Japan's Political Lurch To The Right

Discussion in 'General Global Topics' started by bluesky79, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. bluesky79
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    bluesky79 Member

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    The election of right-wing Shinzo Abe in Japan will bring an increase in tensions in East Asia but reform for an ailing economy. The new prime minister is 58-year-old Shinzo Abe's election victory marks his return to Japan's highest office after he served as Japan's prime minister for exactly a year between September 2006 and September 2007. Domestically, the economy will be Mr Abe's biggest challenge.

    He has called for "unlimited" monetary easing - essentially the continuous printing of money. It is a controversial and high-risk strategy but analysts say it at least represents an effort to do something after years of indecision over the country's economy. Internationally, there is significant anxiety over the direction in which Mr Abe will take Japan's relations with China and with South Korea. Tokyo is locked in two separate maritime disputes, one with Seoul and the other with Beijing. The dispute with China is particularly tense with the two countries both claiming sovereignty over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands in the East China Sea. Mr Abe, a proud nationalist, has cast himself as the strong leader he says Japan needs to overcome its economic difficulties and to stand up to Chinese aggression.

    He has called for a change to Japan's pacifist constitution to allow its military to adopt a more offensive stance. His version of history will also cause some unease. He has openly said he doesn't believe that Japanese troops forced Chinese and Korean women into sexual slavery during World War Two despite evidence to the contrary.Mr Ishihara could be blamed for sparking the island dispute with China. His announcement in April that he would buy three of the islands from their private Japanese owners was seen as an overt attempt to irritate Beijing.

    The Japanese government's move to block Ishihara's purchase by nationalising the islands was designed to diffuse the tension with China, but it had the opposite effect. The election victory reflects a country that is more nationalist than it has been in decades.
     
  2. ThirdTerm
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    ThirdTerm Severely Conservative

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    It was a natural reversion to the LDP which had been the ruling party until the DPJ took power in 2009 and the DPJ showed ignorance in governance issues and it failed to live up to expectations with a series of foreign policy blunders and the country's brief experiment with the two-party system may have come to an end with the DPJ's implosion. Based on its nationalist platform, the DPJ demanded US troops' partial withdrawal from Japan with the closure of an American military base, which has made the Obama administration turn a cold shoulder to the DPJ leadership and encouraged China to take a provocative stance on the territorial issue and it's expected that the LDP can smooth things over with Washington. The US-Japan alliance has been the cornerstone of Japan's national defence in the volatile region to deter potential Chinese or Korean aggression, relying on roughly 50,000 American military personnel stationed in Japan without having a large standing army of its own and the Bush administration decided to cut 40% of US troops stationed in the Korean Peninsula after a series of violent anti-American protests in Korea but any reduction of the US military presence in Japan will inevitably lead to the country's remilitarisation to keep up with its hawkish neighbours.

     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2012
  3. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    Shall we beef up our defenses in Hawaii?
     

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