Artful Homemade Quilts Have A Way

Discussion in 'Arts & Crafts' started by freedombecki, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. freedombecki
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    freedombecki Let's go swimmin'! Supporting Member

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    Qults have a way of hugging their recipients with the maker's love, whether they are done by little hand stitches or stitched on a home sewing machine. I'm starting this thread so you can enjoy sharing your quilts and see some of mine, some I found on ebay, etc. If you have a traditional pieced quilt and want to know the name of the pattern, post a picture here, and I'll use all my resources to tell you the name of the block or blocks that were used to make your quilt. Just say the word. Here's a Postage Stamp Quilt I made for a beloved friend's grandson:

    [​IMG]
     
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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2011
  2. Truthmatters
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    Truthmatters BANNED

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    That is some handywork and very beautiful.

    Job well done
     
  3. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    I don't have any pictures but I do have a quilt made by my great grandmother and her daughters and her granddaughters, too. They made it way back in the 50s.

    It is rather beautiful.

    I remember them sitting around in a circle quilting when I was a little kid.
     
  4. freedombecki
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    freedombecki Let's go swimmin'! Supporting Member

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    Another good resource for finding a quilt you like is from fabric companies. They hire really good quilters to show off their fabrics, which tend to be prettier each year than last year's. Here's an example:

    [​IMG]

    This Thumbnail is of a Jinny Beyer Quilt.
    Jinny has designed numerous lines of fabric over the years for RJR Company, who have been backbone supporters at the annual National Quilt competitions in Paducah, Kentucky. I've taken classes from Jinny Beyer twice at Quilting in the Tetons in Jackson, Wyoming. She's an amazing hand quilter and mathematician. The pattern of her quilt is found at the RJR website in PDF Adobe format, and it is free. Of course, nobody designs Jinny Beyer fabrics except Jinny, so she gives an edge to those who use her patterns and seek and find her really beautiful threads... Here's the page you can find the free Jinny Beyer pattern and others.

    If you sew but don't quilt, you can find lessons at a local quilt store near you by looking in the Yellow pages under "Quilt Stores" or go online. You can also try your luck from following the instructions given. About 1 in 2,000 seamstresses can successfully execute a quilt from the written word, but it could take a year if you try to do all by hand. Some can accomplish a complex quilt like the above thumbnail in a month with the use of a sewing machine. Jinny says she can complete one of her quilts in the same time as most machine quilters. However, if you've ever sewn in a factory, you may be able to do the quilt in s shorter time. At the link above, if you go to the PDF page, you will see a larger version of the thumbnail, which in and of itself shows a stunning nature quilt, imho.
     
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  5. freedombecki
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    freedombecki Let's go swimmin'! Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Truthmatters. The quilt is known as a "charm" quilt. That means each piece came from a different bolt of cloth. Even little speed demons like me on a machine can be challenged to do such a work in less than a month. I cut strips then one square from each strip for weeks on end to make that quilt, leaving more leftovers to make about 20 more the same size. :)

    I have like, a quilt addiction....
     
  6. Truthmatters
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    I like them best made from scraps of old clothing that people have actually worn and or used.

    They mean so much more.

    Grandmas tablecoth that got torn, aunt Margrets sunday dress, brother Bobs summer shorts and the like.

    Every little corner has a memory
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2011
  7. freedombecki
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    freedombecki Let's go swimmin'! Supporting Member

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    Well, Editec, I'll dance at your weddin' if you take a picture of your beloved heirloom and show it here. Do you know if the quilt is from pieced patterns or did your family's dear women make applique pieces into a pictorial quilt? If I could see the quilt, I could tell you if you had an album quilt, and the names of the blocks if they are in the traditional mainstream. Barbara Brackman wrote a book on traditional American applique blocks as well, and I have a copy of that around here some where if I don't know the exact name, I can find it if your family's women used patterns from the mainstream, such as Kansas City Star, McCall's magazines, the Workbasket, and other periodicals and publications at or before the 50s when your quilt was done.
     
  8. AllieBaba
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    AllieBaba BANNED

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    Thanks for the quilt thread..I have a quilt I started more than a year ago sitting at the foot of my bed, waiting for me to finish it.

    It's nothing like those beauties but it's mine and when it's finished, it will be my first full sized one. It's kind of a funny size, and sort of mishmash, but I figure when I'm done quilting it, it won't matter. It's for my niece, who finished medical school about the time I started it and who is now an ER resident. I'd like to finish it for her before Christmas. That's my dream, anyway, lol...
     
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  9. AllieBaba
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    AllieBaba BANNED

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    I'll get a pic of it on eventually...
     
  10. freedombecki
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    freedombecki Let's go swimmin'! Supporting Member

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    Those are indeed treasures. I have a different take, though. Though my postage stamp charm quilt is mostly new materials, there are a few pieces from the closet of fabrics leftover sewing scraps from my children's growing-up clothes, but all were new as my dear friend has allergies. The fabrics used were both from my quilt store of 25 years, and each piece was picked to satisfy an artist's palette I wanted the women of my small town to have available to them. When you live in a small town and operate such a store, you ask "If something bad happened, and I had to shut the shop down, would I enjoy sewing this particular piece of fabric into quilts for the rest of my life? That made each piece requirement have to be the best I could find in that color niche. Other artists can mix titanium white with any other tube and arrive at a tint. Quilt Artists have to have the correct tint ahead of time, and there are a bazillion tints, shades, hues, and tones out there we can't get in any other way than by careful choosing. It made my shop an assistant to those of an artistic demand to have the correct color available immediately.

    Also, I didn't have the privilege of enough time to go to other people's quilt stores, since I had to show up at my own shop every day of my life for all those years when I was healthy enough to do so. When I was working on that quilt, I had to go to my daughter's in Las Vegas. She'd been injured in a motorcycle accident on the job, and she needed a back surgery and someone to sit with her until she healed enough to go back on her beat. It isn't easy to find quilt fabrics in hot Las Vegas, so I had to go to a lot of shops to pick quarter yards of a couple of hundred pieces, and fortunately, they had a JoAnne's fabric store with a decent selection of economical cottons. I remember where I found every piece of fabric in that quilt when I look it over. That quilt maps my daughter's getting well, so like you, the quilt means something to me, but I will not see it again, as my dear friend is now 1300 miles away and is dying of cancer. Her daughter lives another 1000 miles from there or even more, and her son is probably in school now, not a baby, and the quilt may have been overwashed, given away, given to charity, or stored. Who knows? Even so, the picture is all I have left of memories of two familes and the dearest daughter who ever lived.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2011

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