Largest Prime Number found:

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by dmp, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    From the files of 'who gives a shit' - subfolder 'We need a hobby'.

    :D

     
  2. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    I think mathematicians do it in order to impress babes or to find a way to express the Federal Debt if Congress and Dubya keep spending money like a drunken sailor....

    Not to be outdone, .. here is the value of "pi" to 1,000,000 places.

    http://3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592.com/

    What is "pi"? It is the ratio of a circle's circumference (the distance around the circle) to its diameter (the distance from side of the cicle to the other if you pass through the center)... also see

    http://mathforum.org/isaac/problems/pi1.html
     
  3. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    And 1+1=3….It’s true. :tng:
     
  4. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    I've heard of the Mersenne primes. The algorithm has been around for decades, but takes so much power to operate, it's mind boggling. Hackers once took control of the AT&T mainframe for several months, devoting all unused processor power to the Mersenne algorithm, yet failed to find the next largest prime. As to why they do this? Well, I know a math major, and there's really no way to explain unless you've met a pure math major, and if you've met a pure math major, you don't need it explained.
     
  5. SpidermanTuba
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    SpidermanTuba BANNED

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    Actually prime numbers are extremely important in encryption algorithms.
     
  6. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    Being a BBQ enthusiast, the only prime I am interested in is rib.
     
  7. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    actually, the more primes we know of, the better....

    Since ST mentioned it, prime numbers are used for encryption.... I believe it has to do with the fact that you can generate semi-random numbers using prime numbers.

    There probably other uses for primes as well. I guess any application that needs random numbers generated could benefit from such discoveries.

    But I believe that the real reason for such exercises is in the field of computing. After all, how do you generate such a large number? My guess is that it involves a great deal of research into algorithms and computing techniques. These techniques may eventually find a practical use in the real world.

    Much of the technology today is based on mathematical discoveries made well over 100 years ago, when there was no practical use for them.

    Boolean Algebra, developed in the 19th century - now used in the design of computers and logic

    Fourier Transforms, developed in the 18th or 19th centuries - used in telecommunication

    LaPlace Transforms, developed in the 18th century - may also be used in communication, computing or both

    Topology, developed in the 19th or early 20th century - used in the study of String Theory

    The Pythagorean Theorem - discovered before the 10th century BC, used in just about every field imaginable
     
  8. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Karl, my father would love you! (He was a PhD mechanical engineer.)
     
  9. SpidermanTuba
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    SpidermanTuba BANNED

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    Dude Fourier transforms are probably the most useful mathematical tool ever developed. Green's functions are cool, too.
     
  10. KarlMarx
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    KarlMarx Senior Member

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    I remember that we used them a lot back when I was going to college for Electrical Engineering. I'm aware of their use in signal processing(i.e. Fourier Transforms, and more recently, Fast Fourier Transforms), and so on, but is there another use for them (keep in mind, I haven't been in college for 26 years)...

    I've heard of Green's functions, but what are they used for? I looked up Green's functions and it said they are almost like Fourier Transforms but for partial differential equations.
     

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