OBAMAGATEs: Is Barrack Obama the "Black" President of The United States?

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by sidneyworld, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. sidneyworld
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    sidneyworld Senior Member

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    Since when does a President condem an entire police force before properly reviewing all circumstances? Not only was his comment about the Cambridge Police Department acting "stupidly" a clear breach of presidential protocol, but it also lends itself to favoritism which is a colossal compromise of ethics in acting in the best interest of the citizens of this country. All citizens of all races.

    Harvard scholar on race relations, Henry Louis Gates Jr. has been a long time friend of President Obama. But that's just the beginning of what is completely irresponsible behavior by both Prof. Gates, and President Obama's subsequent reaction to such an event. An event I truly believe was a trigger response to Gates' own racial profiling against white cops.

    Okay, first of all, let's review what happened:

    "...Gates had just arrived home to his Cambridge house from a trip abroad to find his front door stuck shut. As he and the driver who brought him from the airport tried to push it open, a passerby called police with a report of a possible break-in. Crowley arrived and demanded that Gates, now inside, show him identification. Crowley’s police report said Gates behaved belligerently when he questioned him, which Gates denied. Authorities dropped the charge Tuesday after it ignited accusations of racism...."

    Officer at eye of storm says he won’t apologize - The Boston Globe

    "Sgt. James Crowley said Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. was combative from the moment the officer arrived at his house last week to respond to a call about a possible burglary. As the confrontation escalated, Crowley said he warned Gates that he risked arrest.

    "The second warning was with me holding a set of handcuffs in my hands -- something I really didn't want to do," Crowley said in a radio interview. "The professor at any time could have resolved the issue by quieting down and/or going back inside his house."

    Crowley's account came on a day of dizzying debate over his actions, a furor that was touched off by President Obama's remarks at a news conference Wednesday night, when he linked Gates's arrest to the nation's long history of racial profiling and said the police had "acted stupidly."

    The events drew Obama into the first racial controversy of his presidency. The personalized critique was rare for a president, and demonstrated the perspective Obama brings to the Oval Office.

    "Three years ago, we would not have been having this conversation in this way," said Eddie S. Glaude, a professor of theology and African American studies at Princeton.

    Obama stood by his criticism, telling ABC News's Terry Moran he was "surprised" his statement had sparked such controversy."


    washingtonpost.com

    Since when are Blacks in this country above the law?

    Anne Marie
     
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  2. sidneyworld
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    sidneyworld Senior Member

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    [youtube]b2jZI1nn9qo[/youtube]

    What kind of an example is a Harvard Professor on race relations, and his friend the President of the United States who also happens to be black setting, given the politically disproportioned climate on race relations in this country?

    This behavior completely undermines the efforts of law enforcement to protect the public, and compromises the integrity of all law enforcement in this country.

    Anne Marie
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  3. Jon
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    Jon The CPA

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    Obama's racism is no surprise. He's a child of the Jeremiah Wright school of thought.
     
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  4. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Yea!!!

    We don't want Americans to question what their government does in their name...and we sure as heck don't want them to THINK about us killing babies, and innocent Iraqis...

    SEPT. 16, 2001

    Sound bite: broadcast 24/7 on the "liberal" media:
    "We've bombed Hiroshima, we've bombed Nagasaki, we've nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon and we never batted an eye. . . . We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant. Because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back into our own front yards. America's chickens are coming home to roost."

    Excerpt from Wright's Sermon:
    "Every public service of worship I have heard about so far in the wake of the American tragedy has had, in its prayers and in its preachments, sympathy and compassion for those who were killed and for their families. And God's guidance upon the selected presidents and our war machine as they do what they do and what they got to do.

    "Paybacks. There's a move in Psalm 137 from thoughts of paying tithes to thoughts of paying back. A move if you will from worship to war. A move in other words from the worship of the God of creation to war against those whom God created. And I want you to notice very carefully the next move. One of the reasons this psalm is rarely read in its entirety because it is a move that spotlights the insanity of the cycle of violence and the cycle of hatred.

    "Look at the verse, Verse 9: 'Happy shall they be who take your little ones and dash them against the rocks.' The people of faith, by the rivers of Babylon, how should we sing the Lord's song if I forget thee? The people of faith have moved from the hatred of armed enemies, these soldiers who captured the King, those soldiers who slaughtered his sons and put his eyes out, the soldiers who sacked the city, burned their towns, burned the temple, burned their towers. They moved from the hatred of armed enemies to the hatred of unarmed innocents. The babies. The babies. Blessed are they who dash your babies' brains against a rock. And that, my beloved, is a dangerous place to be.

    "Yet that is where the people of faith are in 551 B.C. and that is where far too many people of faith are in 2001 A.D. We have moved from the hatred of armed enemies to the hatred of unarmed innocents. We want revenge. We want paybacks and we don't care who gets hurt in the process.

