education , teaching ?

Discussion in 'Education' started by sam111, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. sam111
    Offline

    sam111 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    73
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +1
    I am curious who is responsible for creating the tests for elementary/grammer school, middle school , high school, and college level?

    Basically GED , SAT/PSAT , GRE / GMAT / LSAT / MCAT ....etc
    Are these done from a group of organization or just one.
    Who is responsible for what questions will be on the test and what content will be covered on the test?

    Question 2
    As for other types of test like certification tests like building , or computer , or medical , or engineering.

    Are their specific people that make up the questions for those tests. Or is it an organization or a specialist in the field ....?

    How would one get the responsibility or job of doing this if he wanted to and had the knowledge?

    If one was a teacher for many years and wanted to get into creating tests and certification exams what would one have to do to get in charge of creating the exams.
    Assuming he has the proper knowledge in the area under consideration .
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  2. editec
    Offline

    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    41,427
    Thanks Received:
    5,598
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +5,618
    Google is your friend


     
  3. sam111
    Offline

    sam111 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    73
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +1
    ok, I was also curious if I wanted to home school my child.
    Would all he have to do to get him into a great college is score high on the SAT test. And do well on a GED test?

    Is the sat , and ged the only test need to pass/graduate high school from home.

    In theory I am going to prepare him better then most of the local schools could around here. Just was concerned of the process involved in getting him into collage ... since he will technically have no highschool transcripts or any school transcripts for that matter.

    Only the grades on the tests he needs to take to show the college or is their more stuff we have to do.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  4. RebeccaAGray_85
    Offline

    RebeccaAGray_85 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1
    It is hard to say. There are many different types on homeschooling. Ideally, he would earn his GED and make good scores on the ACT and/or SAT to be set up to go to a good college. However, some schools are more strict and indecisive with home schooled students. You would have to look into which colleges care and which ones don't.
     
  5. uscitizen
    Offline

    uscitizen Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    45,941
    Thanks Received:
    4,791
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    My Shack
    Ratings:
    +4,807
    I was told by a reputable source that those tests were generated on Gama Theta7.
     
  6. WorldWatcher
    Offline

    WorldWatcher Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,971
    Thanks Received:
    1,275
    Trophy Points:
    200
    Location:
    VA
    Ratings:
    +1,905

    You should check your States Department of Education website for it's homeschooling section and probably inquire with the local school system.

    Different States may have different requirements regarding homeschooling. For example the link below a parent information handbook for homeschooling.


    For example:

    "The Code of Virginia reads as follows at § 22.1-254.1.B:
    Any parent who elects to provide home instruction in lieu of school attendance shall annually notify the division superintendent in August of his intention to so instruct the child and provide a description of the curriculum to be followed for the coming year…."

    and another...

    "To comply with § 22.1-254.1 of the Va. Code, the parent is required to submit, by the following August 1, evidence of the child's academic achievement in one of the following ways:
    1. Evidence that the child has attained a composite score in or above the fourth stanine on any nationally normed standardized achievement test; or
    2. An evaluation or assessment which the school division superintendent determines to indicate that the child is achieving an adequate level of educational growth and progress.​
    "​


    So even though you homeschool, there may be certain elements of state law that you have to comply with such as curriculum submissions, participation in some type of testing program to show proficiency at various points and on certain subjects (even well before the GED, SAT, type of end of school testing).



    http://www.doe.virginia.gov/student...ome_instruction/home_instruction_handbook.pdf


    >>>>
     
  7. sam111
    Offline

    sam111 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    73
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +1
    Thank, you I guess the best way is to read the state and town laws where you live and talk to the States Department of Education.

    Question
    Assuming I read thru understand, and follow the laws, follow the education department rules. And they approve of the progress and say I am doing well.

    The I am only concerned about weather he would have to do anything else other then passing the SAT / GED tests. To get into a good college like Princeton , mit ,...etc.

