Mental Health is it still taboo in america?

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by dukect45, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. dukect45
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    dukect45 VIP Member

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    I just want to ask that question
     
  2. Noomi
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    Noomi Ninja Kicker Supporting Member

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    What makes you think that it is?
     
  3. old navy
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    old navy <<< Action Figures

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    yes, but not as big a taboo. There are education campaigns for patients, family, and the rest of society that debunks mis-understandings and provides hope and help. The U.S. miltary, as in so many other areas of medical advances, is doing great things for victims of PTSD, TBI, and other such conditions.

    One very important need in the area of education though is prospective employers of post-911 veterans. Many think that all have mental illness and discriminate against them in the hiring process.
     
  4. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    Not at all, just look at our Vice President, Joe Biden
     
  5. dblack
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    dblack Gold Member

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    Mental health is strictly taboo.

    Mental illness, however, is quite popular.
     
  6. barry1960
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    barry1960 VIP Member

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    Sadly, I would say yes, my son is autistic which means he has various self-stimulation type behaviors such as flapping hands, etc. I live in a someone affluent neighborhood and my neighbors treat him as if he has a communicable disease when I walk with him down the sidewalk. I helped my neighbor get her child's pant leg free of a bicyclye chain. The following day she saw my son coming down the sidewalk so she scooped up her daughter screaming "Get away from him." My son has no violent tendencies, going to the opposite extreme of passivity.

    Churches who state they will open their doors to anyone, prefer not to have my son attend. The school district, overwhelmed with the increase in autism, has displayed behavior that is unbelievable. When my son was struck repeatedly in the face by another student the school administrator's response was "Given his disability, he needs to pick himself back up and get used to it." This comes from a district with a no tolerance policy. We home school now. i watch church on television.

    If my son had leukemia people would be lined up around the block to help. My city prides itself on its huge heart in helping others. People talk about identifying autism early, but you have to fight to receive help. Until recently autism was excluded from my health insurance so I had to come up with alternative diagnosis to receive treatment such as speech delay, etc. Now that coverage for autism is mandated, my insurance excludes types of treatment that are used to treat autism.
     

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