Getting rid of Somali pirates through international cooperation

Discussion in 'Africa' started by xomputer, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. xomputer
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    xomputer BANNED

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    The Puntland state of Somalia, located in Northeastern Somalia, made an official announcement thanking the South Korean Chung-hae unit for its raid on Somali pirates.
    Puntland state officials argued that military action against Somali pirates is the best option they have in getting rid of Somali pirates and asked the international community to aid them in undertaking anit-piracy operations.

    There are around 30 military vessels from dozens of countries that are operating near the Gulf of Aden to protect commercial vessels from Somali pirate raids.
    However, as the Samho Jewelry hijacking clearly shows, the current system is inadequate.
    Using the South Korean Chung-hae unit's successful rescue operation as a turning point, the international community should bloster its cooperation in its anti-piracy effort.
     
  2. LAfrique
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    LAfrique VIP Member

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    And I beg to differ! Those Somali "pirates" are simply vigilantes looking out for the well-being of their nation: Somali piracy is in fact the efforts of Somalis to help deter illegal dumping, fishing and pollution.

    It is no secret that the US and several European nations prefer to dump their toxic wastes that they would not bury in their own nations in or around developing nations. Coastal nations, especially those in Africa, are used to and tied of finding toxic wastes illegally dumped by ships washed up on their shores. And since neither the suspect flag ship nation nor international community would pay attention to these little guys, they eventually resorted to fighting back for themselves and forcefully implementing International laws of the seas.

    International laws give coastal nations the right to claim certain portions of the high seas as their territory and to prevent violators whose acts threaten their resources or ecosystem. These laws, like several International Conventions, are based on a Precautionary Principle: Driven by a Self-Defense doctrine, the International Protective Principle and the Precautionary Principle give coastal nations not only the power, but the obligation to take affirmative actions to prevent people from degrading world marine resources.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011

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