Iraqis call for five-man junta to end the anarchy

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Redhots, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. Redhots
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    Redhots Member

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    IRAQ’S fragile democracy, weakened by mounting chaos and a rapidly rising death toll, is being challenged by calls for the formation of a hardline “government of national salvation”.

    The proposal, which is being widely discussed in political and intelligence circles in Baghdad, is to replace the Shi’ite-led government of Nouri al-Maliki, the prime minister, with a regime capable of imposing order and confronting the sectarian militias leading the country to the brink of civil war. Dr Saleh al-Mutlak, a prominent Sunni politician, travelled to Arab capitals last week seeking support for the replacement of the present government with a group of five strongmen who would impose martial law and either dissolve parliament or halt its participation in day-to-day government.

    NI_MPU('middle');Other Iraqis dismissed the idea that a unilateral change in the leadership would be desirable or even possible. “The only person who can undertake a coup in Iraq now is General George Casey (the US commander) and I don’t think the Americans are inclined to go in that direction,” said Ahmed Chalabi, head of a rival political party.

    Any suspension of the democratic process would be regarded as a severe blow to American and British policy.

    The establishment of democracy has been its cornerstone and successful elections in December last year were hailed as a cause for optimism. However, Anthony Cordesman, an influential expert on Iraq at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said there was a “very real possibility” that Maliki could be toppled in the coming months.

    “Nobody in Iraq has the military power to mount a traditional coup, but there could be a change in government, done in a backroom, which could see a general brought in to run the ministry of defence or the interior,” Cordesman said.

    “It could be regarded as a more legitimate government than the present one as long it doesn’t favour one faction.”

    This weekend Mutlak, who leads the Iraqi National Dialogue Front, the fifth largest political group in the national assembly, vowed to press ahead with his plans.. “We think Iraq is now in a tragic state,” he said.

    “Maliki must step down. He has done nothing up to now. Hundreds of Iraqis are being killed almost daily and thousands are being removed from their homes in sectarian purges, and he takes no action.”

    The main focus of a new regime, Mutlak said, would be to bring security back to Iraq by “cleaning out” the ministries of defence and the interior, widely seen as having been infiltrated by sectarian militias. He said he had the support of four other parties including al-Fadila, a Shi’ite party based in Basra.

    Mutlak’s proposal is evidence of increasing frustration with Maliki who has failed to stop violence and to revive the economy.

    Last week Iraqi officials estimated that up to 100 people, mostly civilians, were being murdered every day.

    Yesterday’s grim reports included the discovery of seven headless bodies north of Baghdad. They were among 17 Shi’ite construction workers kidnapped last Thursday, apparently in retaliation for the burning of three Sunnis the previous day.

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/newspaper/0,,176-2404311,00.html
     
  2. Redhots
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    Redhots Member

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    Why not just bring Saddam back already?
     
  3. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Depends on what method this new group uses to restore order. If they can reduce they number of Iraqi on Iraqi murder it may be a postive step in Iraqi self determination and more elections could be held later after some semblance of law and order can be maintained. I don't think they are suggesting mass killings as a way of keeping the country stable.
     
  4. trobinett
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    trobinett Senior Member

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    Not good.

    No matter how its looked at, this is a step backward. Maybe we were a little early in hoping for a democracy.

    I'm saddened with this possibility, but like many things in the "real world", this may have to happen.:dunno:
     
  5. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    The US went through a Civil War MUCH worse than what Iraq. It may work out better than we think.
     
  6. Dr Grump
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    Dr Grump Gold Member

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    Understatement of the year....
     
  7. glockmail
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    glockmail BANNED

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    I'll give you the benefit of doubt and assume that you are not serious.

    This is a religious civil war that will never end. The only way to deal with these factions is to separate them geographically with defensible borders. Iraq should be split up into three states, Sunni, Shia and Kurd, along with a weak federal entity that does little else but distributes oil money. I've said this a long time ago and the problem will never be solved until this is done.
     
  8. trobinett
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    trobinett Senior Member

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    Good point dilloduck, guest I was a little "down", and not looking at it in a positive manner.:slap:

    Glockmail posts:

    Kinda flys in the face of bringing unity to the region, but maybe you've got a point, or three.

    The next few years will certainly be interesting, can I have an AMEN?:bow3:
     
  9. glockmail
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    I don't think unity has ever been the goal. It shouldn't be for the US. All we care about over there is stability. Iraq was created out of thin air after WW2, and it was a big mistake by the bureaucrats who did it.

    And yes, amen. Far too interesting. Give me boring any day.
     

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