outside a Metro stop protesting nuclear war. In 2004, residents of at least 10 shelters were paid to collect signatures on petitions in favor of legalized gambling. Residents call this type of work "lobbying."

    The carpenters union is one of the most active picketers in the District, routinely staging as many as eight picket lines a day at buildings where construction or renovation work is being done without union labor.

    Supporters of the practice consider it a creative tactic in an era of declining union membership and clout. But critics say the reliance on nonunion members -- who are paid $1 above minimum wage and receive no benefits -- diminishes the impact and undercuts a principle established over decades of union struggles.

    "If I was a member of the general public, and I asked someone picketing why they were there, and they said they don't work for the union and they were just hired to stand there, that wouldn't create a very positive impression on me, nor would it create a very sympathetic position," said Wayne Ranick, spokesman for the United Steelworkers of America.

    The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, the Mid-Atlantic local's parent, is one of seven unions in Change to Win, a group formed in 2005 after a split from the AFL-CIO. One reason the carpenters union left was because it favored more aggressive organizing.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/23/AR2007072302011.html?hpid=artslot
     
  2. lieberalism
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    lieberalism Active Member

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    libs will have them paid to vote next
     
  3. red states rule
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    red states rule Senior Member

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    They did that in 2000 and 2004
     

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