Obesity's price tag

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by MaggieMae, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. MaggieMae
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    MaggieMae Reality bits

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    Case in point, from THE WEEK, July 30, 2010 issue:

    Almost 10 Percent of U.S. Medical Costs Tied to Obesity

    Only a return to healthy behaviors will bring expenditures down, experts say.
    By Steven Reinberg
    HealthDay Reporter
    July 28

    MONDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity in the United States now carries the hefty price tag of $147 billion per year in direct medical costs, just over 9 percent of all medical spending, experts report.

    In fact, people who are obese spend almost $1,500 more each year on health care -- about 41 percent more than an average-weight person. Beyond those costs are the disability and early deaths caused by obesity, Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a press conference Monday.

    "Obesity, and with it diabetes, are the only major health problems that are getting worse in this country, and they are getting worse rapidly," Frieden said. "The average American is now 23 pounds overweight."

    Frieden's comments were made at the CDC's "Weight of the Nation" conference, held this week in Washington, D.C.

    Between 1998 and and 2006, obesity rates in the United States increased 37 percent and now one in three adults in the country are obese. Experts have long known the toll overweight takes on health, but the new report, published in the July 27 online edition of Health Affairs, outlines the financial cost of obesity.

    "A normal-weight individual will spend about $3,400 per year in medical expenditures and that number rises to about $4,870 if that individual is obese," study author Eric Finkelstein, director, RTI Public Health Economics Program in Research Triangle Park, N.C., said during the press conference.

    For people on Medicare, average expenses for a normal-weight person average about $4,700 a year, while costs for an obese person range about $6,400 annually, Finkelstein said.

    The biggest driver of these excess costs are prescription drugs, Finkelstein said. Among the normal-weight population, prescription drug costs average about $700 a year, but among those who are obese the cost rises to about $1,300 a year, an 80 percent increase, he said.

    "For Medicare, the costs of obesity are about 72 percent greater just for prescription drugs," Finkelstein said. An obese person on Medicare is going to pay $1,400 in drug costs more a year than a normal-weight person, he said.

    "Today's report demonstrating the clear link between rising rates of obesity and increasing medical costs is alarming, but not unexpected," Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation said in a statement. "Obesity is the driver of so many chronic conditions -- heart disease, diabetes, cancer -- that generate the exorbitant costs that are crushing our health-care system," she said.

    "The only way to show real savings in health expenditures in the future is through efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity and related health conditions," Finkelstein said.

    Hoping to turn the tide of the obesity epidemic, the CDC is taking several steps it hopes will alert people to the problem and get Americans to make the changes need to reduce obesity.

    Among the strategies the CDC is promoting are making healthy food more available, promoting more choices of healthy foods, promoting breast-feeding, encouraging physical activity and creating sites in communities that support physical activity, Dr. William H. Dietz, director of CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, said during the press conference.

    "These recommendations, I believe, set the foundation for the community interventions necessary to reverse this problem in the United States," Dietz said.

    One of the biggest problems facing Americans is soaring consumption of soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks, which add almost 150 calories to the daily diet, Frieden said.

    Frieden believes that taxing sodas and other sugar-sweetened drinks will help cut down on consumption and raise revenues that can be used to fight the obesity epidemic.

    The upshot of Monday's meeting is that stemming the obesity epidemic is going to take a societal effort.

    "Reversing obesity is not going to be done successfully with individual effort," Frieden said. "We did not get to this situation over the past three decades because of any change in our genetics or any change in our food preferences. We got to this stage of the epidemic because of a change in our environment and only a change in our environment again will allow us to get back to a healthier place," he said.
     
  2. boedicca
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    boedicca Uppity Water Nymph Supporting Member

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    What IS your point in posting this?

    The ObamaCare you support forces all of us to pay for the extraordinary care for the obese. Are they now going to be a target for rationed/denied care under the Berwick model?

    That must be why we are all going to be forced to provide our BMI electronically to the government.
     
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  3. MaggieMae
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    MaggieMae Reality bits

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    You must be fat.
     
  4. boedicca
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    boedicca Uppity Water Nymph Supporting Member

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    You're projecting.

    I'd rather not pay for obese people's health care via Government Fiat.

    You're the one who posted this - what is your purpose? Are you demonizing the obese? Are they victims?
     
  5. Tank
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    Tank Gold Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  6. asterism
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    asterism Congress != Progress

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    Should the government control their food choices or let them burn?
     
  7. asterism
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    asterism Congress != Progress

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    Where else on the planet are historically poor demographics (as defined by government standards) obese?

    Can we say that the government model of eradicating poverty has failed, and can we say that no person who is obese is poor?
     
  8. MaggieMae
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    MaggieMae Reality bits

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    I think it's safe to say that in the United States, it's cheaper to eat fattening foods. When everthing purchased off the shelf in supermarkets contains sugar or corn syrup, loaded up with salt and mystery ingredients, people will get fat unless they exercise it off. And we all know the only exercise most of us get is walking from the kitchen chair to the recliner or computer chair. The only "blame" I have for the shocking statistics is that we have allowed this to happen. The articles simply point out that we're really in trouble if it continues. But every time even partial solutions are offered it's OH NO!!! DON'T TAKE AWAY MY 'RIGHT' TO BE FAT IF I WANT TO BE!!!
     
  9. asterism
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    asterism Congress != Progress

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    I agree. Poor people by my standards don't get fat regardless of what they eat. Poor people starve.

    Not true. There are plenty of choices on supermarket shelves that do not contain those ingredients in unhealthy levels.

    True. So perhaps they are fat because they don't exercise. They certainly aren't fat because they don't get enough caloric intake and nutrients to subsist. Therefore they aren't poor and they aren't fat because they don't have food and exercise choices.

    That might be the most of "you," it certainly isn't the most of "us" nor should it be the most of anyone who is called "poor."

    We agree there. Time to stop subsidizing fat people with more money for "poor" choices and time to actually help out those that are actually poor. If you top the scales at 350 lbs., you aren't poor.

    I think anyone on government assistance should relinquish the right to be fat. Heck, that's where this whole healthcare thing is headed anyway, "it affects us all" and such.
     
  10. Ragnar
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    Ragnar <--- Pic is not me

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    So the "partial solutions" include government control of our doctors, the poor, our personal diets, the supermarkets, food producers, our personal exercise guru's, the makers of recliners and computer chairs, and felony charges for depraved indifference for those who allow our fellow citizens to get fat?
    :razz:

    Sounds like a winner of a political platform to me. No. Really. :(:(:(
     

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