Ok Yankee's I am bringing this w/ me !!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Sandy73, May 4, 2004.

  1. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    ummm ok..:wtf:
     
  3. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    I am sure Laynce knows what this is !!
     
  4. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Well I have only had Old bay a couple of times but this has alot of different seasoning than old bay I think !
     
  5. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    I will try if I cook !:D
     
  6. janeeng
    Online

    janeeng Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    She'll be TOO DRUNK to cook! hahahahah!

    Now Sandy, i do now how to make shrimp etoufee! That is some good food there! I made it a couple of times with my Aunt, the last time I made it though, I cut the recipe in half, but not the cayenne pepper, and HOT it was!
     
  7. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Here is some cajun food glossary !



    Andouille (ahn-doo-wee) is a lean Cajun pork sausage with a spicy smoked flavor.
    A beignet (ban-yay) is a square French doughnut, deep fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar.

    Bisque (bisk) is a thick, cream or milk-based shellfish soup, usually made with crawfish, shrimp or oysters.

    Boucherie (boo-shuh-ree) is a community butchering which involves several families contributing the animal(s) to be slaughtered. Each family helps to process the different cuts of meat, like sausage, ham, boudin, chaudin, chops, and head cheese. Each family gets to take home their share of the yield. This process was done in late fall to provide meat throughout the cold months.

    Boudin (boo-dan) is a Cajun favorite, made by cooking ground pork rice and seasonings and stuffing the mixture into a casing. It is then cut like sausage and eaten any time of day.

    Bouilli (boo-yee), French for “boiled”, is a stew made from boiled meats.

    Bouillie (boo-yee) spelled this way means a boiled milk custard.

    Bourre (boo-ray), French for “stuffed”, is the name of a Cajun card game which requires the loser of a hand to stuff the pot with chips.

    Couche-couche (koosh-koosh) is still a popular breakfast food, made by frying cornmeal and topping it with milk and/or cane syrup.

    Cafèôu Lait (kah-fay-oh-lay) is coffee with steamed milk.

    The term Cajun (kay-jun) is an adaptation of the word “Cadien” used to describe the descendants of French settlers who began arriving in Louisiana in 1765 after 10 years of forced exile from their native Acadie (now Nova Scotia). Today, the term can describe anyone in South Louisiana who has become assimilated in Cajun culture.

    Cajun Cuisine is typified by long, slow cooking in covered pots and adaptation of the native food sources of South Louisiana.

    Cajun Trinity or "Holy Trinity" is the nickname for the three vegetables that are a must in Cajun/Creole cuisine; bell pepper, celery, onion.

    A courtbouillon (koo-bee-yawn) is a spicy tomato-based seafood stew.

    The term Creole (kree-yole) originally described people who were born in the colony of
    Louisiana and their descendants.

    Creole Cuisine is typified by access to and the use of peppers, spices, roux, and seasoning vegetables; developed from the early French, Spanish, and Afro-Caribbean influences in Louisiana.

    Etouffee (ay-too-fay) is gravy made by smothering seasoned vegetables. It is the ultimate Cajun dish, usually made with seafood in a smothered vegetable sauce.

    File (fee-lay) is an exotic spice made from powdered sassafras leaves and used as a garnish for gumbo.

    Fricassee (free-kay-say) is a stew made by browning then removing meat from the pan, making a roux with the pan drippings, and then returning meat to simmer in the thick gravy.


    Grillades (gree-yahdz) is diced beef round, veal, or pork that has been marinated for a few days in vinegar. Yields a rust-colored gravy (sauce rouillee) when cooked. Traditionally served for brunch with grits.

    Gumbo (gum-boh) is a roux-based soup of poultry, sausage, or seafood, served over rice.

    Jambalaya (jum-buh-lie-yuh) is a main dish usually made from rice and a combination of meats. Similar to paella.

    Lagniappe (lon-yop) is "something extra"; an unexpected treat or favor.

    Maque Chou (mock-shoo) is a dish made by scraping young corn off the cob and smothering the kernels in tomatoes, onion, and spices.

    A mirliton (mer-lee-tawn) is a vegetable pear or chayote.

    Pain Perdu (pan-pear-doo), means "lost bread". A breakfast treat made by soaking stale bread in an egg batter, then frying and topping with cane syrup or powdered sugar.

    Poboy is a sandwich made of meats stuffed in a length of French bread.

    Praline (prah-leen) is a candy usually made from cream, sugar, and pecans.

    Roux (roo) is a base for gumbo or stews made of flour browned in oil.

    A sauce piquante (saws-pee-kawnt), or "spicy sauce" is a spicy stew.

    Tasso (tah-soh) is strips of spiced pork or beef which are smoked like jerky and used to flavor many dishes; a sort of Cajun pepperoni.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  8. janeeng
    Online

    janeeng Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    BAD BOY! what will wifey think? hahahahahah!
     
  9. Sandy73
    Online

    Sandy73 Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    Well gotta go !! Nighty night !!
     
  10. janeeng
    Online

    janeeng Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    I am right behind you Sandy! Good Night and talk to you tomorrow - working tomorrow night, but on after that. I am sure I will talk to you before that though!
     

Share This Page