AP poll: Most say they, pets understand each other

Discussion in 'Pets' started by Lycurgus, Dec 17, 2008.

  1. Lycurgus
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    Lycurgus Who is Obama, really...??

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    FOXNews.com - AP poll: Most say they, pets understand each other - Local News | News Articles | National News | US News

    AP poll: Most say they, pets understand each other
    Wednesday, December 17, 2008

    WASHINGTON —

    Sixty-seven percent of pet owners say they understand their animals' woofs, meows or other sounds, including 18 percent like King and Thibodeau who say they comprehend completely, according to an Associated Press-Petside.com poll released Wednesday. In a finding many parents of teenagers would no doubt envy, 62 percent of pet owners say that when they speak, their critter gets the message.

    Stephen King of rural Texas says he has his dog's vocabulary figured out. Molly Thibodeau says her cats comprehend her so well that they get it when she simply points.

    "I speak to her on limited subjects and she does the same with me," said King, 63, a retired chemist from Kempner, Texas, who says he understands his dog, Dagny's, repertoire of barks signaling anger, eagerness, contentment and other feelings. "Common sense works 98 percent of the time."

    The high level of communication is but one way the poll highlights the bond between many owners and their pets. According to the survey, conducted by GfK, only one in seven owners say they have been forced to trim spending for their pets during the past year's recession. More than four in 10 _ about as many as last year _ are buying holiday gifts for their animals.

    More women than men say they and their pets understand each other's verbal stabs at communication. Older and lower-income people are also likelier to cite high levels of comprehension between them and their animals.

    Thibodeau, 20, of Fort Riley, Kan., said her two cats understand her so completely that if she wants to shoo them off furniture, "I point at them and they get right down."

    On the flip side, men are twice as likely as women to say they and their pets are clueless about what each is saying to the other _ a group that overall comprises fewer than one in 10 pet owners.

    "It's kind of like, 'What are you doing?'" Edwin Oto, 47, of Moraga, Calif., says of his futile efforts to figure out what his dog, Shilo, wants when she keeps barking after he lets her into the house.

    Three in 10 dog owners think their pet is baffled when they speak to it, compared with nearly half of cat owners who say the same about their animal.

    When it comes to communicating in the other direction, cat owners do better. Twenty-five percent of them say they completely understand their cats' meows, compared with 16 percent of dog owners who claim to be totally fluent in barks.

    But Jane Starring, 48, of Barrington, R.I., says she and her family are confounded by their 8-year-old cat, Flannel, who often chases people about the house meowing.

    "We're not sure we're making much progress understanding him," said Starring. "I don't know what his point is."

    William Miller, a professor of veterinary medicine and medical director of Cornell University's Companion Animal Hospital, says it's not unusual for many owners and pets to understand some of each other's speech. He said animals and people learn to communicate verbally by over time associating certain sounds with actions, such as a particular bark when a dog wishes to go outside or the soothing tone many people use when petting their cat.

    "It's not like you'll sit down and have a U.N. conversation with them" spoken in different languages, Miller said.

    With many households having more than one pet, 74 percent of all pet owners have a dog and 46 percent have a cat, according to the poll. Men and women were about equally likely to own either kind of animal.

    Twelve percent of pet owners have fish, 7 percent have birds, and 2 percent or fewer have horses, rabbits, rodents, turtles, lizards or other pets.

    Just 15 percent of all owners said they have scaled back spending for their pets in the past year, suggesting the recession is prompting many to save money other ways before squeezing their pet budget.

    "They look to me for food and shelter just like my children do," said Charlotte Phillips, 40, of Abingdon, Va., a mother of two whose family is cutting its overall spending but not for its two dogs and five cats. "They can't fend for themselves."

    Of the group that is cutting back, 27 percent say they have seriously considered giving up their pet. Seventy-one percent say they've thought about buying it fewer toys or clothes, while 60 percent cite switching to less costly pet food.

    About half spending less for pets say they've thought about postponing routine veterinary visits and getting less grooming. About one in five have considered delaying care for an animal's serious health problems or cutting day care or walking services.

    Even so, 43 percent of owners said they would buy holiday gifts for their pets, compared with 46 percent who said they had done so last year. Dogs would seem to have more to look forward to this season: 48 percent of dog owners but just 28 percent of cat owners say they will buy their pets gifts.

    The AP-Petside.com poll was conducted by GfK Roper Public Affairs & Media from Dec. 3-8 and involved landline and cell phone interviews with 1,129 randomly chosen pet owners. The margin of sampling error in the poll is plus or minus 2.9 percentage points.
     
  2. DavidS
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    DavidS Anti-Tea Party Member

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    I bark at my own dog.

    'Nuff said.
     
  3. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    I've been learning to speak Skyperkee for the last ten years or so.

    My dog speaks better English than I do Skyperkee, but we're doing okay.
     
  4. Shogun
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    Shogun Free: Mudholes Stomped

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    my dog uses his ears and facial expressions in order to communicate. It's cute as hell. I swear to god that animal has a "you've got to be fucking kidding me" expression.


    Thankfully, he figured out what "Puppy Control" meant real quick in his formative years.


    [​IMG]
     
  5. catzmeow
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    catzmeow BANNED

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    I think our dog communicates pretty well, but she doesn't have us trained the way the cats do. The cats are just plain bossy and domineering. I do feel like the dog understands us, she knows "no," "out of the kitchen," "down," "go for a ride in the car," but sometimes, it's like she's the pitcher and we're the catcher, and she's shaking off our signals. She only comes when she wants to.
     
  6. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    my dogs understand that if the food goddess aint happy...something may have to die..they do not like raised voices to the food goddess nor men they do not know...

    but they do have that..."how the hell did i get this stupid human look" at times
     
  7. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    o and they both have wicked senses of humor...the dobie will catch something and come inside...he will sit down and watch me..till i notice him...and i will ask..what do you have in your mouth...he seems to grin...i will then go over and give him the command "give" he then drops a live (small enough to fit in dobies mouth) creature in the floor and watches the chaos...

    the mixed dog...likes to just take things...my neighbors have a lot of one items from a pair..is all i can figure out
     
  8. Lycurgus
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    Lycurgus Who is Obama, really...??

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    LOL .................. Thank you so much, that brought back some very fond memories. Our Dobie would do much the same. She was the big hunter and would proudly display her catch of the day.

    for many year we had a large family of white squirrels which lived out back and they simply drove her crazy. As they would scoot up a tree after a good chase around the yard, she (Shera our dobie) would get frustrated and tear the limbs and branches off the trees. In fact, when she could not reach the branches by jumping up from the ground, she would try to find something higher to jump up from, like the woodpiles or other items. It was as if she was trying to hinder their ability to climb the trees. It was fun to watch.

    She was a dear friend and family member.
     

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