Friends in the Mountains

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Lefty Wilbury, Oct 10, 2005.

  1. Lefty Wilbury
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    Lefty Wilbury Active Member

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    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9629606/site/newsweek/

    Friends in the Mountains
    Northern Iraq is a stable land where people love America and Americans. So why doesn't the U.S. military make itself at home?

    By Babak Dehghanpisheh and Christopher Dickey
    Newsweek

    Oct. 17, 2005 issue - For a brief spell last year, small groups of American soldiers fresh off the battlefields of Fallujah and Samarra got a chance to rest and relax at the Jiyan Hotel in the highlands of Iraq. They could swim laps, play tennis, shoot pool and generally just chill as they looked out on the dramatic snow-covered peaks that have always been the refuge of the Kurds. ("We have no friends but the mountains" is a well-known Kurdish proverb.) Kids mobbed the soldiers, asking for candy; adults began every conversation with "My friend." Indeed, there are few places anywhere in the world these days where American troops get a warmer welcome.

    When you hear that Iraqis are sick of the U.S. occupation, remember the Kurds. They love the U.S.A. They want these American occupiers, and really do think of them as liberators. Top Kurdish officials have practically begged the U.S. military to make itself at home in their land. "I do not ask that Americans build bases in Kurdistan—I demand it," says Abdel Beg Perwani, a Kurdish member of Iraq's Parliament and deputy head of the defense committee.

    It gets better: Kurdistan is the one area of Iraq that's stable and prosperous. "People feel good," says Stafford Clarry, an adviser to the regional government who previously worked for the United Nations. "It's just money, money, money." With the approach of a referendum on Iraq's national constitution on Oct. 15, bombs were going off to the south in Baghdad, Taji and Al Hillah, killing scores of people and wounding hundreds. But the Kurds were in a festive mood. "It's going to be embarrassing," says Clarry of the referendum. In Kurdistan, "there's probably going to be a 97 percent turnout."

    So why are U.S. soldiers rare sights in the Kurdish north? In part, it's because they're not needed. Kurdish troops known as peshmerga are responsible for keeping order, and do. Yet soldiers don't even go to the Jiyan Hotel anymore for R&R; they go to Kuwait and Qatar instead. And you might think the Americans could use a base in a stable area, if only to focus a little attention there. So what gives? The answer goes a long way toward explaining the delicacy of the U.S. position. America can't afford to accept the offers of its friends in Iraq any more than it can bow to the demands of its enemies—at least not yet.

    Very quietly, some tentative planning for American installations in Kurdistan is underway. One site under consideration is the military zone that houses Erbil International Airport. According to the civilian facility's general director, Zaid Zwain, a "large team" from the American military "came to do a security assessment" last April. Harry Schute, who was in charge of an Army civil-affairs unit in northern Iraq until June last year, says that Kurdish leaders have also offered basing facilities at the old Harir air base north of Erbil. "You have a spot that's —right in the thick of things, but that spot is secure and the people are friendly," says Schute. A senior Coalition official, who would speak only on condition that he not be further identified, says the planning is part of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's global strategy to build small, forward bases and to support "islands of stability" in potentially troubled regions.

    The Kurds' proffered hospitality is not altruistic. They have a long history of being massacred by their neighbors and betrayed by their friends (including the United States). Since 1991, however, the Americans have provided fairly consistent protection, and the Kurds have developed their economy and their fledgling democracy. Since the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, many have dared to dream of an even closer alliance that would serve to protect them further.

    That's probably more of a commitment than the United States wants to make at this point. For starters, it would further anger and alienate the Shiite and Sunni Arabs of Iraq, and imperil any hopes of building an effective national government. Iraq's neighbors would be equally wary. Iran wouldn't look kindly on U.S. bases anywhere on its borders, and already has concerns about unrest stirred among its Kurds by the satellite TV stations broadcasting from northern Iraq. Turkey, itself a close U.S. ally, has opposed every increment in Iraqi Kurdish autonomy, fearing Kurds in Turkey would make the same demands.

    Iraq's Kurds are not relying solely on the U.S. for their security. Since the fall of Saddam, more than $800 million worth of construction contracts have been given out to Turkish companies. Yet tens of thousands of Turkish troops remain positioned near the border, and Ankara continues to press Washington to do something about Kurdish rebels operating from northern Iraq. So far, the U.S. military has shied away from that. But the United States may have to act if it wants to get Ankara's blessing to build bases in Turkey's backyard.

    As Kurdistan cultivates its image of tranquillity, launching a TV ad campaign next month beckoning investors to "Kurdistan, the Other Iraq," the temptation for the American military is bound to grow. "If you think about a withdrawal strategy, it would make a lot of sense," says Peter Galbraith, a former American ambassador who advises the Kurdish leadership. U.S. forces could still deploy quickly and effectively from Kurdish areas, but wouldn't be an in-your-face incitement to resentful Sunni or Shiite Arabs. And they'd be staying the course, still inside the country. "If you get out of Iraq completely," says Galbraith, "you'll never go back." Until then, it seems, the United States has no better friends than the Kurds in their mountains.
     
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  2. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    Nice article
     
  3. Gunny
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    Gunny Gold Member

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    LMAO .... yeah, NO bias here .....
     
  4. Stephanie
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    Stephanie Diamond Member Supporting Member

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    Nice to read something good about Iraq, and our military....Thank's
     
  5. USMCDevilDog
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    USMCDevilDog Member

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    Damn straight! I like the Kurds now :)
     
  6. Hagbard Celine
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    Hagbard Celine Senior Member

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    You didn't like them before? They've been our allies in the northern oil fields for over a decade.
     
  7. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    It is quite a good article. It portrays the difficult decisions we have to make in regards to Iraq and the broader Middle East, while offering a compelling vision for the future at the end for the American presence.

    Obviously, a VERY RARE gem from Newsweek.

    The Kurds are the Arab Israelis.
     
  8. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Yes, I think the Kurds love a free society as much as the Israelis do, and they have proven that democracy can work in the Middle East if given a fair chance.
     
  9. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    If we can avoid making the same mistakes that the English and the French made when they attempted to divide this area up amongst themselves, pehaps the Kurds will remain our friends.
     
  10. ekrem
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    ekrem VIP Member

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    I have read the article and read your comments and posts...


    In accordance to your yuhu-happy coments i am not going to post facts that crushes your "views" of democratic Kurds.

    Therefore i will only write about security-policies.




    It is only Turkish link, but it relies on MIT (Turkish-Intelligence) sources....
    http://www.tempodergisi.com.tr/toplum_politika/09069/


    It says, that to PKK-Terrorists there have been given Kurdistan-Passes.
    Last days a top PKK-Terrorists wanted to pass German boarders to Germany with this passport and was rejected, because Kurdistan-Passes aren't accepted by Germans.
    These passes are given to Terrorists to ease international movement...
    And sickering in to Turkey.



    Look here: this was Months ago, were Terrorists demanded passports from Barzani
    http://www.zaman.com/?hn=24246&bl=national

    Now he cooperates with Terrorists, which is nothin new.



    So: what to do now?
    Should Turkey shut boarders with Iraq or let boarders open for a regional government which supports Terrorists?


    When Turkey shuts boarders, who is going to suplly American soldiers in Iraq?

    Questions over questions.


    Yesterday turkish newspapers reported that George Bush invited Barzani to Washington after referendum.

    So what should turkey think USA inviting Tribal leaders of family-clans to Washington, which support Terrorists and give them passports?
     

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