Crossborder Conflict - The Devils Lake Diversion

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Isaac Brock, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Isaac Brock
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    Isaac Brock Active Member

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    From Canoe.ca (Canadian Press)
    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2005/05/05/1027474-cp.html

    EDIT: More links for interest

    The Canadian Government's Position

    Technical Study

    1909 Boundary Waters Treaty

    An American Article published by the Star Tribune
     
  2. Isaac Brock
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    Isaac Brock Active Member

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    I think for my province this is one of the largest concerns on the table. Right now, much talk has been on the nutrient/algal pollution in Lake Winnipeg (used for fishing and huge recreation industry). The arrival of the Devils Lake Diversion project (DLDP) has really incensed folks north of the borded as it essentially makes our waterways the dump for saline, nutrient loaded water, but more importantly a dump for escaping foreign biota.

    The planning of the DLDP was unilateral with few if no cross-border consultations to the effect of the local ecosystem and hydrology of the Sheyenne River let alone the Canadian hydrological basin. If it is pushed forward, it could have the potential to irrevocably harm Manitoba-North Dakota relations, which even given the current political climate had been very high.

    Solutions?
    A comprimise. Allow the Devils Lake Diversion to proceed, but add a sand filter and UV/Ozone/chemical disinfection to overflow water to ensure the water entering the hydrological basin is free of foreign biota.

    Will it happen? Only the State Department can make a difference now.
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I think Said1 knows alot about this kind of problem, I believe it's what she is studying at the university. Then again, I could be wrong, cause it's way over my head!
     
  4. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    Environmental Science major right?

    Is the above your idea, or has there been a proposal (a filteration plant is it?) drawn up in Manitoba or elsewhere? Sorry if you posted it, I'm too beat to sort through all your links (I did read one or two though :D ).
     
  5. Isaac Brock
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    Isaac Brock Active Member

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    Environmental Engineer. I'm sure the idea has been tossed around, so I can't say with certainty that I could take credit, but to me, the only way to remove the pathogens from entering the foreign watershed is to remove them from the effluent by treatment.

    This seems to me to be a win-win situation.... Devils Lake has its outlet and could reduce flooding, while Canada can ensure exotic pathogens are removed.
     
  6. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    Then I suggest you get lobbying! Sounds like a fairly simple solution, surprising it hasn't come to fruitation at your end.
     
  7. Isaac Brock
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    Isaac Brock Active Member

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    Well, I actually sent a paper to the International Joint Commission as an anthropological-sociological impact study. It was at least referenced to my knowledge in Manitoba's case to the US Circuit Court.

    Is this indeed, as Kathianne said, what you are studying in university?
     
  8. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    Cool. What was your paper based on - specifically. Or just the title will do.

    Geography, with concentrations in global economics(globalization) and culture (combo of anthropology/sociology). It's a mixed bag, nothing too intense - just the basics really.
     
  9. Isaac Brock
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    Isaac Brock Active Member

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    Let me dig it up,

    Interbasin Water Transfer: A Case study into the Ecological and Sociological Impacts and Causes of the Garrison and Devils Lake Diversion Projects

    I'm more than happy to send a copy, if you want some dry, nighttime reading. :p
     
  10. Said1
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    Said1 VIP Member

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    Did you basically bottom-lined it in your second post?

    Send it if you want, I need another half credit in environmental geog, I may use it as a source. Seriously! :D

    Just as an aside, and since you seem to be the person to ask, isn't the use of technology used in the process of de-salinization (sp??) somewhat limited? Does that matter in this case?
     

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