America is paying for killing 'incidents'.

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Superlative, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    Civilian Claims on U.S. Suggest the Toll of War

    In February 2006, nervous American soldiers in Tikrit killed an Iraqi fisherman on the Tigris River after he leaned over to switch off his engine. A year earlier, a civilian filling his car and an Iraqi Army officer directing traffic were shot by American soldiers in a passing convoy in Balad, for no apparent reason.

    The incidents are among many thousands of claims submitted to the Army by Iraqi and Afghan civilians seeking payment for noncombat killings, injuries or property damage American forces inflicted on them or their relatives.

    The claims provide a rare window into the daily chaos and violence faced by civilians and troops in the two war zones. Recently, the Army disclosed roughly 500 claims to the American Civil Liberties Union in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. They are the first to be made public.

    They represent only a small fraction of the claims filed. In all, the military has paid more than $32 million to Iraqi and Afghan civilians for noncombat-related killings, injuries and property damage, an Army spokeswoman said. That figure does not include condolence payments made at a unit commander’s discretion.

    The paperwork, examined by The New York Times, provides unusually detailed accounts of how bystanders to the conflicts have become targets of American forces grappling to identify who is friend, who is foe.

    In the case of the fisherman in Tikrit, he and his companion desperately tried to appear unthreatening to an American helicopter overhead.

    “They held up the fish in the air and shouted ‘Fish! Fish!’ to show they meant no harm,” said the Army report attached to the claim filed by the fisherman’s family. The Army refused to compensate for the killing, ruling that it was “combat activity,” but approved $3,500 for his boat, net and cellphone, which drifted away and were stolen.

    In the killings at the gas station in Balad, documents show that the Army determined that the neither of the dead Iraqis had done anything hostile or criminal, and approved $5,000 to the civilian’s brother but nothing for the Iraqi officer.

    In another incident, in 2005, an American soldier in a dangerous Sunni Arab area south of Baghdad killed a boy after mistaking his book bag for a bomb satchel. The Army paid the boy’s uncle $500.

    The Foreign Claims Act, which governs such compensation, does not deal with combat-related cases. For those cases, including the boy’s, the Army may offer a condolence payment as a gesture of regret with no admission of fault, of usually no higher than $2,500 per person killed.

    The total number of claims filed, or paid, is unclear, although extensive data has been provided in reports to Congress. There is no way to know immediately whether disciplinary action or prosecution has resulted from the cases.

    Soldiers hand out instruction cards after mistakes are made, so Iraqis know where to file claims. “The Army does not target civilians,” said Maj. Anne D. Edgecomb, an Army spokeswoman. “Sadly, however, the enemy’s tactics in Iraq and Afghanistan unnecessarily endanger innocent civilians.”

    There are no specific guidelines to tell Army field officers judging the claims how to evaluate the cash value of a life taken, Major Edgecomb said. She said officers “consider the contributions the deceased made to those left behind and offer an award based on the facts, local tribal customs, and local law.”

    In Haditha, one of the most notorious incidents involving American troops in Iraq, the Marines paid residents $38,000 after troops killed two dozen people in November 2005.

    The relatively small number of claims divulged by the Army show patterns of misunderstanding at checkpoints and around American military convoys that often result in inadvertent killings. In one incident, in Feb. 18, 2006, a taxi approached a checkpoint east of Baquba that was not properly marked with signs to slow down, one Army claim evaluation said. Soldiers fired on the taxi, killing a woman and severely wounding her daughter and son. The Army approved an unusually large condolence payment of $7,500.

    In September 2005, soldiers killed a man and his sister by firing 200 rounds into their car as it approached a checkpoint, apparently too quickly, near Mussayib. The Army lieutenant colonel who handled the claim awarded relatives a $10,000 compensation payment, finding that the soldiers had overstepped the rules of engagement.

    “There are some very tragic losses of civilian life, including losses of whole families,” said Anthony D. Romero, the A.C.L.U.’s executive director, in an interview. He said the claims showed “enormous confusion on all sides, both from the civilian population on how to interact with the armed services and also among the soldiers themselves.”.........


    By PAUL von ZIELBAUER
    Published: April 12, 2007

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/12/world/middleeast/12abuse.html?ref=world
     
  2. roomy
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    roomy The Natural

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    So, how many can America afford to kill?:eusa_drool:
     
  3. hjmick
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    hjmick Gold Member

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    All of them. [​IMG]
     
  4. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    At this rate, alot more, I feel this is an exceptionally good price.

    I mean, a payout of less than the price of a midsize american car, for a human life?

    Come on, deals like this dont come along too often.

    We should definetly send more troops over there to take advantage of this!
     
  5. roomy
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    roomy The Natural

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    Do the Iraq and Afghan governments pay compensation to the families of murdered allied servicemen? I don't think so, so why the fuck should we?We are there at the behest of these governments now, let them pay the death bills or politely ask us to leave.
     
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  6. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    Isnt the US there based on false intel and more than a couple padded lies?
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/darkside/view/
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/pentagon/view/

    Doesnt the US compensate US families when Military Personel are killed in Combat?

    I dont think very many US soldiers were killed by accident waving fish around, or had their wives and children gunned down in Taxi-cabs.

    Why shouldnt the US pay for killing a mother, and wonding her children? or killing fisherman??

    I think they should pay more, but I guess in relation to american market value, life is less precious there.

    Im sure before we arrived, and killed between 65,000 and 655,000 people, the price for a human was alot higher.
     
  7. roomy
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    roomy The Natural

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    Is the figure 65,001 or 654,999 try to be more specific please.
     
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  8. Superlative
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    Superlative Senior Member

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    The official numbers according the the US government are 65,000

    655,000 according to studies by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, published in the British medical journal the Lancet.

    "Last fall, a controversial Johns Hopkins University survey published in The Lancet medical journal estimated that almost 655,000 Iraqis – 1,000 a day – had died violently between the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003 and July 2006. The survey was widely dismissed because it didn't record actual deaths, but made a statistical extrapolation from 1,800 households. It also didn't distinguish between war-related and sectarian deaths."

    "Separating the two, however, has become increasingly difficult. The Brookings Institution, which tracks Iraqi deaths, says "it is no longer practical to differentiate between acts of war and crime."

    "Violent civilian deaths shouldn't be split into categories, says Hani Khalil, organizing co-ordinator of United For Peace and Justice, an anti-war umbrella group in New York."

    "The crime is the result of the U.S. invasion," he says. "The murders have been triggered by the occupation. Many deaths go undocumented because the bodies end up in the river."

    "Iraq Body Count, a respected British human security group that compiles data from international media reports, says it estimates the total death toll since 2003 as somewhere between a low of 53,832 and a high of 59,447. Its 2006 tally is 24,500."


    http://www.thestar.com/article/171923

    http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L11791889.htm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3962969.stm
     
  9. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    And Lancet has been lanced how many times? If you buy that, let me give you a link to newsbots.com
     
  10. actsnoblemartin
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    actsnoblemartin I love Andrea & April

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    Do the Iraq and Afghan governments pay compensation to the families of murdered allied servicemen? I don't think so, so why the fuck should we?We are there at the behest of these governments now, let them pay the death bills or politely ask us to leave.
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