Even More Political Correctness Madness From Across The Pond

Discussion in 'Europe' started by GotZoom, Jun 7, 2006.

  1. GotZoom
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    GotZoom Senior Member

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    :bang3: :bang3: :bang3: :bang3:

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    A school has changed the names of its primary one classes after complaints that they left some children feeling inferior, BBC Scotland has learned.

    Bonnyrigg Primary School had called its classes 1a and 1b but some parents of children in 1b said it left the youngsters feeling second best.

    The classes will now be known as 1ar and 1ap, incorporating teachers' surnames in the new titles.

    One Midlothian parent dubbed the move "political correctness gone mad".

    The man said he was surprised when he read about the change in a school newsletter.

    He told the BBC Scotland news website: "This shows how far political correctness has gone in Scotland.

    "I thought this policy was simply astounding. I have to admit that I am surprised that the headmistress has bowed to, and thereby endorsed, this."

    Eleanor Coner, Scottish Parent Teacher Council information officer, said she was "flabbergasted" by the school's decision to rename its classes.

    She said: "There is a long history of giving classes names and therefore it seems logical to go with the start of the alphabet.

    I think these parents need to get a grip, it's a ridiculous request, which has left me flabbergasted

    "These parents need not be so sensitive and should think whether it is not their actions which are highlighting this inferior idea surrounding class names.

    "It all sounds a bit silly to me and is on a par with the situation which brought us the changed nursery rhyme name of Ba Ba Rainbow Sheep.

    "I think these parents need to get a grip, it's a ridiculous request, which has left me flabbergasted."

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/edinburgh_and_east/5040970.stm

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    BARMY Radio 1 has banned World Cup songs that mention England - in case they upset Welsh, Scots or Irish listeners.

    Bands who use the E word will get the red card from the station's all-important playlist.

    A Radio 1 source said: "We have been told songs that contain the word England repeatedly can't be put on the playlist because we don't want to upset anyone who isn't English. It's ridiculous."

    The ruling comes despite the fact that Breakfast Show host Chris Moyles. left, will be broadcasting live from Germany throughout the World Cup. The source said: "Chris Moyles and his team will be really cranking it up for the World Cup. It just shows how hypocritical this ruling is."

    England's official World Cup theme, World At Your Feet by rockers Embrace, sidesteps the ban because it does not mention England.

    But We Are England by indie band Ricky is off the playlist despite outselling the Embrace anthem. Ricky's singer Jim Lines, 26, said: "It's a shame if you can't support your team."

    Radio 1 said: "Obviously, we have to be aware we have a national audience. But the main factor in deciding to playlist a song is musical merit."

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/tm_obj...eid=94762&headline=radio-ga-ga-name_page.html

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    There might be hope - it looks like the BBC is coming around:

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    THE word “gay” now means “rubbish” in modern playground-speak and need not be offensive to homosexuals, the BBC Board of Governors has ruled.

    A listener complained after Chris Moyles dismissed a ringtone by saying on his Radio 1 breakfast show: “I don’t want that one, it’s gay.”

    The complainant argued that the use of the word gay in this context was homophobic. The governors said, however, that Moyles was simply keeping up with developments in English usage.

    The programme complaints committee noted: “The word ‘gay’, in addition to being used to mean ‘homosexual’ or ‘carefree’, was often now used to mean ‘lame’ or ‘rubbish’. This is a widespread current usage of the word amongst young people.”

    The committee, which consists of five BBC governors, including the former Royal Ballet dancer Deborah Bull, was “familiar with hearing this word in this context”.

    Given Moyles’s target audience of young listeners “it was to be expected that he would use expressions and words which the listeners used themselves”.

    The governors believed that, in describing a ringtone as gay, the DJ was conveying that he thought it was “rubbish” rather than “homosexual”. Moyles was not being homophobic, they said.

    The panel acknowledged, however, that this use of the word “gay” in a derogatory sense could cause offence to some listeners and counselled caution on its use. Radio 1 was, however, correct to cancel future interviews with the American rap star Jayceon Taylor — known as The Game — after he called gay men “faggots” during a live interview. The presenter Jo Whiley showed “courage and presence of mind” by making an instant full apology, the panel ruled.

    The governors also cleared The Catherine Tate Show over a complaint that an effeminate character in the sketch show was offensive. The humour derives from Derek Faye’s outraged reaction at the widespread assumption that he is gay. The complainant took offence that the viewers were invited to laugh at the character’s obvious gayness.

    The committee said that the series was dominated by extreme, ridiculous characters who were “not meant to be taken literally or too seriously”. The BBC Two audience would not have found the sketches offensive.

    However, BBC commentators should have apologised promptly to viewers after an outburst of swearing from Tim Henman during a Wimbledon match at teatime against the Russian Dmitry Tursunov.

    The committee noted that, of four possible instances of offensive language during the match, two were impossible to decipher and may not have been swear words; one was a clear use of the “f” word, and the other a use of the word “arse”.

    Given Henman’s previous good character, the committee agreed that there had been no reason to suppose beforehand that the British tennis player would have used any offensive language during a live broadcast.

    A complainant had accused the BBC of a “serious disregard for broadcasting rules and regulations”, but the corporation’s committee said that viewers would not want pre-watershed sport to be subject to a time delay, despite the occasional risk of foul language.


    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2212170,00.html
     
  2. dmp
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    dmp Senior Member

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    This world won't last long. Stupid people are growing in number and conservatives' numbers are reducing it seems.

    :(
     
  3. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Did the kids tell their parents they felt "second best," or did the parents tell the kids that the kids felt "second best"?
     
  4. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    I remember that and was always relieved not to be in the "D" classs, cause D is for Duh-dumb. :laugh:
     
  5. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    agreed--and doing nothing but complaining. Bitching changes nothing. Calling your rep may as well be a call to Mars.
     

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