BYE Anthony Bourdain WE loved U

Discussion in 'Health and Lifestyle' started by AZGAL, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. AZGAL
    Offline

    AZGAL Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,972
    Thanks Received:
    354
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Arid Zona
    Ratings:
    +1,565
    il_fullxfull.1572824051_oo4a.jpg
     
  2. AZGAL
    Offline

    AZGAL Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,972
    Thanks Received:
    354
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Arid Zona
    Ratings:
    +1,565
    Randall Colburn
    Great Job Internet
    What Wikipedia views can tell us about how we process celebrity deaths


    The death of a celebrity has always been big news, but nowadays it’s maybe best described as all-encompassing. Tributes and thinkpieces flood every site, while your social media feed turns into a battle of competitive grieving. This can be cathartic for some, who, in the wake of the loss, want to immerse themselves in every aspect of the celebrity, while others can get overwhelmed or even annoyed, especially if you’ve never heard of the now-deceased.

    It’s that latter group that’s likely responsible for much of the data culled by Pudding’s latest interactive study. Writer Russell Goldenberg studied the Wikipedia traffic of more than 1,300 celebrities who died in the past three years, exploring the ways in which their traffic spiked after their death and the length of time it took for that traffic to go back to normal. Prince’s Wikipedia traffic spiked the highest, reaching roughly 11 million pageviews in the 48 hours following his passing. Stephen Hawking, Anthony Bourdain, David Bowie, and Chester Bennington also saw significant spikes, likely due to the younger, tech-obsessed generation having no clue who all the olds wouldn’t stop tweeting about. Inversely, the high spikes of XXXtentacion and Aviici’s pages likely represent the nation’s dads trying to understand why their kids were so sad.
    \
    Often, Goldenberg discovers, the desire for information on that celebrity can eclipse other noteworthy news stories, whether it be the NBA finals, the royal wedding, or Donald Trump’s inauguration (in terms of Wikipedia searches, a lot more people cared about Carrie Fisher’s passing than they did our president).

    Also interesting are the celebrities whose pageviews are still spiking compared to the numbers from before their passing. “There are plenty of possible reasons for this; perhaps the person was relatively unknown before, and their death increased their visibility. Or maybe there was a renewed interest in their life’s work,” writes Goldenberg.


    Explore the entire study here.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018
  3. AZGAL
    Offline

    AZGAL Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,972
    Thanks Received:
    354
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Arid Zona
    Ratings:
    +1,565
  4. AZGAL
    Offline

    AZGAL Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,972
    Thanks Received:
    354
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Arid Zona
    Ratings:
    +1,565
    Life
    5/3: Over the Hill at 67?
    Marist Poll
    Published on May 3, 2018

    While a majority of Americans (53%) consider someone who is 67 years old to be middle-aged, that proportion has ticked down from last year when 58% thought someone who was 66 was middle-aged. To compound matters for our fearless leader, the proportion of Americans who think his current age is old is up, 40% from 33% last year. Only 6% of Americans think a person who is 67 is young. This compares with 10% who thought 66 was youthful.

    “I’m now surprised and disappointed by these numbers,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “I can only guess that people mistakenly think 67 is pushing 70.”

    The most profound change has occurred in the perceptions of Americans ages of 30 to 44. 55% of these adults consider 67 to be old, up from 39% who, last year, said 66 was over the hill. Among Americans 45 or older, close to two-thirds (65%) say someone who is 67 is middle-aged, little changed from last year. However, more adults 45 to 59 (33% from 24%) and 60 or older (22% from 16%) say Dr. Miringoff’s age is old.

    Among Americans 75 or older, 70% think someone who is 67 years old is middle-aged. 16% think Dr. Miringoff’s age is young, and 13% consider it old.

    “I started this annual survey when I turned 39 and thought it was a clever way to demonstrate how a pollster comes to terms with middle-age,” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “Now, 28 years later, the joke’s on me.”

    Complete May 3, 2018 Marist Poll Release of the United States
     
  5. AZGAL
    Offline

    AZGAL Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,972
    Thanks Received:
    354
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Location:
    Arid Zona
    Ratings:
    +1,565
    CNN's Anthony Bourdain dead at 61
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/08/us/anthony-bourdain-obit
    Jun 08, 2018 · Anthony Bourdain, the gifted chef, storyteller and writer who took TV viewers around the world to explore culture, cuisine and the human condition for nearly two decades, has died.
     

Share This Page