Northwest tribes resume sacred ritual: Hunting bison

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Sunni Man, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Sunni Man
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    Sunni Man Diamond Member

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    GARDINER, Mont. — Knee deep in snow, Francis Marsh crouched behind a boulder and peered through the rifle scope at his target 40 yards away. He breathed in deeply to calm his racing heart.

    Picturesque mountain peaks rose behind him. The sunlight glittered off the snow, and all was quiet and still.

    Ever so slowly, he exhaled, waited, then pulled the trigger.

    The bison dropped to its big belly. Francis gasped for air — and with that shot became one of the first members of an Oregon Indian tribe to hunt buffalo in more than a century.

    For years, Jim Marsh — Francis' father — had heard stories about his great-grandmother's buffalo-hide teepee, the last of its kind in their family. He'd seen photos of it, but buffalo were a thing of the past.

    The Cayuse Indians once traveled hundreds of miles on horseback to hunt bison, a lean meat rich in protein and high in cultural significance. Those hunts ended in the late 1800s, as federal agents restricted travel from their reservation on the Columbia River plateau and the decimated bison herds were largely confined to Yellowstone National Park.

    Jim Marsh's great-grandfather was the last family member to travel across the Rocky Mountains to hunt bison.

    But in 2006, the state of Montana gave permission to the Nez Perce of Idaho and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes of northwest Montana to hunt bison on federal lands outside Yellowstone.

    Hunting is illegal in the park, but during harsh winters, bison migrate to lower elevations outside the park in search of food. The tribes' 1855 treaties with the federal government grant them the right to hunt on traditional hunting grounds on open, unclaimed land, such as the current day Gallatin National Forest bordering the park.

    Tribes resume sacred ritual: Hunting bison - U.S. news - Life - msnbc.com
     
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  2. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    Good for them.
     
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  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    No bow or spear ?
     
  4. Jeremy
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    Jeremy TRANSFER!!!

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    Good.
     
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  5. Tank
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    Tank Gold Member

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    Thats not how real Indians hunt.
     
  6. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    True, we use Cobra gunships now.
     
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  7. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Uncle Ferd says don't try to ride a bison - dey'll buck ya...

    Yellowstone proposes controversial slaughter of 1,000 bison
    Thursday 19 November 2015 - National park authorities want to kill one in five animals to bring population down to target size
    See also:

    Bison tosses Australian tourist into air at Yellowstone national park
    Tuesday 2 June 2015 - Man, 62, taken to hospital after attack while photographing animal near Old Faithful geyser, where a teenage girl was gored a few weeks earlier
     
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  8. longknife
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    longknife Platinum Member

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    Hunting the 1,000 females and calves is a simple matter of keeping the remainder of the herds from overgrazing and dying of hunger.

    I would hope that such an action is overseen by American Indian tribal authorities to insure the bison are properly slaughtered and all parts used traditionally.

    Tanned hides.
    Hooves for glue.
    Bones for sculpture and other uses.
    And so on.
     
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  9. Delta4Embassy
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    Delta4Embassy Gold Member

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    Natives had rifles 'back in the day' too.
     
  10. martybegan
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    martybegan Gold Member

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    Opposition to wildlife/game management often is based on the "cute/fuzzy" fixation on individual animals, and ignores the overriding goal of such programs, maintaining the herd, and thus the species.

    It's the same thing big game management hunting opponents have an issue with.
     
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