Military Memories

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by JOKER96BRAVO, Dec 23, 2004.

  1. JOKER96BRAVO
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    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

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    So me and no1tovote4 were chating last night and we sparked up an
    interesting conversation about survival training. I've seen this subject
    started by Mr P on another thread so, let's here some stories...
     
  2. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Traveling back in a small convoy from Hohenfels Germany, to our home station in Wackernheim, we found ourselves (4 or 5 HMMWVs, one 5-ton wrecker, and one 5 ton carrying the arms room) at the back of a line of stopped traffic. One of the Vehicles ahead radio'd back about seeing another Military truck upside down, on the shoulder of the autobahn. As we approached we noticed a 5-Ton truck, laying there upside down. The truck was facing the wrong direction, on the right shoulder.

    I stopped my vehicle and ran to the truck. There were already some German rescue personnel there milling around. I went to my stomach and low crawled under the hood of the truck in a narrow space created due to a shallow ditch the truck was laying upon. As I found the passenger, he was moaning something about 'did you see that car?' I grabbed his shoulder and told him "Hey! You're going to be okay - we're here now. We're soldiers." He, laying on his back, tilted his head to look at me. There were two patches of skin on his forehead hanging down, as is somebody used a cheese slicer and pulled off two pieces of his skin. The white bone of his forehead was exposed. To my left was a kevlar helmet, appearing to be holding up part of the truck's windshield frame. I wondered if that was keeping the truck from collapsing. I wiggled around, and attemped to place my arms under the man, who I thought was now screaming. I was under him, and attempted to slide him out - sort of like a person rescues a swimmer. The man wouldn't budge. I peeked around to tell him to be quiet - not to panic. He was unconscious but the screaming continued. It was then I noticed the wadded up driver - he was upside down, still in a seated position. I couldn't see his face; just what looked like an accordian of BDU.

    I wiggled around again, and stayed there, holding the hand of the passenger...trying to coax him back to consciousness. He'd drift in an out - rambling, etc. I felt a tug on my legs at this point.

    "Pemberton! Slide out - we're going to use the wrecker to raise the truck"

    I told the passenger I'd be back, and eased out from under the truck.

    As my girlfriend was german, I spoke a bit - I coordinated efforts with the German rescue workers so we'd all be on the same sheet of music. We got the wrecker up and rigged - attached to the under body of the 5-ton. Due to positioning and weight, we could only lift the over-turned vehicle a couple feet, before the one side of the wrecker started lifting up. Passers-by hopped on the far side of the truck, in an attempt to add weight - like sail-boat racers do.

    Back to the passenger - a couple german rescue workers had him nearly free. I went to the man's head, to hold his neck steady. They moved him up the slight incline to an ambulance. When I removed my hand, I looked down to see my palm covered in blood.

    Now for the driver. The driver was seated, Still screaming bloody-murder but we could not remove him. Myself and a german rescue worker attemped to pull back (up) on the seat, to create space. After some working, we freed the man.

    The man wore a set of Army Birth Control Glasses...the glass had broken in to tiny cubes, and filled his eyes - as if the guy had snow-cones instead of eyeballs. Hence all the screaming, I guess.

    Back at the ambulance, I provided a bit of translation - as to where the soldiers would be going, getting their names, unit info (which we found on the vehicles MotorPool dispatch), etc.

    Shortly thereafter, a helo landed and I walked out with the first guy; he was to be air-lifted. As we approached the helicopter, he opened his eyes and made eye-contact with me. A tear rolled down his face. I put my hand on his shoulder and said "You'll be fine, Sergeant. You'll be just fine."

    Word came later both men survived. The first had a metal plate put in his head, the 2nd had his eyes removed, glass cleaned out of his sockets, then eyes 're-installed'. Not sure how any of that works - but that's the word that came down.

    That event will be with me forever - as will the image of those two soldiers.
     
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  3. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    Wow heavy! We were talking about all the silly things that they did during training. That is much more emotional.

    I think I might be tearing up here.

    :cry:

    One time while in Boot Camp I was walking back from a Medical Appointment alone. As I was walking I was looking for a landmark (we had only been there days) and was surprised by a CC (Company Commander) and saluted all messed up. The next day I had to stand on a rock and salute every seagull that flew by for about 4 hours....

    Then I had to go to a MASH (Make a Sailor Hurt) session with the SEALS to boot. I definitely learned how to salute after that!
     
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  4. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    Didn't mean to post up w/ a downer! :)


    Here's one more light-hearted:

    in AIT (Training after Basic) we had a drill sergeant - Drill Sergeant Pelish (sp?). He was the "Ninja Master" of the group. He'd caution soldiers about keeping the key to their wall locker around their neck. He wanted ppl to have combination locks.

    There were times he'd sneak in, remove someone's dog-tags - while they slept, open their locker, and either mess it up, or say, remove several pairs of their BDU. :)
     
  5. JOKER96BRAVO
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    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

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    We had this kid in AIT who thought he could turn invisible.
    That was some funny shit. He'd be standing flat against a wall and
    we would say hi to him and he'd say "you can see me??? damn I need to
    practice more."
     
  6. freeandfun1
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    freeandfun1 VIP Member

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    When I was at Ft. Riley, KS, my first duty station after AIT back in `86, on our first field exercise, I went out into the bushes to, well, take care of business. As the sun rose and the scene around me became more clear, I realized I was take'n a dump in the middle of a patch of marijuana plants that stood at least 6 - 8 feet tall. I thought I was in heaven!

    I was told later that it was nothing but "headache" weed and wouldn't do anything. More hemp than "pot".
     
  7. JOKER96BRAVO
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    JOKER96BRAVO Senior Member

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    I had some field time with DEA and we busted this dude with 200 lbs
    of real weed in his trailor... We were all in shock.
     
  8. no1tovote4
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    no1tovote4 VIP Member

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    Now that everybody has read this, I will be honest with you. I was in the Boy Scouts from 12 to 16. In my haste to salute my old muscle memory took place and I gave the man a Boy Scout salute! I was so embarrassed!

    :eek:
     
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  9. gaffer
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    gaffer Member

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    AIT

    In my day there were two meanings Adanced Individual Training for those not going into the infantry. Advanced Infantry Training for those who did. I was in the latter group. Did my AIT at Ft Polk La. at a place called Tigerland. We didn't have survival training, we did have a course called escape and evasion. They set up a prison camp. We had to cross a long distance of many miles in the dark and try to avoid being captured. Those who got caught were taken to the camp and given a taste of POW status. Didn't look like fun to me. I did avoid getting caught, but I happened upon the campand watched what was going on from outside.It inspired me to avoid capture at all costs.

    We never did any of the survival things like live off the land. We definately learned how to evade. And there were a number of serious fights with the "enemy" troops out to capture us. They didn't tell us we couldn't fight.
     
  10. Trinity
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    Trinity VIP Member

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    Aw cmon, dad tell em about that time you got blown out of that hole.

    It's a riot to hear him tell it now, however at the time I'm sure it wasn't the least bit funny!
     

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