Commencing Black History Month (Where The Budget Money Never Goes)

Discussion in 'Economy' started by mascale, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. mascale
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    mascale VIP Member

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    So with East Africa in Drought, Haiti under tons of rubble, only 14 of 100 U. S. black males with jobs: Can anyone guess where the new federal budget will never ever go!

    Obama unveils $3.83T budget with massive deficits - Yahoo! News

    Anyone lighter-skinned than the Lone Ranger--as we compare and contrast the dialects even then--when some people really didn't matter: Anyone knows where the money won't be going.

    http://money.cnn.com/2010/02/01/news/economy/stimulus_extensions/index.htm

    In fact, apparently the West Wing intends to send a large chunk of the money to the people who caused the downturn in the first-place. These are called the 7 mil., teachers, and their millions more allied staff, who do the wrong thing every time they draw fixed percentage raised pay-check!

    Even rich black households, however, are secure in the "legal tender for all debts public and private." When it comes to aid for Haiti or East Africa, just coincidentally: The law allows that no has to do anything at all, or send in any money at all. Probably former President George Bush II knew that best, though the other two were also Ivy League and Yale.

    So instead there is the new budget document, sending in money to where it has not exactly, never been sent before! See, for example, preservative stimulus two! "It's very critical that state and local governments receive assistance from the federal government," said Sujit CanagaRetna, senior fiscal analyst at the Council of State Governments. "If you don't, you run the risk of states being a drag on the national economy."

    At least there is a proposed extension of the Make Work Pay Refundable Tax Credit, national Equal Dollar Amount kind of COLA, included. That is about $800.00 for about 40 mil. filers, plus the income tax filers who have a liability. That leaves about $3.8 tril. for the upper income tax filers--who simply don't qualify for the West Wing Largess in the Make Work Pay Tax Credit.

    Probably Reverend Jeremiah Wright, will not be mentioned, as is usual: In the more fashionable, upper income, black American households. . . schools. . . .churches. . . .businesses. . . and of course, the federal offices, too!

    "Crow, James Crow: Shaken, Not Stirred!"
    (Paulson notes that George Bush II would not allow an economic summit, grandstanding France. . . .which is also not relevant excepting that a thing or two was known about White History, too! They are so like, some other people!)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010
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    The White House, by the Garden, opens the budget with the Administration message:

    ". . . .Long before this crisis hit, middle-class families were under growing strain. For decades,Washingtonfailed to address fundamental weaknesses in the economy: rising health-care costs, a growing dependence on foreign oil, and an education system unable to prepare our children for the jobs of the future. In recent years, spending bills and tax cuts for the wealthy were approved without paying for any of it, leaving behind a mountain of debt. And while Wall Street gambled without regard for the consequences, Washington looked the other way. As a result, the economy may have been working very well for those at the very top, but it was not working for the middle class.

    Year after year, Americans were forced to work longer hours and spend more time away from their loved ones, while their incomes flat-lined and their sense of economic security evaporated. Beneath the statistics are the stories of hardship I’ve heard all across America.
    For too many, there has long been a sense that the American dream—a chance to make your own way, to support your family, save for college and retirement, own a home—was slipping away. And this sense of anxiety has been combined with a deep frustration that Washington either didn’t notice, or didn’t care enough to act. Those days are over. In the aftermath of this crisis, what is clear is that we cannot simply go back to business as usual. We cannot go back to an economy that yielded cycle after cycle of speculative booms
    and painful busts. We cannot continue to accept an education system in which our students trail their peers in other countries, and a health-care system in which exploding costs put our businesses at a competitive disadvantage and squeeze the incomes of our workers. We cannot continue to ignore the clean energy challenge and stand still while other countries move forward in the emerging industries of the 21st Century.

    And we cannot continue to borrow against our children’s future, or allow
    specialinterests to determine how public dollars are spent. That is why, as we strive to meet the crisis of the moment, we are continuing to lay a new foundation for the future.
    Already, we have made historic strides to reform and improve our schools, to pass health insurance reform, to build a new clean energy economy, to cut wasteful spending, and to limit the influence of lobbyists and special interests so that we are better serving the national interest. However, there is much left to do, and this Budget lays out the way ahead.

    Because an educated workforce is essential in a 21st Century global economy, we are undertaking a reform of elementary and secondary school funding by setting high standards, encouraging innovation, and rewarding success; making the successful Race to the Top fund permanent and opening it up to innovative school districts; investing in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers; and
    putting our Nation closer to meeting the goal of leading the world in new college graduates by 2020

    Moreover, since in today’s economy learning must last a lifetime, my Administration will reform the job-training system, streamlining it and focusing it on the high-growth sectors of the economy. Because even the best-trained workers in the world can’t compete if our businesses are saddled with rapidly increasing health-care costs, we’re fighting to reform our Nation’s broken health insurance system and relieve this unsustainable burden.

    My Budget includes funds to lay the groundwork for these reforms—by investing in health information technology, patient-centered research, and prevention and wellness—as well as to improve the health of the Nation by increasing the number of primary care physicians, protecting the safety of our food and drugs, and investing in critical biomedical research.

    Because small businesses are critical creators of new jobs and economic growth, the Budget
    eliminates capital gains taxes for investments in small firms and includes measures to increase these firms’ access to the loans they need to meet payroll, expand their operations, and hire new workers. Because we know the nation that leads in clean energy will be the nation that leads the world, the Budget creates the incentives to build a new clean energy economy—from new loan guarantees that will encourage a range of renewable energy efforts and new nuclear power plants to spurring the development of clean energy on Federal lands. More broadly, the Budget makes critical investments
    that will ensure that we continue to lead the world in new fields and industries: doubling research and development funding in key physical sciences agencies; expanding broadband networks across our country; and working to promote American exports abroad.

    And because we know that our future is dependent on maintaining American leadership abroad and ensuring our security at home, the Budget funds all the elements of our national power—including our military—to achieve our goals of winding down the war in Iraq, executing our new strategy in Afghanistan, and fighting al Qaeda all over the world. To honor the sacrifice of the men and women who shoulder this burden and who have throughout our history, the Budget also provides significant resources, including advanced appropriations, to care for our Nation’s veterans.

    Rising to these challenges is the responsibility we bear for the future of our children, our
    grandchildren, and our Nation. This is an obligation to change not just what we do in Washington, but how we do it.

    As we look to the future, we must recognize that the era of irresponsibility in Washington must end. On the day my Administration took office, we faced an additional $7.5 trillion in national debt by the end of this decade as a result of the failure to pay for two large tax cuts, primarily for the wealthiest Americans, and a new entitlement program. We also inherited the worst recession since the Great Depression—which, even before we took any action, added an additional $3 trillion to the national debt. Our response to this recession, the Recovery Act, which has been critical to restoring economic growth, will add an additional $1 trillion to the debt—only 10 percent of these costs. In total, the
    surpluses we enjoyed at the start of the last decade have disappeared; instead, we are $12 trillion deeper in debt. In the long term, we cannot have sustainable and durable economic growth without getting our fiscal house in order."

    So does anyone see Wall Street, education, research and development, small business ownership, defense mega-corporations, high-tech new energy, college, savings, investments, and interest on the national debt included?

    Food Stamps is not what this budget message is all about.

    There is a separate section on amounts that get cut or eliminated altogether. That is really not the point of this thread!

    "Crow, James Crow: Shaken, Not Stirred!"
    (Actually, Her Majesty's government can understand the message of the budget completely, just like Her Majesty's. . . .children understand things.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010

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