Death with Dignity

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by Luissa, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    In my state this election we are voting on the Death with Dignity Act I 1000. This is physician assisted suicide and it is pretty much the same thing they have in Oregon. Working at a home for demensia and alzheimer's patients I think I am for this and watching my Grandmother slowly die from cancer at
    84. I have not completly made up my mind and I am wondering how some of you feel about this. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2008259886_oregonlaw13m0.html
     
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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  2. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    we dont let our animals suffer needlessly...why make humans?

    but with that said, my mother has a living will that wishes for me to starve her if she is in bad shape...i told her i would not do it.
     
  3. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    I did end of life care for over a year and you don't want to feed the people near the end or give them water. Having to digest food is very painful for them and dehyrdration is a natural way of pain managment. I get what you saying though, I wouldn't be able to do that which is why hospice is such a good program. I have witnessed many people dying slowly and it is the worst thing you could ever see in your life!
     
  4. mattskramer
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    mattskramer Senior Member

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    I fully support this measure. Making sure that he is of sound mind, let the person decide how and when he wants to die.
     
  5. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    I think I pretty much support it, I just don't want to vote for something I don't know everything about it especially when it comes to this sort of thing.

    The funny part is Martin Sheen is doing commericials against it in the state!
     
  6. jillian
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    jillian Princess Supporting Member

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    we're kinder to our pets than to our people sometimes. i think, under controlled conditions and with safeguards it's a good thing.
     
  7. CA95380
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    I agree with the above, plus this has to be something like the "living will". It would have to be preplanned, well in advance, when you are in sound mind, and body. Witnessed, in writing by others, long before it is needed.

    IMO the most cruel thing to watch is a loved one dying of cancer, or whatever, knowing that it is only a matter of time - and they are only receiving a morphine drip to control pain, and IV solution only to keep the vain open to receive the pain medication, not even aware that anyone is there with them. To me that is very inhumane for both patient and family.

    Here is something you might want to read on hospice.
    Hospice Care for the Dying - Is It Humane?
     
  8. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    Where I worked you could not have IV's so therefore they had to give them morphine by the mouth so therefore they didn't need to be hydrated which prolongs the death process. We worked with hospice but we did most of the care for the patient. We put lavender lotion on them every few hours and had peaceful music playing. Also besides recieving morphine they recieved such things as atavan to calm them also.
    Of course where I used to work is rated number one in the country for memory care and high for end of life care!
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  9. xsited1
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    xsited1 Agent P

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    This is a State's rights issue. If the people say they want it, the Federal government should not intervene. Good luck with your decision.
     
  10. CA95380
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    Luissa .... this stuck me personally, as you know. We, at our age have seen both, (my husband and myself), of our parents die as we sat at their bedside. There are different ways of dying ... watching a child die at a young age is very different, than watching an aged person that has led a full life, totally different, when we knew he would never get better.

    If our son had a "choice" we know what his choice would have been, because he told us well in advance, but there was nothing that would allow his wishes to be carried out. What he received was the very minimum that California allows, by law. The steps that you mentioned were done, by hospital/hospice staff and family. I know that he did not want us to go though what we did, for several days.

    When he took his very last breath, it was as if time stood still, the silence in the room, was something that I pray none of you have to face, (and if you have I sincerely understand what you went through). We summoned the nurse. After about fifteen minutes she told us his heart had stopped ... it still was very painful to witness.
     
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