    "Now, I asked the Lord, what should our response be in light of such an unthinkable act?

    . . . This is a time of self-examination. The Lord said to me: 'How is our relationship doing, Jeremiah? How often do you talk to me personally? How often do you let me talk to you privately? How much time do you spend trying to get right with me? Or do you spend all your time trying to get other folk right?' This is a time for me to examine my own relationship with God. Is it real or is it fake? Is it forever or is it for show? Is it something you do for the sake of the public or is it something you do for the sake of eternity? This is a time to examine my own relationship and a time for you to examine your own relationship with God. Self-examination."
     
  5. N4mddissent
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    N4mddissent Active Member

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    I think both sides have some share in the blame. The story of an accomplished black man arousing suspicion entering his own home is not a new one in America. But despite the perhaps good intentions of the caller reporting the incident, it certainly acted as a sobering reminder to Professor Gates of lingering prejudice. Should he have been offended? Well, if it had been white male of the same age and in the same situation, would it be less likely that a call would have been made about a break-in? If you, like myself, believe that is the case, then there is an offensive aspect to the situation.

    Of course, this doesn't mean the police are guilty of the offensive action, since they were merely responding to the information they were given. Once they were there and the ensuing confrontation occurred, then it seems that both parties acted emotionally rather than rationally.

    While we do not have all the facts, we can probably assume there was some sort of heated verbal exchange.

    This is one person's word against another. It doesn't provide us with any evidence indicating whether either account is accurate, and the term "belligerently" is so vague as to be useless.

    Whether Professor Gates was combative or belligerent is questionable both because there is no empirical evidence and because whether someone is "belligerent" is a subjective assessment and what might be viewed as "assertive" language to one person may be viewed as "belligerent" by another. I would speculate that Professor Gates did likely express some sort of criticism and/or displeasure, probably in an angry or forceful tone, given the undercurrents of racism inherent in the situation. However, I believe it would behoove Professor Gates to consider that criticism directed at the police officers concerning their presence and requests for identification are misplaced. If the officers had seen the Professor going into the house and on their own had been suspicious, then issues of profiling and racism would be more relevant and criticism toward the officers perhaps justified. But my understanding is that this is not the case. Any initial criticism should have been directed toward the neighbor, rather than the responding officers.

    Having said that, it is merely speculation since we don't know exactly what Prof. Gates said nor the tone in which it was said. However, since Professor Gates is 58 years old and walks with a cane, it is unlikely that the officer would have felt physically threatened. In the absence of any threat of physical harm, at worst, the officer would have been subjected to some form of verbal tirade. The sort that occur here on these boards all the time. In that case, the situation could have been resolved by simply leaving. Considering the Professor was in his own home and had done nothing wrong up until the point where he was alledgedly belligerent, then it seems this would have certainly been the best option. After all, I think any of us would feel a bit indignant if one day we found the police arriving and disturbing us in the privacy of our own home demanding proof of identification. It is anethema to American ideas of liberty and privacy. Any of us might have a visceral outrage in the circumstances, regardless of race.

    Some may feel that the Professor was intentionally confrontational. They may believe he saw it as an opportunity to get publicity and play the role of victim to justify some agenda, if he could goad the officers into arresting him.

    Others may feel that the officers were inherently racist and arrested Professor Gates because he was being "uppity".

    I doubt both of these extremes. I feel it was a situation where emotions on both sides overpowered clear thinking. In any case, the officer's actions were stupid. Perhaps Professor Gates behaved stupidly as well, but we don't have enough reliable information to determine if that is the case. The arrest is a certainty. I am not intending to cast aspersions on the officer. After all, one can exhibit stupid behavior without being stupid. I'm sure all of us have made stupid decisions or behaved stupidly in an emotional situation. It just indicates the officer was human.

    Happily, though, the situation may have a productive resolution.

    President Obama called the Cambridge police officer who arrested his friend, prominent Harvard University Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr...Representatives of Sgt. James Crowley released a statement saying Crowley was "profoundly grateful" for the phone call.

    "It is clear to us from this conversation that the president respects police officers and the often difficult and dangerous situations we face on a daily basis. We appreciate his sincere interest and willingness to reconsider his remarks about the Cambridge Police Department," the statement read.
    ...

    "I continue to believe, based on what I have heard, that there was an overreaction in pulling Professor Gates out of his home to the station," the president added. "I also continue to believe, based on what I heard, that Professor Gates probably overreacted as well. My sense is you've got two good people in a circumstance in which neither of them were able to resolve the incident in the way that it should have been resolved and the way they would have liked it to be resolved."

    But Obama said he had a cordial conversation with Crowley, who had complained about the president's criticism. Obama said laughingly he had a discussion with Crowley about the three of them having beer at the White House.

    The president's spokesman said it was Crowley's idea for the three to get together for a beer. According to Gates' attorney, Gates doesn't drink beer but he'll show-up for the meeting.



