Do Violent Video Games Create Over Aggressive People?

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by BrianH, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    I've been reading about video games and it's effects on young children and teenagers. The ongoing study of experts shows that violent video games contribute to more aggressive people.

    Studies have found that children who play violent video games:

    -See the world as a more hostil place.
    -Argue with teachers more frequently.
    -Are more likely to be involved in physical fights.
    -Do not perform as well in school.

    The author's opinion revolves around the type of "play" that video games provides.

    His view:

    "Today's video games offer a completely different type of play than my generation engaged in as kids. When I was little and playing cops and robbers, I said, "Bang, bang, I got you, Jimmy." Jimmy said, "No you didn't." So I said, "Well, bang, bang. Now I got you." Again he argued that I didn't. So, I smacked him with my cap gun, and after he went crying to his mother and I got in big trouble. ALong the way I learned one of life's most important lessons, a lesson that usually had to be taught over and over again: Jimmy is real, Sally is real, and Fido is real, and if I hurt them, I'm going to get into big trouble.
    For thousands of years kids have whacked each other with wooden swords, or played "bang,bang, I got you." This was healthy play because as soon as someone got hurt the play stopped, and all the kids gathered around and tried to convince him not to tell momma. Today, kids are immersed in a virtual reality environment where they repeatedly blow their virtual, hyperrealistic, playmate's heads off in explosions of blood and gore. Do they get in trouble? No. They get awarded points! This is pathological and dysfunctional play." (Lt. Colonel Dave Grossman; On Combat)
     
  2. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    Maybe being a violent child causes one to play violent video games?
     
  3. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    Could be...he says alot of children come from depressing backgrounds and emerse themselves in hyperreality where they have alot of power. I would agree that there are reasons for kids getting involved in violent video games.

    But there's also enough evidence to show that there are just as many well-rounded kids that come from normal backgrounds that play violent video games...and are just as aggressive.

    Alot of if depends on the actual person. But if you believe in classical conditioning, his statments are true.

    Many of us over the age of 20 didn't start out with high quality video games. So we know the value of "healthy play" more than kids today. Sure we had Atari and Nintendo, but games didn't start getting really bloody and violent until the 90s.

    younger kids today start out at kindergarten with realistic gaming.
     
  4. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    Don't get me wrong...I'm not saying that video gaming is all bad. I love playing first-person shooters...but I've had enough healthy play as a child to know that what I'm playing isn't real and you do the things you do in video game out on the streets...cause you'll be arrested or die.
     
  5. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    It's an interesting question but I don't think we are capable of answering it at the moment. The guy's reasoning was pure speculation.

    Once upon a time kids didn't really play once they got past toddlerhood, they worked. As the middle class grew, more and more kids had leisure time to play. Still do, even though play is different. Has the level of violence changed because of video games or because kids aren't put into the work house to keep them out of mischief? Are kids so pressured to excel in school that they act out in protest with violence? So many factors could contribute.

    And is the level of violence different now than it was twenty, thirty, forty years ago?
     
  6. Shogun
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    Shogun Free: Mudholes Stomped

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    My answer is no.

    I'll let you ask why.
     
  7. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    The level of crimes may not have changed, but the level of violent crimes by youth have increased. You have more school shootings than before. You have more young kids killing their parents for easily solvable reasons.

    Agreed, many factors could contribute, but we're talking about violent video games specifically.

    Shogun,

    Feel free to input, but as much as you you'll think you're right...you're not smarter than 20 years experience in human aggression and psychology.
     
  8. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    In 2000, the American Medical Association (AMA), American Psychological Association (APA), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of CHild and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) made a joint statement to Congress.

    "Well over 1,000 studies point overwhelmingly to a casual connection between media violence and agressive behavior in some children. Preliminary studies indicate that the negative impact of interactive electronic media [violent video games] may be significantly more severe than that wrought by television, movies, or music."

    In 2001, the National Institute for Media and the Family realeased their research on 600 8th and 9th graders. They concluded:

    "...children who are least aggressive in nature but are exposed to violent video games, are more likely to get into fights than children who are very aggressive but do not play violent video games."
     
  9. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    Brian, do you have a link to that joint statement to Congress?
     
  10. BrianH
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    BrianH Senior Member

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    We do what we are trained (conditioned) to do. Whether it's informal or formal training. Studies show that many school shooters wanted to kill just one person...usually a teacher, girlfriend, enemy, but ended up killing more because after that first shot, they shot at whatever popped up next.

    Michael Carneal in Kentucky fired into a prayer circle inf ront of his school. His first bullet found itself between his girlfriend's eyes. Then he kept pulling the trigger. His own sister was in the group that he was firing at. After she ran forward a little to get him to stop, she realized that he didn't even notice she was there. She testified that he was going to kill her too, and she fled.

    Upon interview, Carneal had been an avid violent video game player. Dyllan and Klebold were also avid violent game players. Many school shootings have been linked to violent video games.

    THere is also a direct corrolation between firearm marksmanship and shooter games. 14-year-old Michael Carneal fired 8 shots and made 8 hits on 8 different people. 5 hits were head shots and the other three were upper torso. There is still no recorded comparison to this in military or law enforcement records. This was achieved by a boy who had never fired a pistol in real life, but only one day before put two clips of ammunition through a handgun that he stole.

    Military recruits who have had violent video game experience have been proved to shoot better than those who have not, even if they have never fired a gun.

    "The mother of a 13-year-old killer in the Jonesboro school shooting sat across our coffee table and told my wife and I, several months after the killings, that she finally told her son who he hadkilled that day. She said her boy laid his head on the table, and sobbed, saying, 'Those were my friends.'"


    The military uses video game simulations to train their soldiers. It works on children too.
     

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