How About A Rep For President Obama!

Discussion in 'Education' started by PoliticalChic, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Nothing is all good or all bad.

    This from an article in The New Republic about the benefits to American education as a result of intitiatives by the Obama Administration.

    "Obama is well on his way to becoming an Education President in the true sense. No, all of America’s public schools will not be turning into lushly funded academies churning out bright-eyed, civicly-engaged, readaholic yet well-rounded Übercitizens anytime soon, if ever. But great stuff is happening.

    Take, for example, the National Center on Education and the Economy’s plan to have eight states experiment with allowing public school students to graduate after tenth grade upon finishing clearly stated requirements, and to then go on to community college. The states will have pilot schools using this program just two autumns from now.

    Clearly having to give a tenth-grade education so much more bang for the buck will require better teaching than the average American public school student gets today. As it happens, this dovetails nicely with the growing clout that improving teacher assessment has gained over the past year in education circles.

    For one, Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s Race to the Top program includes funds for teacher assessment. And then, right on time, American Federation of Teachers head Randi Weingarten has actually openly come out in favor of stressing teacher assessment.

    Race to the Top is an attempt to get at these problems – handiest is going from NLCB’s “if you don’t improve, you might get shut down” to RTTT’s “if you don’t improve you don’t get any extra money.” If providing a carrot along with the stick is considered common wisdom on Iran, surely the argument applies to schools."
    Community Colleges Are More Interesting Than Tea Parties | The New Republic
     

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