NYT: Socialism Sucks

Discussion in 'Politics' started by chanel, May 24, 2010.

  1. chanel
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    chanel Silver Member

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    This story by Steven Erlanger of the New York Times:

    Must-Read Of the Day: The Times Discovers That European Socialism Sucks - Big Journalism


    Well - duh.
     
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  2. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Yea this is pretty shocking coming from the NY Times. Thanks.
     
  3. rikules
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    rikules fighting thugs and cons

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    ALL socialism sucks

    except for social security
    and medicare
    and medicaid
    and I really do think I should get tax breaks for my wife and 18 kids
    while simgle people and responsible liberal parents with only 1 or 2 children pay MUCH MORE in taxes than I do

    but I HATE SOCIALISM!
     
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  4. Flopper
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    Flopper Gold Member

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    Europe is not a single country even thou they are moving in that direction. The financial problems are centered primarily in Spain, Greece, and Italy. As you go north things get better. Countries such as Switzerland, and Sweden are on very sound financial footing yet they have socialized medicine and social security. I don't think it is fair to say that the existence of these programs are the problem. It is how the programs are managed that causes the problem. In southern Europe retirement ages have been set too low. In fact in Greece they are raising it by 5 years which should bring it in line with the US retirement ages.

    Another problem is that many people just don't pay taxes that they owe Tax rates in the southern Europe are quite high compared to the US which limits their options for increasing revenue.

    I think that there should be some adjustments in our Social Security in the form of slightly higher taxes and an increases in retirement age. I doubt that much can be done with Medicare.
     
  5. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    The US is ranked 42nd on child mortality, behind most of Europe, and Cuba. :D
     
  6. boedicca
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    boedicca Uppity Water Nymph Supporting Member

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    That is a bogus statistic. The U.S. includes severely premature babies as live births. In many parts of the world, including advanced European nations, such babies are classified as still births and allowed to die post partum.

    The exclusion of any high-risk infants from the denominator or numerator in reported IMRs can be problematic for comparisons. Many countries, including the United States, Sweden or Germany, count an infant exhibiting any sign of life as alive, no matter the month of gestation or the size, but according to United States Centers for Disease Control researchers,[6] some other countries differ in these practices. All of the countries named adopted the WHO definitions in the late 1980s or early 1990s,[7] which are used throughout the European Union.[8] However, in 2009, the US CDC issued a report which stated that the American rates of infant mortality were affected by the United States' high rates of premature babies compared to European countries and which outlines the differences in reporting requirements between the United States and Europe, noting that France, the Czech Republic, Ireland, the Netherlands, and Poland do not report all live births of babies under 500 g and/or 22 weeks of gestation.[6][9][10] However, the report also concludes that the differences in reporting are unlikely to be the primary explanation for the United States’ relatively low international ranking.[10]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infant_mortality#Comparing_infant_mortality_rates


    The report includes some weasel wording to minimize the difference in how live birth is defined in various countries - but it is a factor. Two other major factors are the lifestyle of the parents, especially the mother, and the mother's age.
     
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    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  7. Big Black Dog
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    Big Black Dog Gold Member Supporting Member

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    Socialism doesn't suck nearly as much as the dumb asses do in Washington that are trying to ram socialism down our throats. Seems like they could see that it isn't working out so well in other parts of the world and maybe GET A CLUE.
     

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