    Link
     
  6. sidneyworld
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    sidneyworld Senior Member

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    Hi Dissent,

    Very well done post!

    "Whether Professor Gates was combative or belligerent is questionable both because there is no empirical evidence and because whether someone is "belligerent" is a subjective assessment and what might be viewed as "assertive" language to one person may be viewed as "belligerent" by another. I would speculate that Professor Gates did likely express some sort of criticism and/or displeasure, probably in an angry or forceful tone, given the undercurrents of racism inherent in the situation. However, I believe it would behoove Professor Gates to consider that criticism directed at the police officers concerning their presence and requests for identification are misplaced. If the officers had seen the Professor going into the house and on their own had been suspicious, then issues of profiling and racism would be more relevant and criticism toward the officers perhaps justified. But my understanding is that this is not the case. Any initial criticism should have been directed toward the neighbor, rather than the responding officers.

    Having said that, it is merely speculation since we don't know exactly what Prof. Gates said nor the tone in which it was said. However, since Professor Gates is 58 years old and walks with a cane, it is unlikely that the officer would have felt physically threatened. In the absence of any threat of physical harm, at worst, the officer would have been subjected to some form of verbal tirade. The sort that occur here on these boards all the time. In that case, the situation could have been resolved by simply leaving. Considering the Professor was in his own home and had done nothing wrong up until the point where he was alledgedly belligerent, then it seems this would have certainly been the best option. After all, I think any of us would feel a bit indignant if one day we found the police arriving and disturbing us in the privacy of our own home demanding proof of identification. It is anethema to American ideas of liberty and privacy. Any of us might have a visceral outrage in the circumstances, regardless of race."
    M4MDDissent #5

    There are two issues here, actually three.

    Did the officers use excessive force given the circumstances of entering a home a neighbor believed was potentially broken into?

    To what extend can an individual express disgust before crossing the line with law enforcement? Do we have a lawful obligation to concede any verbal contention against an officer, especially under what might be perceived as an illegal search or temporary incarceration?

    And most importantly, what was President Obama's perspective, in exercising presidential protocols to make such a short sighted and potentially damaging statement? I find this far more disturbing than the actual incident.

    Anne Marie
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  7. sidneyworld
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    sidneyworld Senior Member

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    BFGRIN,

    I'm not sure what your position is on this issue. But I will comment on Rev. Wrights sermon/statement.

    Not unlike Louis Farrakhan, Rev. Wright demonstrates words of wisdom in terms of the profoundly evident course humanity has taken, quite often, in the name of God. That self reflection and responsibility is usually the first stepping stone into gaining some higher ground, some better enlightened perspective in dealing with people, with cultures and of course race relations, before anyone raises their swords. But what Rev. Wright and Farrahkan have in common, and to their notable politically spiritual demise, is the concentration of blame in attempting to single out the greatest offenders. Jews and Whites. The irony of some of their statements perpetuates the separation of race and religion as it maintains a rally of prejudices and reverse prejudices that simply cannot rise above the diabtribe. It's no longer words of wisdom when they are demonstrated to presumably apply to specific groups.

    Anne Marie
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Since when does a police officer arrest someone that has established that he is the owner of the home? Since when is being rude to an officer a crime worthy of arrest? Gates was wrong in being belligerant, the officer was even more wrong in continueing the confrontation just because he did not like Gates attitude.
     
  9. Sweet Willy
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    #1 I don't see any excessive force being used to establish Gates ID. It appears that Gates was irritated at being questioned in his own home about his right to be there. I would be too.

    #2 The "line" in expressing disgust, on my property, is where ever I decide it should be. It's my home. My yard. My rules. No one gets to make judgement calls at my house but me. So long as my neighbors don't complain and I don't violate any decibel level that may be an ordinance. I married a woman with two teenage daughters and if communicating by screaming at each other was against the law, they would have all been in jail. Can I scream at the TV when my favorite team loses? Can I screan at the dog if it craps on the floor? Is it just cops that I'm not allowed to scream at? What makes them special in my house?

    #3 Obama should have remained silent on the issue. The President has no business making public comments about such a trivial issue.
     
  10. Big Black Dog
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    Big Black Dog Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Gates tried to use the race card and "I'm somebody important" card on a policeman just trying to do his job and it blew up in his face. I just love it! Our beloved (sic) President Obama used the race card on national TV and it blew up in his face too. I think both of these people, to be so highly educated, acted like a complete ass and they each got what they deserved. Obama has shown his true colors with this incident because he made a comment about an issued that he said on national TV he had no idea what the facts were in the case but "The Cambridge Police acted stupidly." This Gates fellow, to be so highly educated showed his true colors concerning raceism, just as the President did. Both acted like a complete ass. Obama is the most unPresidential person I have ever seen in the White House and it's pretty sickening.
     

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