    Basically is their anything else he or I would have to do other then comply with the board of eduation, have him score very well on the sat and ged test.
    To get into a good college like Princeton , MIT , Berkeley ,...etc

    Or are their any other requirements that could put my child at a disadvantage even if he has above and beyond the knowledge of the regular child in applying to top colleges/universities ?
     
  8. rdean
    Online

    rdean rddean

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    60,211
    Thanks Received:
    6,905
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    chicago
    Ratings:
    +15,050
    They are created by "elitists". Ask the Republicans.
     
  9. sam111
    Offline

    sam111 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    73
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +1
    Well, you kind of didn't answer my question.

    Assuming my child is smarter and scores higher on the SAT / GED or any other board of education thing they may throw at me.

    Would their be any disadvantage in him get into a school like MIT or Princeton over somebody that was not home schooled. (apart from politics or people knowing people)

    Would they take somebody with a little lower score that went to school as opposed to somebody that scored higher and was home schooled ?

    Basically when he is at the point of sending in his application to MIT , PRINCETON , or other colleges/universities that he wants to potentially go to.

    What would they be focused on his grades , weather he actively participated in the community , played sports , voluntaries in working at a company for the summer.

    I am just curious what they are really looking for apart from the smartest , most motivated student , nice/kind person, responsible person.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
  10. WorldWatcher
    Offline

    WorldWatcher Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,971
    Thanks Received:
    1,275
    Trophy Points:
    200
    Location:
    VA
    Ratings:
    +1,905
    Question (Not trying to get personal, but the answers have an influence on timeline and things that you can do):

    1. Do you have children now or are you looking to the future?

    2. If you have children how many and how old?

    3. Are you in a two parent family and can at least one of you invest the time required to properly homeschool?​

    Suggestion:
    1. In addition to the State DOE and local district check for local groups for active homeschoolers (the local school district should know who they are) and you may also want to check with local religious organizations which will often provide assistance to homeschooling groups.

    2. Contact colleges and universities within driving distance to your home. Either by phone or by personal appointment visit their admissions office for some research on the college application process.

    3. Secondly, do some research on the qualify of education in your area and schools that offer a rigorous academic program, their admission rates, the number and types of advanced placement classes/programs, etc. If you live in an area where the schools are not that great, would it be possible to move to an area where the schools are much better. ​

    Please don’t take this the wrong way, but if you have children and they are older, say high school age – if you are thinking about switching them to homeschool, it’s probably a bad idea.

    If you have very young children and have the academic aptitude to homeschool and the resources then homeschooling can be a much better idea.

    **************************************

    I currently have a Son who is a senior in college and a daughter who is a Junior, so we went through the whole application process not that long ago. Our daughter was very competitive for any school in the country with excellent SAT scores, selection for National, Music, Math, and Spanish Honor Societies, Marching Band, 4-H Community Service, and volunteer teen counselor at a local youth camp over multiple summers.

    The impression I’m getting is that you are way to focused on SAT scores as a prerequisite for college. They are important but they are only one aspect of the package.

    Colleges like Princeton, MIT, Cornell, Stanford, etc – are interested in the whole student not just a single test score. They are looking for things like:
    1. Rigorous academic challenge
    2. Community involvement
    3. Community service
    4. Diverse interests to augment the academics

    Academics can be difficult for homeschoolers to document. It takes a lot of work to develop the documentation and participation in homeschool testing programs that verify achievement.

    Community involvement and service include are things outside of academics. Strong church program participation, Boy/Girl Scouts, etc.

    **************************************

    I wouldn’t say homeschooling is a disadvantage, but the reality is that top schools get way more applications then they have room for. Taking Princeton as an example, in 2011 they had 27,189 applicants and only 2,282 were selected – that’s 8.39%. Selection is tough.

    Of the admits, the following statistics apply to they secondary education:
    Pubic School 58%
    Independent Day 20%
    Independent Boarding 8.6%
    Religious Affiliated 12.6%
    Home Schooled 0.6%
    Military School 0.2%


    Princeton University - Princeton makes offers to 8.39 percent of applicants in record admission cycle
    Princeton University | Admission Statistics

    >>>>
     

Share This Page