Gun Violence: America's Secret Health Crisis

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by Ravi, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. Ravi

    Ravi Diamond Member

    Feb 27, 2008
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    • Children age 5 to 14 living in states with high rates of gun ownership and weak gun laws were more likely to die in homicides, suicides or accidental shootings in their home, according to a 2002 study. In the five states with the highest rates of gun ownership, kids were 3.3 times more likely to die in a gun homicide, 6.7 times more likely to die in a gun suicide and 16 times more likely to die of an unintended gunshot, compared with kids in the five states with the lowest rates of gun ownership.

    • Firearm homicide rates in the U.S. in 2003 were 20 times greater than in 22 other high-income countries, according to a study published last year. Among 15-to-24-year-olds, the homicide-by-gun rate was 43 times greater. While the other countries had a total population of 564 million compared with 291 million in the U.S., 80 percent of gun deaths occurred here.

    • A 1997 study looking at the largely employed members of a health maintenance organization around Seattle found that if anyone in a family had purchased a gun, the odds of a homicide occurring in their home were twice as high as in the homes of health-plan members of the same age, sex and neighborhood who hadn’t bought guns.

    • In homes where a gun was kept, there was a 2.7 times greater risk of a homicide taking place compared to homes without guns, according to a 1993 study conducted in the counties including Memphis, Seattle and Cleveland.

    Gun Violence: America's Secret Health Crisis - Forbes

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